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Jillyan French-Vitet

Jillyan French-Vitet is the global acquisition and mobility best practice and innovation lead within Deloitte. As part of the Talent Acquisition and Mobility Center of Excellence, she collaborates with the talent organization on innovative solutions which better enable the acquisition and mobility of talent across borders. She was previously director, talent acquisition advisory services for KellyOCG Recruitment Process Outsourcing. Her background in talent acquisition spans 15 years and includes operational and strategic recruitment, cross-border talent resourcing, and research and innovation.

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My First 90 Days: Leveraging My Candidate Experience During Assimilation

by
Jillyan French-Vitet
Dec 4, 2013, 5:35 am ET

Recently, I achieved a milestone: I completed the first 90 days within my organization. As I opened my email to a “Congratulations on your first 90 days!” message, I took a moment to think back on my candidate experience and how I fared assimilating into the organization which I now call my professional home. I can say I have walked in the shoes of both an external applicant as well as a new employee, and I would like to share personal perceptions of my experience and how I extended that experience into my assimilation period.

Candidate Experience: Before vs. After keep reading…

Mapping the Value of Talent Acquisition

by
Jillyan French-Vitet
Mar 22, 2013, 5:30 am ET

Screen Shot 2013-03-18 at 7.23.42 AMAbout a year ago, I was participating in a series of team meetings when I noticed that one question kept resurfacing: “How can we demonstrate the value of talent acquisition?” While the discussion moved to other topics, this question remained unanswered.

Cost, quality, and speed have underpinned the value proposition of the talent acquisition function for many years. It has been defined by metrics such as productivity, process and channel efficiency, full/sub-cycle time, and the results of satisfaction surveys. Yet, it has become clearer to me that value in talent acquisition is no longer being adequately communicated and translated to our customer base. We need a new way to demonstrate value beyond the walls of our own function. We need to better articulate how and why talent acquisition contributes to the overall worth of the organizations we work for.

Here, I make my case for a new kind of value mapping that centers around talent acquisition first and foremost. Value mapping talent acquisition can deliver better results, with more focused associated costs and impactful communication.

Value: A Simple Definition keep reading…

Think About Talent Like a Financial Planner

by
Jillyan French-Vitet
Jan 22, 2013, 5:45 am ET

sdsuI’m a planner; I have to juggle a career and a family, so my home calendar is my family “book of reference.” It helps us all to know who is where, doing what, at what time, and which parent is responsible.

I am a planner financially too because I have responsibilities and I also have dreams. I have a responsibility to create a financial nest-egg for retirement, my children’s education, and maybe … just maybe … the country house I dream of buying someday.

To help me plan, I engage with a financial planner who works with me on my portfolio, the degree of risk, future plans and responsibilities, as well as current needs. Granted, none of us know how the stock market will look in 20-plus years, but I feel comfortable knowing my current financial plan, and my path.

I am not a financial expert. I work in the business of talent, specifically talent acquisition. It is a domain I enjoy continue to learn in an ever-changing environment where it can be difficult to plan. But it recently dawned on me that how I plan my future financially could also apply to how my organization looks at its talent. After all, without your talent, products and services as well as new ideas and innovation would not exist. If talent is your equity, then (to quote a branded credit card company in the United States) “Do you know what’s in your wallet?” keep reading…