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screening RSS feed Tag: screening

5 Reasons Job Hoppers Make Great Sales Reps

by Dec 11, 2014, 5:49 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-12-02 at 11.06.19 AMAlthough recruiters are traditionally warned to stay away from job hoppers, many employers now expect candidates to have a history of job hopping. In fact, a recent survey from CareerBuilder shows that 55 percent of employers reported hiring a job hopper.

Why are recruiters ignoring the advice to avoid flighty employees?

For one, jumping from job to job is common. The CareerBuilder survey found that by age 35, 25 percent of full-time employees have held five or more jobs, while 20 percent of those ages 55 and older have had 10 or more jobs.

But there is a deeper explanation. Employers see the value job hoppers can bring to certain positions. For example, workers who frequently switch from job to job may have the personality and experience needed to excel as a sales rep.

Here are the top five reasons to consider hiring a job hopper for your open sales rep position. keep reading…

Why You Should Never Lose Your Identity When Recruiting

by Dec 9, 2014, 5:43 am ET

EREConf14_footerWhat makes a recruiter stand out: It’s a culmination of their personal experiences, intellect, intuition, and what made them who they are today. I call this experiencing rites of passage. Aristotle said, “Knowing yourself is the beginning of all wisdom.” Recruiting is not a transaction. The military teaches that attention to detail is critical in all actions performed. This is where the wheat is separated for the chaff. If a seasoned recruiter doesn’t see a full, professional representation on a resume — it speaks a lot of the candidate. If the skill set is essential, maybe it is a matter of spending some time with the candidate to educate them on the importance of a well-defined resume.

When you’re in the people business, it’s all about understanding an organization’s needs and improving the return on human capital. Statistics reflect that the best hires are typically referrals. There are obviously a number of reasons why, but one is that an existing employee can comprehend a person’s motivational fit and drivers to the point that they’re confident the candidate will be interested and contribute to the results. Recruiters can do this with both internal and external candidates.

The same thing goes for establishing relationships with people and understanding the ‘who’ vs. throwing resumes at the wall. keep reading…

Hire Self-Motivated People — the Single Smartest Thing a Hiring Manager Can Do

by Nov 10, 2014, 5:55 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-11-06 at 3.12.11 PMHow recruiters can become a hero of your hiring managers by dramatically reducing the number of hours that they have to spend motivating and watching their employees 

If you are a corporate manager, you already know that you routinely spend a significant portion of your time trying to motivate your employees. On average, I estimate that encouraging, cajoling, and the worst part, having to hang around just to ensure that your employees are continuously working takes up to 50 percent of the average manager’s time each week. If you don’t believe my estimate, ask a few managers to keep a work log for a few weeks if you want an accurate time for your firm. You might go a step further and ask a few of your managers if they enjoy trying to motivate and if they are good at it, because you’re likely to find that they dread every minute of it.

Fortunately you can recapture every minute of that “motivation time” if you just do one simple thing: begin recruiting and hiring self-motivated employees. These type of employees are not a myth. They are called self-motivated or intrinsically motivated people. Imagine what it would be like as a manager to have a team full of employees who not only automatically did the work that they were assigned but who would also proactively seek out new work that needed to be done.  keep reading…

10 Reasons a Video Interview Could Replace a Phone Screen

by Nov 6, 2014, 12:13 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-10-17 at 10.20.01 AMAfter watching over a hundred video interviews, I’ve come to believe they can replace the traditional phone screen, especially for positions with a high volume of applicants.

Recently, I reluctantly tried video interviewing for campus recruiting and found it to be a fabulous success that exceeded expectations. However, when the concept was initially presented there was a healthy dose of skepticism. It was one of those rare occasions when you communicate to your team that the trial is not really optional. Since then we’ve also been using it outside campus recruiting, primarily when the demographic is millennials or Gen Y and the applicant volume is high. Like most people, I initially stuck my nose up at the idea of losing the personal touch of a two-way conversation, but these brief interviews reveal so much about candidates.

Our skeptics have quickly become converts. This fall alone, we’ve screened three times as many people in about 80 percent of the previous time commitment. I would never have believed it if I had not tried it. The technology still has its faults, but I certainly think it’s headed in the right direction (I’m pushing our vendor to develop more functionality).

Typically the format for one-way (asynchronous) video interviews goes something like this: after screening a resume, you send out an email invitation to a candidate to participate in a video interview. The email contains a hyperlink which takes them to a website where they view pre-recorded short video clips of people asking interview questions. After each clip, candidates have a pre-determined (and brief) amount of time to think about the question, after which their webcam automatically begins recording their answers which are then saved for your viewing. Typically there are no re-takes.

Here are 10 positives: keep reading…

Recruiting in the Purpose Economy

by Oct 10, 2014, 12:45 am ET

Psychology TodayPurpose.

It’s what employees and job candidates, particularly the millennial generation, want in their work. And it’s what companies need in their teams to produce the goods and services millennials and others want to buy.

