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talentmanagement RSS feed Tag: talentmanagement

Proprietary Metrics — the Next Big Thing in Talent Management

by
Dr. John Sullivan
Apr 14, 2014, 5:39 am ET

The idea that you can create a template that will work forever doesn’t happen in any business … There’s some really, really bright people in this business. You can’t do the same thing the same way and be successful for a long period of time. — Billy Beane

Screen Shot 2014-04-10 at 8.57.20 AMI am a strong advocate of what I call “parallel benchmarking,” which is borrowing the proven best practices from completely different industries and functions. This article advocates the borrowing and the adaptation to talent management of what are known as “proprietary metrics” from the baseball industry. Proprietary metrics get their name because they cover metrics that are so powerful that they are “owned” and their components are therefore not shared. In baseball, there are dozens of proprietary metrics, while in the corporate world of talent management, they are surprisingly rare. Corporate examples of these proprietary metrics include Google’s “retention metric” for predicting which employees are about to quit and its “hiring success algorithm” for predicting the characteristics that lead to new hire success on the job.

Baseball Has the Most Advanced Metric Model to Learn From keep reading…

The Who-What-Where-Why-How of Vying for Talent

by
Mark Tortorici
Apr 10, 2014, 5:33 am ET

Every few years or so, it happens. Someone declares a “War for Talent,” battle lines are drawn, and then candidate poaching begins. While some of this is a little sensationalist, it’s also very true. Any company who wants to attract the best and brightest, and also the best personality and culture fit, must set themselves apart. Since there are many companies all vying for the same types of candidates, the landscape can get cluttered.

So let’s talk about who, what, where, why and how: keep reading…

If You Want Empathy, Talk to Your Dog, Not Your Manager

by
John Zappe
Apr 4, 2014, 5:19 am ET

giraffe empathyEmpathy is not a skill recruiters and hiring managers include on job descriptions, which explains why it’s in short supply among American managers.

How do we know this? Because the leadership coaching and outplacement firm Lee Hecht Harrison did a survey asking workers about their manager’s empathy. “How would you rate your manager’s ability to demonstrate empathy for employee situations?” was the question. Virtually non-existent, was the answer of 52 percent of the respondents.

“Empathy isn’t a weakness, but fundamental to good management,” says Kristen Leverone, senior vice president for LHH’s Global Talent Development Practice. keep reading…

Hire for Bench Strength or Brace for Failure

by
Jim Roddy
Mar 25, 2014, 5:29 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-03-17 at 8.25.05 PMBaseball spring training is here, so it’s a perfect time for us to talk about the importance of an organization’s bench strength. When you think about all-time greatest baseball players, near the top of the list are legends Ted Williams, Ty Cobb, Ernie Banks, Rod Carew, Tony Gwynn, and Harmon Killebrew.

Guess how many World Series championships those Hall of Famers won combined? As many as you and me: Zero. Those players all set individual major league records, but their teams never won the ultimate prize.

Tying that point to our organizations, we can’t be satisfied having just a couple superstars on our team and no bench strength to support them. Ultimately, we won’t win. Our organizations won’t achieve key goals in a timely manner, and we run the risk of sliding backwards if we lose one of our superstars.

Too often, we hire people whose full potential and ambition are invested in performing the jobs they’re hired for. Then, when we need more from them, they’re not able or willing to go the extra mile.

Your goal should be to have at all times (or be working toward) at least one employee with the skills, personality, character, ambition, and technical competence to take over each key position in your organization right away. Without this, your company will be unable to attain its growth goals quickly, reducing future profits and opportunities for your co-workers to achieve their career goals.

Also, if a key player is incapacitated for a couple months or longer, your organization could be damaged. I learned that lesson the hard way when I was diagnosed with cancer. But I was fortunate that we had hired several high-potential people who filled in for me when I was sidelined by my surgery and chemo treatments.

