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workforceplanning RSS feed Tag: workforceplanning

Is It Easier to Recruit Recruiters in the U.S. or Canada?

by Sep 19, 2014, 12:14 am ET

Quebec CityAre you looking for a new job, or filling recruiter positions? Being on either end of the spectrum, it may be useful to know what the labor markets are like in North America. We used WANTED Analytics hiring demand and talent supply data to analyze and compare hiring trends for recruiters in the U.S. and Canada. keep reading…

Score Some Winning Insight From a Sports Recruiter’s Perspective

by Sep 16, 2014, 12:59 am ET

Mel playing soccerRecently, I’ve become immersed in some unfamiliar recruiting territory — collegiate sports! As I work with my son, a student athlete, to navigate the college exploration process, I’m noticing many similarities between these two worlds of talent search.

Last month, I met Jay, a sports recruiter/scout who has placed numerous incredible college athletes through the years. Many of his “picks” have gone on to play sports professionally. Jay and I spoke at length about our industries and I asked him the secrets to his success as a recruiter, albeit in another realm.

If you find solutions to your professional challenges by looking to other industries, read his valuable perspective on sports recruiting success, as well as my related observations. keep reading…

Always Open ‘Evergreen Jobs’ Can Improve Your Chances of Recruiting Top Talent

by Jun 30, 2014, 12:22 am ET

treesAs the war for talent continues, it’s time for recruiting leaders and hiring managers to shift to more creative and innovative recruiting solutions. A bold approach that I have been recommending since 1999 is the creation of “evergreen jobs.”

Simply put, these are the one or two most critical corporate jobs where you literally continuously search and hire every more-than-qualified applicant who fits the culture in order to ensure that you always have enough talent in these critical positions.

The term evergreen comes from the fact that the jobs are always open, just as an evergreen tree is always green. Now it might initially seem crazy to hire when you don’t have an open job, but the approach has proven to be quite effective. Imagine if you were an NBA basketball team and LeBron James suddenly became available. Would you hire him immediately, even if you didn’t have an open job or requisition? Of course you would. That’s the concept behind evergreen jobs. Evergreen programs frequently cover jobs with high turnover, including nursing, retail (i.e. REI), and call centers. But they work even better in high-impact mission-critical jobs at growing tech firms with large campuses. 

An Evergreen Job Program continually sources top talent in a mission-critical job. But rather than stopping when you create a pipeline of reserve talent, it continuously “over hires” each of the “more-than-qualified” applicants, in order to create a talent surplus in this critical job.

The Top 10 Reasons Why the Evergreen Job Approach Is So Impactful keep reading…

3 Questions to Consider Before Implementing a Talent Pipeline

by Jun 4, 2014, 12:28 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-05-20 at 12.22.06 PMThe challenge of building a talent pipeline has been a headline topic among recruiting strategists for years, but a majority of firms still don’t see the need or don’t feel they have the resources to do the job right.

A recent survey we conducted found that just 38 percent of employers continuously recruit throughout the year — despite the fact well-managed pipelines can yield real benefits. Two-thirds of those who continuously recruit say their strategy shortens their time to hire and 54 percent say it lowers their cost per hire.

Maintaining and using a pool of interested, qualified candidates for positions that aren’t yet open can be a daunting task. If your organization is still on the fence about talent pipelining or if you are simply not sure about the best course for implementation, the answers to these three questions should provide motivation and direction.

Is the Recruiting Status Quo Costing Your Organization? keep reading…

What? No Job Postings?!?

by May 22, 2014, 2:38 am ET

Inside Zappos profile pic - updatedIf you ask my team, they will tell you that I love change and innovation. In the last couple of years I’ve helped push our team to new heights in sourcing, pioneering, and exploring new HR technology, building in efficiencies and finding unique ways to connect with potential candidates. When I look back at all of those “innovative” initiatives, I now realize that I was just iterating on a fundamentally broken process. keep reading…

Nursing Jobs: Still Hard to Fill and Forecast Is It Won’t Improve

by May 6, 2014, 5:12 am ET

Most advertised nurse jobs 2014With National Nurses Week beginning today, Wanted Analytics took a fresh look at the hiring demand for nurses and found, to the surprise of no one who recruits and hires these professionals, that the number of advertised positions continues to rise.

The recession the nation is still climbing out of dampened demand at the end of the last decade, but since, hiring has come roaring back. Wanted’s report says the number of nursing jobs advertised online in the last 90 days was 18 percent higher than a year ago. Registered nurse was the most in-demand position, accounting for 63 percent of the posted jobs.