Employers are starting to find clues to help them attract people with purpose. keep reading…

What Soft Skills Are

by Oct 3, 2014, 12:03 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-09-10 at 6.13.54 AMTo some, soft skills are code for corporate culture; for others they are the emotional side of working well together as a team and being a team player. Yet to others it represents specific skills that companies spend large amounts of money to develop within their people.

I ask companies small to large what kinds of skills they are looking for in their new recruits.  They often start the conversation by saying “I can teach the hard skills specific to my organization or industry but what I really need are people that are problem solvers, can work in teams, can communicate well, have learned how to learn, and can lead teams.”

What they are saying is they need 21st-century skills or what we are calling soft skills. These five skills below are the essence of soft skills, and every company, no matter its size will either succeed or fail in the 21st century based on how well these skills are developed and used in their organization.

Let’s look at five soft skills and the role they play in your success. keep reading…

The Problem Might Not Be the Hiring Manager. It Might Be You.

by Oct 1, 2014, 12:26 am ET

U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Amber E. N. Jacobs/ReleasedYour talent acquisition team has been tasked with finding someone to fill a tough, high-profile, technical hiring need in engineering or science or information technology. The position is open for a while and your company’s senior leadership is getting nervous because the skill set is urgently needed on a mission-critical project.

Qualified candidates aren’t applying. Significant man-hours are being put into sourcing and recruiting for the role. Finally, an interested candidate is identified whose resume looks promising. She does well on her initial phone screen and is brought in for an interview. Things look good but then comes the hiring manager’s feedback. keep reading…

Worker Drug Test Positives Rise for First Time Since 2003

by Sep 11, 2014, 12:14 am ET

Quest drug test 2013 resultsAfter a decade of slowly declining workplace drug test results, Quest Diagnostics said the trend reversed last year with more workers testing positive, particularly for marijuana and amphetamines.

Although the total positive results are small — of 7.6 million urine tests 3.7 percent were positive — it does represent a 5.5 percent increase from 2012′s 3.5  percent positives and it is the first increase since 2003, when 4.5 percent of the samples found traces of drugs. keep reading…

Experience Is Overrated — Arguments for Hiring Talented Individuals Without Perfect Credentials

by and Sep 8, 2014, 12:09 am ET

Southwest Airlines listening centerOrville Wright did not have a pilot’s license –slogan used at Facebook to warn hiring managers not to overly focus on credentials

I, the lead author, have 40 years of experience working in the talent space. But given that experience, I still don’t understand why recruiters and hiring managers place such an unwavering emphasis on hiring only individuals with “direct experience” (i.e. experience working with the specific job title that they’ve applied for). So despite my extensive personal experience and education, I agree with the conclusion reached by Google, Facebook, and most startups that many of the best hires are those whose education, experience, and other credentials are not a perfect “fit” for a job opening.

The Track Record of Those With No Direct Experience or Weak Credentials Is Impressive keep reading…

Refusing to Hire Overqualified Candidates – a Myth That Can Hurt Your Firm

by Aug 25, 2014, 12:31 am ET

Imagine being assigned a physician and then purposely rejecting them solely because they were “overqualified” for your medical situation. Well that’s exactly what happens when hiring managers reject candidates who have “too many” qualifications.

There is simply no excuse in this new era of data-based recruiting to adhere to this old wives’ tales” in hiring. I have written in the past about the cost of rejecting “job jumpers” and in this article, I will focus on the false assumption that hiring candidates who are “overqualified” will result in frustrated employees who will quickly quit. There is simply no data to prove any of the negative assumptions that are often made about overqualified prospects or candidates.

There Are No Proven Performance Issues Related to Being Overqualified keep reading…

Don’t Listen to the Naysayers — You Do Need Creatives

by Aug 15, 2014, 12:56 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-07-03 at 9.57.56 AMIf you’re not a “creative,” you’ve probably been annoyed by a creative’s lack of organization or follow-through at some point. You may even be reveling in the recent onslaught of articles arguing that creative employees only waste time and money.

But no matter how “Type A” you are, you can’t afford to overlook creatives’ potential in this increasingly innovation-focused market. keep reading…

Why Social Job Matching Will Replace Talent Assessment Tests

by Jun 5, 2014, 12:43 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-05-22 at 10.43.34 AMTalent assessment continues to grow as a legitimate business tool. Times have never been better for those who provide and use talent assessment solutions. Despite the seemingly infinite complexities that can come with the territory, companies of all shapes and sizes are realizing the business value of using assessments to support insight on quality of hire.

As good a tool as talent assessment is, it remains old fashioned and continues to have trouble getting out of its own way. The real disruptive force in quality of hire will take the form of “social job matching.” keep reading…

Examining Zappos’s ‘No Job Postings’ Recruiting Approach — Innovation or Craziness?

by Jun 2, 2014, 12:01 am ET

Inside Zappos profile pic - updatedThe new recruiting “no job postings” website of Zappos is truly unique.

First off, you have to give the Zappos team credit for eliminating anything in recruiting, because we have a long history in recruiting of adding but never subtracting approaches.

