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recruiters RSS feed Tag: recruiters

I, Robot: How Vulnerable Are Recruiters to Automation?

by Jan 28, 2014, 12:25 am ET

self driving car

A recent study from Oxford University suggests that almost half of all job categories are at some risk of being automated within the next 20 years. That includes telemarketers (99 percent certainty); accountants (94 percent), real estate agents (86 percent); airline pilots (55 percent), and even actors (37 percent).

At low risk are jobs like clergy (0.8 percent); dentists (0.4 percent) and recreational therapists (0.2 percent). What is a recreational therapist anyway? The authors of the study don’t define the job, but it sounds suspiciously like an euphemism for a profession popular in Nevada, which would explain the low probability of the job being automated.

The study doesn’t mention recruiters except to say that big data analysis will result in better predictions of performance, especially of students, and will make recruitment more efficient. keep reading…

The No. 1 Error That Experienced Recruiters Make

by Jan 8, 2014, 5:45 am ET

recruiting targetsIn many ways, experience is a good thing. As a recruiter, you probably are used to looking for experienced candidates and even might use someone’s experience as the tiebreaker when evaluating prospects and candidates. In your own career, you may have highlighted as a key, competitive advantage. And when I am flying, I like having an experienced pilot.

However, after working with many recruiters, I have observed a mistake that is almost epidemic — especially among more experienced recruiters.

So what turns your experience as a recruiter into a liability? keep reading…

The Mastery of Recruiting?

by Jan 7, 2014, 6:41 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-01-02 at 8.40.18 PMMy wife and I watched a fine documentary on TV called Jiro Dreams of Sushi. It was about an 85+-year-old master sushi maker named Jiro Ono who has a 10-seat restaurant in the Tokyo subway. He probably makes the best sushi in the world, and maybe ever. He only serves sushi, and it costs about $300 for 20 pieces. He’d been doing it for about 75 years. The documentary talked about his life, his approach to work, his family (his two sons were in the business), and people who knew/interacted with him.

Here are some interesting quotes (with some editing from me) from the movie. After that, I’ll tell you what this means to you, the recruiter or human resources professional.  keep reading…

Who Are the Despicable Mes in Recruiting?

by Dec 23, 2013, 5:56 am ET

Bits of carbon on a white background (carbon totem)The combination of the popular “Despicable Me” movies and the Christmas season made me think about who in the recruiting process should get “a lump of coal” in their stockings for their naughty behavior. Obviously any list like this that identifies problem-causers involves some generalizations, because there are always some individual exceptions. However, in any field there are individuals who hold certain job titles that all-too-often remind me of the lead character Gru in the Despicable Me movies.

Those who qualify for the Despicable Me label on my list include recruiters, other individuals who impact recruiting, and even a few recruiting tools. I’d like to open what I hope is a continuing discussion with my personal “Despicable Me top 10+ list”. The list is broken into two categories: recruiters and those who contribute to the recruiting effort.

You May Be a Despicable Me Recruiter If You Are … keep reading…

On Becoming a Better Recruiter

by Dec 19, 2013, 6:00 am ET

Screen Shot 2013-12-12 at 9.58.56 AMImprovement begins with I. – Arnold Glasow

Congratulations to the great recruiters out there who work hard day after day to find the people required to build great companies. Examples:

Like your IPad or your BMW? We recruited the engineers to make them a reality. Use Word or Excel? The folks we recruited made it happen and their efforts have changed the face of how we do business. Blog or tweet or fly in a plane or stay wired all day long? You can do that because great recruiters built the workforce that built the technology to keep us all productive and connected.

Identify and hire nurses, airline pilots, and executive chefs? We do that too as all good things start with the recruiting of great talent. We are the magic behind the miracles in everything from the astonishing efficiency of Amazon to the recruitment of interim CFOs who can support liquidity events or take a company through an IPO. We staff the phone stores that sell the smartphones you can’t live without. We hired the folks to design and build those phones as well. I can go on but I think you get the point.

With the new year starring us in the face, we need to be many things in order to get ready for the challenges that are to come. We need to be on our game in terms of understanding the business in which we work. We need to think both short and long term to maximize the value we bring. We need to be proactive, fast, and connected as we chase the very best people. With this in mind, I suggest that we consider the following as a to-do list for those who want to take their game uptown and create more value: keep reading…

Attitude vs. Aptitude — Why There Are No Excuses in Recruiting

by Nov 12, 2013, 5:59 am ET

I have always told my hiring managers that there is no such thing as a position that cannot be filled. This is a bold statement, and many of my newer hiring managers or hiring managers who are new to working with me are taken back by this statement. Some find it to be over confident, even arrogant at times.

