Recruitology Inks Deal to Power Job Search on Over 1,700 Newspaper, Media Properties

The war to own real estate on the web rages on. On the heels of last year’s news that Recruitology was replacing CareerBuilder as McClatchy’s partner-of-choice for employment, the company announced a partnership with Local Media Consortium.

“We’re honored to serve as the technology platform for LMC members to reclaim ownership of their local recruitment advertising markets,” said Roberto Angulo, co-founder and CEO of Recruitology. “We look forward to helping media companies deploy our tools to attract and retain employers of all sizes.”

The deal means Recruitology is now poised to power the employment technology for over 75 media companies, representing more than 1,700 digital properties. Familiar properties include Philly.com, Boston Globe, Chicago Sun-Times, and The Seattle Times. The partnership also puts Recruitology into organizations like Tegna, which powers a variety of television sites.

The entire network currently spans 155 million unique monthly visitors, and LMC member companies serve more than four billion pageviews to readers. Experience tells me about 10 percent of that traffic actually visits the employment section. Monster will also continue to be an LMC partner and Recruitology works with many Monster papers.

“This is a big consortium of smaller media companies, a lot of them,” added Angulo, whose company has embraced such partnerships for a while now. In fact, a large number of LMC members, such as McClatchy, already use Recruitology to power their recruitment advertising business with private-label job boards, for access to dozens of niche job sites, and programmatic job targeting to job aggregators.

“LMC continues to add to its member services and to deliver technology solutions that help our members expand their recruitment presence in local markets,” said Rusty Coats, CEO of the LMC. “This partnership comes at a time when growing digital revenue is more important than ever. We believe Recruitology can help our members remain strong and relevant for local advertisers and readers.”

Staking claim to as many web properties as possible has come full circle. Companies like CareerBuilder and Monster used to rule this strategy, primarily because they had the dollars or the connections to make it happen. Because of the demise of traditional media, and the devaluation of job boards, smaller players get to have some fun.

Article Continues Below

Sponsored Content

Dice’s 2018 Diversity and Inclusion Report

Discrimination is still a major problem in tech, with more than 40% of women experiencing bias. The same is true for those who identify as LGBTQ. Do more to promote inclusivity – start by downloading Dice’s 2018 Diversity and Inclusion Report.

The trend is also catching fire, thanks to Google for Jobs. Because Google lets users choose which job board or site they want to use to apply, everyone is kind of the same now. Therefore, getting in front of unique eyeballs through partnerships like the ones Recruitology are building has increased value.

Others following the trend include RealMatch, which bounced CareerBuilder out of its newspaper relationship last year, and ZipRecruiter, which recently acquired JobBoard.io, giving its postings better distribution.

Joel Cheesman

Joel Cheesman has over 20 years experience in the online recruitment space. He worked for both international and local job boards in the late ‘90s and early ‘00s. In 2005, Cheesman founded HRSEO, a search engine marketing company for HR, as well as launching an award-winning industry blog called Cheezhead. He has been featured in Fast Company and US News and World Report. He sold his company in 2009 to Jobing.com. He was employed by EmployeeScreenIQ, a background check company. He is the founder of Ratedly, an app that monitors anonymous employee reviews. He is married and the father of three children. He lives in Indianapolis.