The new talent community declares the end to job postings and the painful transaction between applying for a specific job and getting a cold rejection. It further offers the opportunity to become “a corporate insider,” where you join the firm’s exclusive “talent community,” made up of interested prospects and applicants. In essence its own social network that the firm can use to keep in touch with applicants over time. It can also use the information that you provide during the increased interactions with recruiters to find the right job for you, even if it’s outside the typical jobs that you would have applied for.

This article critically analyzes this new approach in order to highlight possible advantages and problems with this approach for others that may be considering a similar move. keep reading…

Steps for Increasing Your Speed of Hire in Order to Improve Your Quality of Hire, Part 2 of 2

by May 5, 2014, 2:06 am ET

This continuation of the two-part article covers specific actions that corporate recruiters can implement to speed up their hiring during each individual step of the recruiting process. Part 1 covered the cost of slow hiring and some advanced steps on how to improve the speed of the overall hiring process.

Speed Improvements for Each Major Step of Recruiting keep reading…

Recruiting High School and Non-degreed Top Talent — A Missed Corporate Opportunity

by Mar 3, 2014, 5:43 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-02-26 at 12.55.50 PMIn case you didn’t hear about it, college football powerhouse Alabama recently offered a scholarship to eighth-grade football player Dylan Moses and LSU offered a scholarship to a ninth grader. Before you react in shock as a parent might, consider the fact that teenage talent may be the last remaining untapped corporate recruiting pool.  keep reading…

Moneyball and Recruiting: The Future of Hiring or Pie in the Sky?

by Feb 20, 2014, 12:29 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-02-19 at 9.31.09 PMMoneyball is getting to be the new buzzword in recruiting. We’re supposedly on the cusp of a data-driven revolution in hiring. And it seems one is sorely needed, judging by the state of hiring practices today.

When NASA was just getting started many of the engineers that were hired were chosen only on the basis of their resume and cover letters. That was the norm for many jobs up until the 1950s. Interviews were not common for jobs where the candidates were located far from the worksite — the cost of travel, and even long-distance calls, made them unaffordable. Then employers started using all types of assessments, which would suggest that hiring must have improved dramatically over the 50 years that have elapsed.

One would be wrong to reach that conclusion. keep reading…

LinkedIn Buys Job Matching Company as It Plans for Jobs Posting Boom

by Feb 6, 2014, 7:22 pm ET

4th Q job board financials 2013LinkedIn made a sort of history today. For the first time since going public three years ago the company’s stock price dropped even though LinkedIn beat Wall Street’s expectations for earnings and revenue, and, for good measure, announced it had acquired a fast-growing matching-based job board for not much cash.

Reporting its fourth-quarter financial performance after the markets closed this afternoon, LinkedIn said it earned 39 cents a share on revenue of $447.2 million. The company simultaneously announced it had acquired Bright.com, a two-year-old startup that matches jobs to seekers by scoring the latter on how well they fit the position.

The $120 million price will only require LinkedIn to come up with about $36 million in cash, a pittance for a company with $803 million in the bank. The balance will be in LinkedIn stock, which, after dropping more than 7 percent in after-hours trading, is now around $207 a share. keep reading…

I Filled a Job You Didn’t Know You Had

by Feb 4, 2014, 6:27 am ET

OK, so you’re a hiring manager, and you’ve just arrived at the office, grabbed your coffee, and opened up your email inbox. There — in boldfaced lettering — the subject line of my email screams

JOB PROPOSAL MEMO.

And you’re thinking … great. Another spam from some job seeker. But you open it anyway.

And that’s how my story at Beyond.com began. keep reading…

Hiring Employees Who Are ‘Customer-Ready’

by Feb 3, 2014, 12:55 am ET

The Age of the Customer is the title and the focus of Jim Blasingame’s new book. I like the tagline even more — Prepare For The Moment of Relevance.

This got me thinking about manpower — human capital — whether are our employees capable of preparing for that moment of delivering service in an epic way? Moreover, how does the organization consider this in the hiring and recruiting process — hiring employees who are “customer-ready” and prepared to deliver exceptional service in that moment of relevance.” keep reading…

Judging the Voice: The Reality of Phone Interview Bias

by Jan 24, 2014, 6:44 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-01-20 at 8.42.21 PMWhat do you have in common with Cee Lo Green, Christina Aguilera, Blake Sheldon, and Adam Levine? If you spend time searching for top talent, quite a lot! After all, with the rise of HR phone screening and first-round phone interviews, recruiting is beginning to resemble the blind auditions on the blockbuster TV show, The Voice.

On The Voice, blind auditions ensure that talent is judged fairly, with no bias based on their appearance. On the recruiting front, the voice of a job candidate could unwittingly cause bias or at least weigh heavily on the decision-making process of an interviewer.

Now, some would say that candidates actually benefit from phone screenings because initial decisions are not influenced by a candidate’s appearance or body language. However, research suggests that many candidates’ voices could sway first impressions and damage their chances for a second interview. After all, it’s human nature to make silent judgments about people based on how they speak.   keep reading…