Zubed Shows You the World and the Jobs

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Sliced bread it’s not, even if Jim Stroud is doing a happy dance over ZubedJobs.

The latest import to hop the pond is a job board with a mapping utility so jobseekers and employers can find each other by entering a location and skills. Look closely and you’ll see that Zubed is a mashup of Google Maps and geocoded resumes and job offerings.

It’s kind of fun to see how many Java programmers are being sought in London or how many of them there are in the area. But this isn’t exactly new nor the money dance. Jobster got a job mapping utility back in 2005 when it bought WorkZoo. It didn’t make much use of it, keeping it merely as a novelty before ditching it. SimplyHired won’t pin the jobs on the map the way Zubed does, though it has a mapping function that lets users search for jobs by clicking an area. Indeed has a pretty slick job trends map. And Boston.com has had a search by commute function for years. Not as playful as Zubed, but highly utilitarian for jobseekers even before gas prices broke $4 a gallon.

Most similar to Zubedjobs.com is Mapjobs, a mashup of Google Maps and the Indeed job feed, that has the appearance of a beta test site.

As a job board, ZubedJobs has an uphill battle to gain so much as a foothold. Even if it didn’t take some trial and error to figure out how to use Zubed (entering London, as in London, England, in the search box kept turning up London, Calif.), there’s just not enough mass there yet for the U.S. market. The UK market (where Zubed.com is headquartered) is far better, but the number of jobs is well short of what TotalJobs has to offer. Then again, Zubed is free to both jobseekers and employers.

However, as Zubed spokesman Bob Clements explained in an ERE discussion group:

“Where we make our money is in supplying this solution to companies wishing to manage their own internal talent pools and databases of received applicant CVs and pre-qualified contractors. It provides a highly cost effective way of recruiting, turning not to the open market first but to known and new job seekers that can be immediately viewed as pins on a map.”

Now this is where we might just do a jig ourselves. Coupling Zubed’s mapping capabilities to an existing ATS rich with resumes is a bonanza for the right kind of business. Hiring for a new hotel is one; a high turnover retailer or restaurant is another; pretty much any hourly worker or entry-level position is a candidate. As you go up the skills food chain, candidate location becomes less important.

On the candidate side doing a Zubed search for jobs may soon be imperative. As the cost of driving increases, jobseekers will place ever more importance on finding geographically accessible jobs. Zubed makes it possible to find job listings along mass transit routes, rail stops and the like. For a company with multiple branches, say a large bank, offering candidates a visual look at where the jobs are may well be the deal clincher.

We have to wonder why none of the big job boards have added this kind of search capability to their own listings and resume search. CareerBuilder has a map search in beta; there are geo-limiters for search of course, but nothing yet generally available that so graphically shows where the jobs and candidates are. Time for them to get Zubed?

John Zappe is the editor of TLNT.com and a contributing editor of ERE.net. John was a newspaper reporter and editor until his geek gene lead him to launch his first website in 1994. He developed and managed online newspaper employment sites and sold advertising services to recruiters and employers. Before joining ERE Media in 2006, John was a senior consultant and analyst with Advanced Interactive Media and previously was Vice President of Digital Media for the Los Angeles Newspaper Group.

Besides writing for ERE, John consults with staffing firms and employment agencies, providing content and managing their social media programs. He also works with organizations and businesses to assist with audience development and marketing. In his spare time  he can be found hiking in the California mountains or competing in canine agility and obedience competitions.

You can contact him here.

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