9 Offices, 5,000 Miles, 20 Hiring Managers and Counting …

This year I decided to try something new. I wanted to meet as many hiring managers and see as many offices as I could. Why? Because while I think it’s important to make a connection with your client(s) via phone call, Skype, and email, I also believe that true and lasting relationships start with the oldest form of business etiquette … a handshake and a smile.

So in October 2016, I was asked to attend a career fair in NJ and drove up the day before so I could visit the office I support in Rochelle Park. I thought this would be an opportune time to meet some of the hiring managers I work with and get a feel for the office in general. It went great and after this initial visit, I decided I wanted to expand this effort and visit more of my hiring managers, co-workers, and offices.

Now I know what you may be thinking: “Well, I can’t just go flying around meeting 8-10 clients face to face in one year.”

I’m not saying you must make this your goal, but I am suggesting you try and visit one office you support over the course of the year. It doesn’t have to be an office clear across the country, but talk with your manager/supervisor to find out if they will support you and your travel efforts and explain to them why this is so valuable. I really believe my hiring managers enjoyed getting to know me on a more personal level.

Getting to meet your clients, co-workers, and the offices you support can give you a great advantage when talking with potential candidates about positions. You can describe the office environment:  what it looks like, how people genuinely interact, and all the positive aspects of the surrounding area.

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So take a break and visit an office. You may find that strengthening the two-way relationships with your hiring managers will improve the success of your hiring and future placements.

Jeremy Bonewitz

Jeremy Bonewitz has been recruiting for over nine years both on the third-party side and corporate side. For the last seven years he has been a corporate recruiter in the engineering, environmental, and construction fields. He is currently a global talent consultant at Stantec in its Laurel, Maryland, office.