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Raghav Singh

Raghav Singh is director of product management at PeopleFluent. He has previously been in product management and marketing roles at several HR technology vendors. His career has included work as a consultant on enterprise HR systems and as a recruiting and HRIT leader at several Fortune 500 companies.

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Getting the Big Picture: Visual Content Is Critical to Building Engagement

by Nov 20, 2014, 5:33 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-11-16 at 8.32.44 PMLately the fastest-growing social networks are those that emphasize visual content. Instagram is the fastest-growing social network, followed by Tumblr and Pinterest. Data from Statista shows that people spend more time on Pinterest (1 hour 17 minutes per month) than on Twitter, LinkedIn, MySpace, and Google+ combined. On Facebook pictures and photos make up 75 percent of the content and produce an 87 percent engagement rate(as measured by likes and comments). Adding a video or photo URL to a tweet increases retweeting by 28-35 percent.

It seems a picture really is worth a thousand words. Recognizing this fact and taking advantage of it in recruitment marketing can be a big help to recruiters who are sourcing on social networks. keep reading…

No Country for Young Men (and Women)

by Jul 29, 2014, 12:38 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-07-16 at 10.06.40 PMThe youth of America are finding it difficult to get jobs. Unemployment for those ages 18-29 reached 13.2 percent in May — about double the general unemployment figure. The lack of jobs for the young has many causes: fewer job opportunities overall; more older people taking jobs that would have been filled by younger workers; and a mismatch between available jobs and people available to fill them.

Fewer Full-Time Jobs

America the land of opportunity is not what it was. keep reading…

Closing the Engagement Gap

by Jul 9, 2014, 12:25 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-06-22 at 8.19.53 PMEmployees can be a very big recruiting resource

A recent report by PR firm Weber Shandwick — Employees Rising: Seizing the Opportunity in Employee Activism – has a lot to say about the potential for tapping employees as a recruitment resource.

The report is based on a global survey done by the firm. The survey found that engaged employees can become activists for their employers. They can be an employer’s best advocates, promoting the company as a great place to work. Many employees actively defend the reputations of their employers. More than half of all employees surveyed reported defending their employer to family or friends or in a public form like a website or a blog.

But they can also be its worst opponents. Just read the reviews on Glassdoor for proof of both.

None of this should be a surprise, but what’s most interesting in the report is that employee advocacy is a largely untapped resource. keep reading…

The Obsession with College Degrees: Are Too Many People Seeking a Degree for the Wrong Reasons?

by Jul 2, 2014, 12:40 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-06-22 at 8.46.54 PMI saw an interview with Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz where he announced that the company would pay for most employees to get a degree online from Arizona State University. This seems like a benefit few of the company’s employees would need. Aren’t most of their baristas already people with worthless degrees?

The type I’ve described as Generation U (unemployed and underemployed). But it seems that Mr. Schultz is just echoing a sentiment that suggest that a college degree is required for most people to have a good career. This starts at the very top in America — the White House’s education imperative states that “Earning a post-secondary degree or credential is a prerequisite for 21st century jobs.”

But while a laudable goal, the pursuit of this means ignoring reality. keep reading…

Waiting for Godot: What to Do When Social Media Fails to Deliver on Its Promise

by Jun 27, 2014, 5:19 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-06-26 at 1.20.42 PMExpectations for what social media can deliver for recruiters have been a lot like the story of the play mentioned as the title for this post. The characters spend all their time getting excited about the arrival of Godot — a man or perhaps a deity. They can’t be sure if they’ve met Godot, if they’re waiting in the right place, if this is the right day, or even whether Godot is going to show up at all, but great things are supposed to happen when he does show up. Well, you can guess how this ends. keep reading…

Rocky Mountain High

by Mar 28, 2014, 5:50 am ET

college_weedThe top 10 reasons to attend the next Colorado Marijuana Industry Job Fair

10. When you onboard people, instead of “Hi, how are you?” you can greet them with “How high are you?” keep reading…

Making Moneyball Work

by Mar 11, 2014, 5:47 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-02-20 at 10.45.35 PMBreaking News: (July 16, 2036) The national Comprehensive and Reliable Assessment of Performance (CRAP) database reached its goal of 100 percent coverage with the last employer — Roto Rooter of Northern Idaho — getting connected to share employee performance data. Employers nationwide now have a central resource to evaluate candidates for jobs, using the concept of Moneyball that was developed in the late 20th century. The database, established by the Dream On Act, is administered by the BUFFOONS (Bureau of Unreliable and Freely Flexible Or Objectionable Numbers and Statistics) at the Department of Labor.