How many jobs does that represent? Wanted, which aggregates and analyzes help wanted postings from thousands of sites — corporate, agency, and job boards — reports there were 850,000 different nursing jobs online during the last 90 days. A little simple math tells us 535,500 of them were for RNs. keep reading…

Workforce Planning à la ‘Late Show’

by Apr 23, 2014, 12:12 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-04-22 at 7.02.34 AMIt’s no secret that being the front man on one of TV’s late night shows is a coveted role. Lately it seems like many of TV’s “funny men” are passing the torch to the next generation of comical geniuses. Jay Leno handed The Tonight Show over to Saturday Night Live alumnus Jimmy Fallon, and more recently the news of David Letterman’s retirement and Stephen Colbert as his replacement on the Late Show has been all the media buzz. Even comedian Chelsea Handler has reportedly been a replacement possibility for The Late Late Show’s personality, Craig Ferguson.

What these have in common is that the TV networks adequately prepare to handle changes to keep moving forward. Gaps in program scheduling can be a hefty cost for networks, and the same can be true for organizations with employment inconsistencies. keep reading…

Recruiting Against the Private Sector: What Government Can Do to Better to Compete for Talent From Campus

by Apr 2, 2014, 5:57 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-03-17 at 6.57.27 AMIn a previous article, we described the keen interest in employment in the public sector by millenials. Federal employment provides many of the most important attributes that students identify as attractive for their careers. This is evidenced by federal agencies being chosen among the top “ideal employers” identified in Universum’s student survey of tens of thousands of college students: the Federal Bureau of Investigation, National Institutes of Health, Peace Corps, Department of State, and NASA, to name a few. However, despite the appeal of public sector careers, most government agencies are quite inefficient in their recruiting and selection processes and consequently lose many top candidates to the private sector.

Compounding this handicap is the fact that the job market for new campus graduates has heated up once again. According to the 2014 National Association of Colleges and Employers survey, employers plan to increase their hiring from the class of 2014 by 7.8 percent for their U.S. operations. While the job market is certainly tough for some recent graduates, the most sought-after candidates are receiving multiple offers with higher salaries. Agency recruiting and hiring practices must change to effectively for the desired talent.

Here are 11 suggestions that the public sector might deploy that parallel successful practices in the private sector: keep reading…

Hire for Bench Strength or Brace for Failure

by Mar 25, 2014, 5:29 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-03-17 at 8.25.05 PMBaseball spring training is here, so it’s a perfect time for us to talk about the importance of an organization’s bench strength. When you think about all-time greatest baseball players, near the top of the list are legends Ted Williams, Ty Cobb, Ernie Banks, Rod Carew, Tony Gwynn, and Harmon Killebrew.

Guess how many World Series championships those Hall of Famers won combined? As many as you and me: Zero. Those players all set individual major league records, but their teams never won the ultimate prize.

Tying that point to our organizations, we can’t be satisfied having just a couple superstars on our team and no bench strength to support them. Ultimately, we won’t win. Our organizations won’t achieve key goals in a timely manner, and we run the risk of sliding backwards if we lose one of our superstars.

Too often, we hire people whose full potential and ambition are invested in performing the jobs they’re hired for. Then, when we need more from them, they’re not able or willing to go the extra mile.

Your goal should be to have at all times (or be working toward) at least one employee with the skills, personality, character, ambition, and technical competence to take over each key position in your organization right away. Without this, your company will be unable to attain its growth goals quickly, reducing future profits and opportunities for your co-workers to achieve their career goals.

Also, if a key player is incapacitated for a couple months or longer, your organization could be damaged. I learned that lesson the hard way when I was diagnosed with cancer. But I was fortunate that we had hired several high-potential people who filled in for me when I was sidelined by my surgery and chemo treatments.

Here are four important actions I suggest you take to improve your bench strength:  keep reading…

One Way to Tell How Many Job Candidates Are Graduating

by Mar 17, 2014, 4:35 pm ET

The largest schools for engineers in the Chicago area.

A company that helps employers examine the labor supply of such potential employees as truckers, nurses, and retailers, as well as physical therapists and women in IT, is out with a new tool for measuring the number of people graduating. keep reading…

Here’s How to Tell That Your Talent Is About to Quit

by Feb 24, 2014, 6:00 am ET

Quit Job keyboardEmployees who are serious about changing jobs give off cues that, if you know what to look for, can give you time to act before it’s too late.

These are not the kinds of tell-tale signals every manager recognizes.