Here are four important actions I suggest you take to improve your bench strength:  keep reading…

The Top 1% Recruiting Gap — Why Most Firms Have Surrendered to Google

by
Dr. John Sullivan
Mar 17, 2014, 5:09 am ET

A think piece designed to stimulate your thinking on competing against the top 1 percent firms for top talent

If you’re an executive interested in recruiting, here is a scary thought to consider. For the first time in your lifetime: As a result of their compelling approach to managing talent, the elite 1 percent of firms now have a powerful recruiting brand advantage. The resulting “recruiting brand gap” between the top 1 percent and the remaining 99 percent of firms is now so wide … that most firms have given up trying to match the talent approach of the 1 percent.

The Top 1 Percent of Firms Have Unique Talent Differentiators keep reading…

Who’s to Blame for the Perfect Fit Syndrome ?

by
Ira Wolfe
Mar 6, 2014, 5:09 am ET

An employer trying to hire the perfect candidate is in many ways a good thing. It’s a significant improvement from the days of hiring anyone who could fog a mirror. But has the pendulum gone too far?

The answer is a resounding yes. A perfect candidate does not exist. He never has, he never will. The best any manager could hope for is the candidate who has many of the essential skills and experiences, lots of potential, a willingness to learn and develop continuously, and is engaged with and by the culture. That’s a tall order — a very tall order and one that many managers take to extremes.

The result of falling victim to The Perfect Fit Syndrome is that sometimes these positions are never filled. I’ll admit that might be the extreme case but it’s also not so uncommon.  Many managers place the sole blame on the poor quality of job applicants.

But that’s a cop-out and one excuse that senior management has bought hook, line, and sinker.  keep reading…

Talent Management Lessons From the Super Bowl for Corporate Leaders

by
Dr. John Sullivan
Feb 3, 2014, 6:36 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-01-30 at 10.43.50 AMA couple years back I was asked to outline “the future of talent management” in a talk at Google headquarters. Then as now, I predicted the future of talent management will follow the “professional sports model,” which many of you undoubtedly witnessed during yesterday’s Super Bowl.

Some in HR carelessly make the mistake of instantly dismissing sports analogies as irrelevant, but those individuals fail to understand that the NFL and its teams are multibillion-dollar businesses with the same economic bottom line and the need to dominate competitors as any other corporate businesses. So if you want some talent creds, tell your boss that you watched the Super Bowl not just for enjoyment, but also in order to learn some valuable talent management lessons. My top eight talent management takeaways from the Super Bowl are listed below. keep reading…

How Prepared Are You For This Year’s Flu Season?

by
John Zappe
Jan 16, 2014, 1:42 am ET

flu map 1.2014With this year’s flu season already widespread and, in some areas, turning increasingly deadly, employers are being urged by OSHA to encourage their sick workers to stay home.

Now deemed widespread in 35 states, and regionally extensive in several more, this season’s influenza outbreak has not yet reached the pandemic stage, but, says the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, if the flu outbreak of 2009 is any guide, most workplaces will not be ready if it does. keep reading…

Recruiting Great Talent Is the Core of the Netflix HR Revolution

by
John Zappe
Jan 15, 2014, 5:59 am ET

NetflixHow did Netflix reinvent HR? In one word, “Recruiting.”

“Hire, reward, and tolerate only fully formed adults,” writes Patty McCord in the Harvard Business Review. “The best thing you can do for employees — a perk better than foosball or free sushi — is hire only “A” players to work alongside them. Excellent colleagues trump everything else.”

If you hire the right people, so much of what companies do in the name of human resources becomes, if not superfluous, at least of much less importance. keep reading…

This Tool Will Help You Rethink Talent Acquisition

by
Erik Smetana
Jan 15, 2014, 12:49 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-01-06 at 1.43.52 PMRegardless of mission or vision statements, the ultimate goal of any high-performing HR function — and or its “talent fulfillment” group — is to provide the support, resources, and expertise to help their organization acquire, develop, and retain top talent — a responsibility that starts with strategy, focuses on acquisition, and never ends.

Talent fulfillment — the act of identifying, acquiring, and retaining top talent – can mean different things to different organizations and HR professionals. It could be hiring external recruitment agencies, temporary employees, contractors, or some combination thereof. That said, those organizations operating with that mindset, unless in the midst of a significant growth phase, aren’t likely to meet anyone’s definition of high performing. High performance means finding talent, growing talent, securing talent, and keeping talent — your organization’s own talent.