Maybe this will come to pass, but don’t hold your breath and be careful what you wish for. Let’s think about what it’ll take to make Moneyball work. keep reading…

Moneyball and Recruiting: The Future of Hiring or Pie in the Sky?

by Feb 20, 2014, 12:29 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-02-19 at 9.31.09 PMMoneyball is getting to be the new buzzword in recruiting. We’re supposedly on the cusp of a data-driven revolution in hiring. And it seems one is sorely needed, judging by the state of hiring practices today.

When NASA was just getting started many of the engineers that were hired were chosen only on the basis of their resume and cover letters. That was the norm for many jobs up until the 1950s. Interviews were not common for jobs where the candidates were located far from the worksite — the cost of travel, and even long-distance calls, made them unaffordable. Then employers started using all types of assessments, which would suggest that hiring must have improved dramatically over the 50 years that have elapsed.

One would be wrong to reach that conclusion. keep reading…

I, Robot: How Vulnerable Are Recruiters to Automation?

by Jan 28, 2014, 12:25 am ET

self driving car

A recent study from Oxford University suggests that almost half of all job categories are at some risk of being automated within the next 20 years. That includes telemarketers (99 percent certainty); accountants (94 percent), real estate agents (86 percent); airline pilots (55 percent), and even actors (37 percent).

At low risk are jobs like clergy (0.8 percent); dentists (0.4 percent) and recreational therapists (0.2 percent). What is a recreational therapist anyway? The authors of the study don’t define the job, but it sounds suspiciously like an euphemism for a profession popular in Nevada, which would explain the low probability of the job being automated.

The study doesn’t mention recruiters except to say that big data analysis will result in better predictions of performance, especially of students, and will make recruitment more efficient. keep reading…

When Your Recruits Should Be American

by Sep 2, 2013, 6:44 am ET

Screen Shot 2013-08-23 at 6.53.32 AMMy recent post on helping the unemployed generated a lot of interest — shared over a thousand times on Linkedin. I take it that a lot of us would like to do something to help the millions that are unemployed. Here’s my small contribution to that cause. keep reading…

What’s a Degree Worth? A New Test Will Help Employers Know What a Graduate Has Learned

by Aug 29, 2013, 1:18 am ET

Letterman-BuildingIs a degree from Harvard worth more than one from Oklahoma State? By how much? A year at Harvard costs $52,650 versus about $9,000 at OSU. So is a graduate of Harvard almost six times better than one of OSU?

You may soon be able to tell, courtsey of a new test called the Collegiate Learning Assessment that supposedly provides an objective, benchmarked report card for critical-thinking skills. keep reading…

We Need Lobbyists

by Aug 26, 2013, 6:38 am ET

lobbyingWhat’s the difference between the recruiting industry and North Korea? North Korea has a lobbyist in Washington. So does Ultimate Fighting. But no lobbying firm represents recruiting interests in Washington. This means that we are unable to influence things like the immigration bill or anything that directly benefits us.

Lobbyists exist to get Congress to pass or change laws that benefit particular groups — so called “special interests.” So what can a lobbyist do for us? Here’s a list. keep reading…

A Recruiter’s Values

by Aug 16, 2013, 6:14 am ET

What do we stand for?

What is it we do as recruiters? Fill jobs? Source candidates? Use ATS, social networks, job boards, etc? An excellent recruiter and friend of mine — John Amodeo — has a great answer. John says we’re in the life-changing business. Think about it. When we fill a job we’ve transformed somebody’s life, hopefully for the better.

This is the human side of our work, which it seems many of us ignore. I’m just as guilty of this. It’s easy to lose sight of that in the shuffle when we’re neck deep in Linkedin, Facebook, video resumes, and all the other cool technologies we use. I was fortunate to start my career in recruiting managing a team of recruiters, never having hired anyone myself. At the time candidates were just resumes to me. It wasn’t until later that I became a hands-on recruiter. That was when I realized recruiting was more than moving documents and tracking a process. keep reading…

Hiring Generation U: Problems With the Recent Crop of College Grads

by Aug 8, 2013, 6:44 am ET

My recent post on Generation U (underemployed and unemployed) generated an enormous amount of activity on ERE. This is a topic of some interest to recruiters, so in this post I’ll focus on some of the challenges that this generation faces in getting and staying employed. keep reading…