“You might think that someone who starts showing up to work late, failing to return phone calls and emails, and taking lots of sick days might be about to leave, but those weren’t unique behaviors that applied only to the quitters,” says Tim Gardner, a Utah State University associate professor at the Jon M. Huntsman School of Business. Unlike a worker who starts taking days off in the middle of the week, or who prowls job boards, or inadvertently leaves a resume in the copier, the signs of a serious job seeker are more subtle. keep reading…

Millennials Are Attracted to Public Service, But Government Needs to Deliver

by Jan 22, 2014, 12:30 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-01-16 at 1.26.32 PMThis is not an easy time to be a public servant. Heated budget battles and rhetoric about the size, function, scope, and effectiveness of the public sector have generated criticism — not just of government, but also of the public servants who deliver government services.

It’s ironic that while the government is being criticized, Americans continue to ask public servants to solve some of our nation’s toughest problems: revitalizing the economy and putting people back to work, supporting a war that has stubbornly persisted for more than a decade, protecting the public, eliminating poverty, improving our education system, providing affordable health care, and so on.

This paradox — attacking public servants while also expecting them to solve problems other sectors can’t handle — presents an extreme challenge for government leaders and agencies as they strive to maintain or improve performance despite harsh criticism and shrinking resources.

The Government Talent Challenge keep reading…

Are You Wasting Your Time Sourcing Top Talent?

by Dec 20, 2013, 6:25 am ET

In this week’s roundup I address the issue of succession planning. Please pay attention, There will be a pop quiz. (Or not.)

As a talent acquisition professional (“recruiter” is so yesterday), your role in succession planning and workforce management is indirect, even if it falls on your shoulders to only source and present candidates who are the absolute best at doing the job for which you have a req.

Stick with me here for a minute as we walk through this hiring and succession moraine to reach the point where you will agree that the best plan is to fill promotions purely at random, while discovering that you and your colleagues are the only ones in the organization hiring people who must convince you they actually can do the available job. keep reading…

Bring in the Reserves: an Argument for Over-Hiring

by Jul 25, 2013, 6:34 am ET

Consider this scenario: A talent acquisition director makes a seemingly great hire for a specialized manufacturing role. However, several weeks after the new employee starts the job, another, better — actually, amazing — candidate is referred by a colleague.

The HR professional decided to bring in the late-coming candidate for an informal interview even though a true “job opening” no longer exists. After the decision makers interview the late-coming candidate, they acknowledged that he’s a perfect fit for the culture, qualified for several potential future opportunities in the firm, and a prime candidate for leadership grooming.

The talent acquisition director considers two options: keep reading…

Our Big Cleanup of Our Big Data

by May 8, 2013, 5:12 am ET

Screen Shot 2013-05-07 at 11.26.15 AMInformatica, the company for which I work, deals in big data challenges every day. It’s what we do — help customers turn their data into actionable business insights. When I took the helm as VP of global talent acquisition I was surprised to learn that the data within the talent acquisition function was not up to the standards Informatica lives by. Clearly, talent acquisition was not seeing the huge competitive advantage that data could bring — at least not the way sales, marketing, and research were viewing it. And that, to me, seemed like a major problem, but also a terrific opportunity!

This is the story of how Informatica Talent Acquisition became data-centric and used that centricity to our advantage to fix the problem. keep reading…

Advanced Items for Your Recruiting Agenda — What Should Google Do Next?

by Apr 22, 2013, 5:37 am ET

PhilipsDuring the newly reinvigorated and exciting ERE conference, two attendees posed related but powerful questions to me. The first was “What advanced topics should be on the agenda of recruiting leaders at elite firms?” Or as another put it “What should Google be planning to do next in recruiting?”

At least to me, future agenda items are an important topic. Because after visiting well over 100 firms, I have found a dramatic difference between the agenda items that are found on 95% of the firms (cost per hire, ATS issues, req loads, etc.) and the truly advanced subjects that only elite recruiting firms like Google, DaVita, Sodexo, etc. would even attempt to tackle.

So if you have the responsibility for setting agendas or recruiting goals, here is my list of truly advanced recruiting topics that elite leaders would find compelling but that most others would simply find to be out of their reach. If you want to be among the elite, you should select a handful for implementation. However, even if you are currently overwhelmed by your current agenda, you might still find them to be interesting reading.

25 Advanced Recruiting Topics for Bold Corporate Recruiting Leaders keep reading…

Planning an Efficient and Effective Corporate Recruiting Function

by Apr 4, 2013, 12:50 am ET

Building a house, a building, or a department all starts out with a plan. Many of us, however, don’t heed those textbook ideas of how we should start. Rather, we jump in and try to steer the ship while it is moving and frankly don’t know where it is going. As many have heard the adage, “If you don’t know where you are going, any road will get you there.”