This is sort of like a short-order cook and a baker.  keep reading…

Calculating the Dollar Costs of a Bad or Weak-performing Employee

by
Dr. John Sullivan
Jan 6, 2014, 5:43 am ET

Almost every manager, when asked, readily agrees that weak employees underperform average employees by a significant amount. We certainly know from sports teams, where performance is easily measured, that there is a huge performance differential (often double or triple) between the below average, average, and top performers in the same position.

From a talent management perspective, if the “performance differential” between the average employee and the worst employee is small (less than 5 percent), it doesn’t make much sense to spend a lot of money on performance management programs. However, when weak performers produce more than 33 percent below the average, it makes clear business sense to invest in great performance management and recruiting in order to fix or replace weak performers.

And when your calculations reveal that employee actions can have a multimillion-dollar impact (in the negative direction, with the Edward Snowden NSA document leaking case, or in the positive direction, with the US Airways Sully Sullenberger safe landing on the Hudson River), you quickly realize the need to quantify the dollar impact of these bottom- and top-performing employees.

Begin Working With the King of Metrics keep reading…

2014: The Year of the Employee

by
Josh Bersin
Jan 3, 2014, 2:58 am ET

We just completed our ten big predictions for HR, talent, and learning in 2014 and the theme is “The Year of the Employee.” Global economic growth will cause the balance of power to shift, allowing top talent to exert more control. Top people with key skills (engineering, math, life sciences, energy) will be in short supply due to global economic growth. Thanks to new U.S. healthcare laws, people also will feel more free to change jobs.

For the first time in more than five years organizations are competing for talent — and the formula for success this time is different. To compete for key talent, organizations will need to adapt and innovate.

With that, the challenges and opportunities will employers face in 2014: keep reading…

How an Improved 2014 Economy Affects Recruiting

by
Ken Sundheim
Dec 18, 2013, 6:00 am ET

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, unemployment in the United States has continually dropped over the past year. As of November the number dropped to 7 percent, down from 7.3 percent.  We must ask ourselves how the improved economy affects employer recruiting initiatives.

While organizations should maintain the same overall headhunting strategies as in any other economy, some adjustments are necessary.

Take a look at the challenges hiring managers ought to expect when bringing on employees. Only when we define these hurdles is it possible to formulate and implement strategic solutions to over-leap them.

Three Challenges keep reading…

NFL Highlighting How ‘Problem Generators’ Affect These 5 Components of Your Business

by
Fletcher Wimbush
Nov 14, 2013, 9:45 am ET

Screen Shot 2013-11-13 at 11.20.45 AMFootball, and in particular the NFL, is a big part of my life. Not only do I enjoy the game and all it has personally done for me, I enjoy all the lessons about business management it has to offer. In the latest rounds of NFL scandals the Miami Dolphins offensive lineman Richie Incognito was accused and tried in the media for work place harassment. It has caused another valuable member of its offense of line, Jonathan Martin, to quit the team and create a storm of controversy about the culture of the NFL locker rooms. Is this commonplace? Is it generally accepted behavior for professional football players? Probably not. As this controversy continues, we may find out differently. From what many of the experts are saying this is simply a case of mismanagement, and a player or players out of control.

In the business world, degrees of “problem generators” like Incognito exist; these are the people with the bad attitudes masked by talent. In some companies they are more prevalent than others. Many organizations actually seek to eliminate these problem generators and prevent them from ever being hired using some of the techniques and tools suggested in this Simple Guide to Interviewing for Attitude. One bad apple can cause a lot of damage, and the evidence is obvious when the promising Miami Dolphins lose to the winless Tampa Bay on Monday night mostly due to the loss of two key players.