The Unemployment Bias: The Long-term Unemployed Face Severe Discrimination

by Jul 30, 2013, 5:55 am ET

Last year I did some work for a large company that decided it would not hire anyone who was unemployed. It would automatically reject any candidate who had been unemployed even for a day. As I’ve learned, this attitude toward candidates is pervasive — many employers seem to have concluded that the long-term jobless are damaged goods. keep reading…

Generation U: Too Many Underemployed College Grads

by Jul 19, 2013, 6:36 am ET

Screen Shot 2013-07-08 at 3.34.55 PMRecent college grads today face some of the worst job prospects since the great depression. A survey by the Associated Press found that over 50 percent — about 1.5 million — are either unemployed or in jobs that don’t require a college degree. The AP survey found that recent grads were “more likely to be employed as waiters, waitresses, bartenders, and food-service helpers than as engineers, physicists, chemists, and mathematicians combined. There were more working in jobs such as receptionists or payroll clerks than in all computer professional jobs. More also were employed as cashiers, retail clerks, and customer representatives than engineers.”

The only category of grads that saw gains was those with advanced degrees — 98.3 percent of job gains were realized by those with advanced degrees.

Underemployment and unemployment varies a great deal depending on the major. Not surprisingly, students who graduated with degrees in the sciences or other technical fields, such as accounting, are much less likely to be jobless or underemployed than humanities and arts graduates.

The Skills Mismatch keep reading…

Back to the Blog: Insights on Social Media From Marketers

by Jul 2, 2013, 6:06 am ET

Screen Shot 2013-06-17 at 7.05.21 PMPeople who work in marketing have been at the forefront of social media — flogging everything from Apples (not computers — the company has a very limited presence on social media) to zoos. But success, i.e., sales. have been elusive. Only a minority of marketers claim that their companies have increased sales through social media and then after as much as three years of effort! The recently released Social Media Marketing Industry Report documents many of the challenges and frustrations marketers have experienced and the lessons they have learned — useful for any recruiter working with social media.

Some key insights are: keep reading…

Immigration Reform: The Charge of the 535

by Jun 24, 2013, 4:44 am ET

Screen Shot 2013-06-21 at 7.42.36 PMWe are in the midst of yet another attempt at immigration reform. The situation in Washington can be summarized with this adaptation of the Charge of the Light Brigade:

Pass a law, pass a law, pass a law onward

Up to Capitol Hill

Rode the 535 (Senators and Representatives)

Forward the Senate

Vote for the law, Harry Reid said

Up to Capitol Hill

Rode the 535 keep reading…

A Big Thank You to the ERE Community

by May 28, 2013, 6:00 am ET

Reports of my death have been greatly exaggerated. –Mark Twain

It’s been about a month now since my accident. Since then I have received an enormous outpouring of support. So many of you have written, called, and contributed to my care that I don’t know where to begin. The list of those I need to thank is very long. Frankly, I am overwhelmed.

I am slowly recovering and still have many months of rehab ahead of me. The days are long and the evenings are lonely. It’s tough being away from home and my family. But it’s a bump in the road and not the end of the road. It could have been a lot worse. I am seeing evidence of recovery everyday. I will soon be back to doing all the things I did before my accident — like writing for ERE. And I have full faith that I will walk again.

Thank you again to all.

Mobile Engagement: Facebook and Samsung

by Apr 4, 2013, 1:43 pm ET

Galaxy_note_II_Flip-Cover-PhotoThe fPhone is finally here. Facebook is launching its own brand of phones that put social networking front and center. With an estimated 650 million mobile users it was inevitable that Facebook would introduce mobile devices that integrate users more tightly with the site, allowing for faster posting, chatting, and commenting. They might even allow for voice calls (remember those?).

Facebook’s foray into mobile phones is a direct response to Samsung’s plans to develop a social network. Slated to launch this year, it is designed to rival Facebook. The project is codenamed Samsung Facebook (Brilliant! Who could possibly guess what that’s about?). The thinking behind the fPhone and Samsung’s network (I believe the official name will be Twitter Plus) is to control both content and the mechanisms through which it is created. Samsung dominates the mobile phone market and makes nearly a third of all smartphones sold worldwide — more than double what Apple does. All those smartphones are the source of huge amounts of content, which becomes the property of Facebook, Google, etc. This means that most advertising based on that content doesn’t accrue to Samsung. But the combination of mobile phones and a social network is a direct threat to Facebook’s business model.

The Mobile Recruiter keep reading…