To Be Good, You Have to Want It Bad

A local radio station airs a commercial for a weight loss program whose slogan is, “How bad do you want to look good?” Since I’m not particularly concerned about weight loss, I have no idea whether or not this product can produce the results that are advertised. However, their slogan does present an interesting question about personal motivation; a question that I have asked recruiters, consultants, managers and staff throughout our industry:

“How bad do you want to be good?”

How bad do you want to be good at this business? Bad enough to do those things that are necessary to achieve consistent, long-term success? Bad enough to do those things that will allow you to build a valuable and rewarding career? The answer to these questions will be determined by your level of motivation. In other words, how bad do you want it?

Have You the “Want Power?”

Remember: “Want power” leads to will power, and willpower is one of the primary sources of personal motivation.

In my role as a trainer and consultant to our industry, I have witnessed this principle at work hundreds of times. Those practitioners, who want to be successful badly enough, develop the necessary willpower to achieve it. In no area does this become more apparent than in the area of individual, personal development.

Successful recruiters, consultants, and managers do not stop at learning and applying the basics. Rather, they are always developing their skills to higher levels of effectiveness. They realize that by continually building their skills, they are continually building their competence. This is important because competence leads to confidence, and confidence is a critical element of attitude. Having the right attitude is vitally important to achieving success.

How Badly Do You Want to be Good?

How badly do you want to be good in this business?

Badly enough to set aside a minimum of one hour, three days per week (outside of normal business hours) to build your skills through reading, tape review, role playing, or discussion on subjects directly related to the operation of your business?

Bad enough to join and actively participate in at least two associations or business groups that are directly related to your specialty or service sector?

Bad enough to seek out and develop a mentor relationship with business professionals both inside and outside our industry?

Bad enough to invest the hours necessary each day, outside of prime time to thoroughly research your industry, prospects and potential recruits through the use of technology and the appropriate internet resources?

Bad enough to continually focus your effort and activity on achieving results rather than engaging in pleasing processes?

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Bad enough to “just say no” to orders, candidates, and recruits that do not match your criteria for doing business?

Bad enough to accept the fact that you are in an intrusive business, where nothing of real value is created unless you create it?

Bad enough to be personally accountable for your actions and outcomes whatever they may be?

Bad enough to accept how extraordinary you really can be, and then to incorporate this awareness into your attitude and personality?

Professionals who have enjoyed the marvelous benefits of a long, successful, fulfilling, and rewarding career in our industry would answer a resounding “yes” to most of these questions. How about you? How bad do you want to be good in this business?

As always, if you have questions or comments about this article or wish to receive my input on any other topic related to this business, just let me know. Your calls and emails are most welcome.

 

Recipient of the Harold B. Nelson Award, Terry Petra is one of our industry's leading trainers and consultants. He has successfully conducted in-house programs for hundreds of search, placement, temporary staffing firms and industry groups across the U.S., Canada, Mexico, Australia, New Zealand, Russia, England, and South Africa. To learn more about his training products and services, including PETRA ON CALL, and BUSINESS VALUATION, visit www.tpetra.com. Terry can be reached at (651) 738-8561 or click to email him.

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