Problem generators create host of subtle but extremely damaging side effects. Here are my top five areas that are affected the most by a problem generator. keep reading…

6 Talent Management Lessons From the Silicon Valley

by
Dr. John Sullivan
Nov 4, 2013, 6:42 am ET

Screen Shot 2013-10-31 at 12.32.22 PMNo matter where I travel around the world, people are extremely curious about the unique talent management practices of Silicon Valley. Over my 30+ years of working in the Valley, I have tried to distill the best talent management practices of great firms like Facebook, Google, and Apple (as well as the practices of many of the startups) into what I call “the Six Drivers of Talent in the Silicon Valley.” If your firm wants to innovate and move fast, you should consider adapting at least some of these talent drivers in your own firm. keep reading…

Get Rid of Your Bad Hires Quickly With a ‘No-fault Divorce’ Process

by
Dr. John Sullivan
Oct 28, 2013, 8:00 am ET

upset couple - from NIH's websiteEveryone knows that the average hiring process is less than perfect. In fact, most selection processes have high failure rates (i.e. even after months or even years of “assessment,” nearly 60 percent of the marriages in California end in divorce).

So it shouldn’t be a surprise that as many as 46 percent of new hires fail within 18 months, according to Leadership IQ. Research also reveals that 61 percent of new hires are unhappy because they feel that they had been misled during the hiring process, according to Harris Interactive. The Recruiting Roundtable similarly reports that 50 percent of the hiring organizations or the new hires themselves regret the decisions they made. Shifting to non-exempt workers, research by Humetrics reveals that 50 percent of all hourly employees quit or are fired within their first six months.

Given this high rate of mishires, it’s surprising that most corporations don’t even track mishires who must be terminated or encouraged to resign. Even fewer organizations have a formal “early release process,” like a no-fault divorce for identifying bad and frustrated hires and releasing them as soon as possible.

Why You Should Release Weak Hires and the Disgruntled as Soon as Possible keep reading…

Winning ‘the War to Keep Your Employees’ Requires Re-Recruiting Your Top Talent

by
Dr. John Sullivan
Oct 21, 2013, 6:28 am ET

If you expect to win “The War to Keep Your Employees,” you must continually assure that the best offer that a top performing employee receives comes from inside your own firm.

In order to assure that, management must periodically approach top talent and recruit them again (re-recruit) just as if they were a new external prospect. Although I coined the term “re-recruit” more than 20 years ago, it is still an effective retention tool today. keep reading…

HR Survey: Streamlining Healthcare HR Is Top Cost Initiative

by
John Zappe
Oct 10, 2013, 6:35 am ET

Healthcare HR initiatives survey 2013Streamlining their own processes is the first choice of HR healthcare professionals when it comes to reducing costs.

More than planning for the implementation of the Affordable Care Act, and even more than cutting hiring and onboarding costs, including that perennial cost-cutting favorite, temp staffing, 73 percent of HR professionals put streamlining HR processes at the top of the list.

The Healthcare HR Initiatives Survey, however, suggests a disconnect of some sort between recruiters and other healthcare HR staff. At the most senior level, 80 percent of HR VPs and other executives said preparing for healthcare reform is a top HR initiative to reduce costs. By comparison, only 27 percent of the recruiters participating in the 450-respondent survey said that. keep reading…

We’ve Got to Stop Over-promising and Under-delivering, or Retention Will Suffer

by
Adi Bittan
Oct 8, 2013, 6:15 am ET

It’s natural to do everything you can to convert a potential candidate you’re interested in. However, mistakes made during recruiting process and in the onboarding stage can lead that person to leave early.

Recently, a friend of mine left his job after 18 months. He had spent four months looking for a job and deciding that one was the right fit. He even relocated to a new state to take it. He was as excited about it as can be. So what happened? keep reading…

Implementing Actionable Predictive Analytics in Talent Management

by
Dr. John Sullivan
Oct 7, 2013, 5:01 am ET

metrics scanI’ve been espousing the need for predictive metrics in HR for over 20 years, so I am pleased that more talent leaders are now beginning to realize their value. Unfortunately, most of what is written on the subject tends to be very general and instead what is really needed are some how-tos and some implementation tips.

In my first article on the subject, I covered the benefits of predictive metrics and the need to add actionable components, so that predictive metrics drive action and actually improve people-management decisions. In this article I will outline those actionable components and highlight the specific areas where you might need predictive metrics. keep reading…