A recruitment plan starts out with an agreed-upon strategic vision of what a corporate recruiting department is to accomplish. This must be a consensus of the immediate management chain as well as the people on the top floor. It has to start out with both a forecast of intended hires in a given time frame (a people budget) as well as an overall concept of operations … also known as just how are we going to accomplish our people budget and ultimately drive the operational budget which supports the execution of the concept of operations.

A “people budget” is just that: a budget. We all know that budgets are guidelines that become fluid depending on changes in the business. After all, all business is dynamic and things do change. Development of a “people budget” should be an ongoing activity of the recruitment department, perhaps polling divisions, departments, etc. to provide you with not only an anticipated number of potential new hires in the next three to six months but also a general breakdown of skill sets that you envision hiring.

Your departments will resist this exercise. keep reading…

Close the Talent Gap These 6 Ways

by Mar 21, 2013, 5:03 am ET

bigstock-Jump-7475814CEOs are frustrated. According to a ManpowerGroup survey, 34% of companies are experiencing difficulty filling mission-critical positions. Paradoxically, the Department of Labor reports that 12.3 million people are still unemployed. And so here we sit, asking ourselves, why are we struggling to find the talent?

Welcome to the Great Talent Gap of the 21st Century

In an article for Inc.com, Keith Cline wrote, “The demand for top-tier engineering talent sharply outweighs the supply in almost every market, especially in San Francisco, New York, and Boston. This is a major, major pain point and problem that almost every company is facing, regardless of the technology ‘stack’ their engineers are working on.”

If you’re a hiring manager or a recruiter in the trenches, you’re not seeing a way out of it any time soon  You may need a production manager who knows calculus, or an experienced software developer, or a technology strategist with cloud-based computing experience; and you need them yesterday. Oh and, by the way, you need them at a “competitive salary” (i.e., the lowest wage possible).

To begin to close the gap, we first need to recognize that the talent gap of the 21st century is made up of smaller fissures. Second, we need to understand the interrelated economic and organizational forces which formed these cracks. And lastly, we need to get started now. keep reading…

Saying You Can’t Find Talent Is Like Saying You Can’t Find Anything to Watch on TV

by Feb 5, 2013, 5:54 am ET

Screen Shot 2013-01-25 at 2.09.21 PMAs a child living in a rural area, I had but three, maybe four channels when the weather cooperated, to watch. Installing cable down our very long lane was not economically sensible, and my father sure wasn’t going to install one of those monstrous satellite dishes in the yard. So we watched network television through the slumping antennae on our roof and ignored the fuzzy lines that appeared on the screen whenever we ran the microwave. Despite my limited viewing capability, I could always find something for my viewing pleasure. Flash forward 25 years and I now have 150+ channels in addition to dozens upon dozens of DVDs from which to choose. Problem is, I can’t find anything I want to watch half the time.

Limit my choices and I can decide on something. Give me too many choices and I constantly search for what has got to be something better out there. The current so-called “talent shortage” mirrors this conundrum. For those not familiar with this idea of a talent shortage, it is born from the fact that 49% of current U.S. employers, according to a study conducted by Manpower, cannot find qualified people for their open positions. When you hear this statistic you perhaps jump to the conclusion that if companies can’t find qualified people, then qualified people must not exist. Hence, a talent shortage must exist.

This is flawed thinking.  keep reading…

How Capable Are Your Employees? 4 Indicators to Get the PICK of the Litter

by Feb 1, 2013, 5:12 am ET

commodoreHave you ever been stuck using a painfully slow and inefficient computer because it still worked?

Just a few weeks ago, I emptied my garage and office of over a dozen CPUs, printers, and monitors. The cargo area, back seat, passenger seat, floors of my SUV were filled with equipment and components. During the short drive to the local computer recycling center, I was struck by a strange thought: the similarity between these still working working-but-outdated computer hardware and many employees in jobs whose best days have passed.

The simple truth is these functional, reliable, and hard-working computers were no longer able to keep up with the tasks I needed them to do — and when they did, it took too long. Booting up took 5 to 10 minutes, sometimes longer. The operating systems — you know the Windows “stuff” like Windows 98, Vista, and even XP — kept crashing. The CPUs took too long to process information. They couldn’t handle new software upgrades. The hard drives were full and the boards couldn’t support new ones. The modems needed to be replaced because good, consistent high-speed connections required new versions. And let’s not forgot the 15-inch black-and-white monitors. Need I go on?

That same resourceful philosophy for many of us, my friends, doesn’t stop with computers. Many workforces today are filled with loyal, dependable, hard-working employees whose skills don’t match the needs of the organization anymore. keep reading…