My belief is that as a recruiter, as long as you truly understand the business and hiring manager needs, you will be able to effectively manage unrealistic expectations, narrow focuses, and that you as a recruiter are completely capable of coaching and mentoring your client to accurately affect their ability to truly understand their core recruiting needs. keep reading…

Increasing Your Power in Conversations With Hiring Managers and Clients: An essential sales skill every recruiter must develop

by Oct 23, 2013, 6:45 am ET

your way my way.jpgThere you are — ready to pitch your rock star candidate to your hiring manager or client. You are excited about your ability to snag this great prospect in record time, and you are proud of the fact that your candidate is well-qualified for the position. You left a brief message, letting your client or hiring manager know you have found a great prospect. A call is scheduled. You pick up the phone to dial.

As the phone rings, you gather your notes and are feeling confident and prepared; your pitch is bulletproof. As you announce yourself and prepare to share your great news, you hear, “Sorry, but I only have a couple of minutes. All I need to know is if the person you referred to is experienced and will be negotiable on salary.”

You are speechless. Actually, your rock star does not have the exact experience and might not be open to a lot of salary negotiating. Nonetheless, you push forward — trying to recover quickly by reciting the list of the other great things you learned about your prospect, confident these factors will win over your hiring manager or client. But you can’t shake off feeling weak, frustrated, and doomed.

Not the way you envisioned the call going? How’s your confidence now? And what about that bullet-proof pitch? In 29 words — 143 characters — (about a Tweet), you became the victim of the will of your hiring manager or client.

What just happened? More importantly, can you recover? Let’s look at both of these questions and use some basic sales skills to provide some help. keep reading…

Actually, Recruiting is Not HR Anymore

by Sep 5, 2013, 6:42 am ET

Recruitment, now widely referred to as talent acquisition, has and continues to evolve enough that we are really have become our own animal, not a cage in someone else’s zoo. keep reading…

7 Deadly Sins of Recruiting: Surefire Ways to Lose Applicants

by Sep 3, 2013, 6:45 am ET

Screen Shot 2013-08-23 at 9.58.26 AMThe theory that recruiting great employees is highly difficult is true, but what if your firm was making the recruitment process more complex than it had to be?

Almost one out of every four decisions that a small to mid-size company will make during a recruitment process will hinder their chances at staffing competitive talent. The consequences of these actions can result in a myriad of ill-fated outcomes, ranging from higher salary costs and wasted time to losing competitive applicants altogether.

Firms that are unable to streamline the staffing process on a regular basis are probably prone to committing one or more of the following seven deadly sins of recruiting:  keep reading…

A Recruiter’s Values

by Aug 16, 2013, 6:14 am ET

What do we stand for?

What is it we do as recruiters? Fill jobs? Source candidates? Use ATS, social networks, job boards, etc? An excellent recruiter and friend of mine — John Amodeo — has a great answer. John says we’re in the life-changing business. Think about it. When we fill a job we’ve transformed somebody’s life, hopefully for the better.

This is the human side of our work, which it seems many of us ignore. I’m just as guilty of this. It’s easy to lose sight of that in the shuffle when we’re neck deep in Linkedin, Facebook, video resumes, and all the other cool technologies we use. I was fortunate to start my career in recruiting managing a team of recruiters, never having hired anyone myself. At the time candidates were just resumes to me. It wasn’t until later that I became a hands-on recruiter. That was when I realized recruiting was more than moving documents and tracking a process. keep reading…

The Little-known Secret to Recruiting Success: 1 Question You Must Ask Yourself

by Aug 15, 2013, 6:43 am ET

new and improved.jpgFor today’s recruiters, there’s no shortage of new. New ideas on how to become better recruiters. New systems. New conferences. New tools. New techniques. New tips. New “best practices.” New processes. New blog posts. New communities of practice. New social media sites. New articles (dare I say, like this one!). New thought leaders. You get the idea.

Savvy marketers know how seductive new can be. Companies count on hooking buyers with that “new and improved” label on an otherwise very familiar product. Just for fun, I did a Google search using the words “new and improved” and found 57,500,000 matches! Notice the subtlety here — the implication that new implies better.

I am not arguing against the importance of “newness” for today’s serious professionals. I, too, love “new.” New ideas and new technology can be powerful game changers. But lately I have been wondering: if we want to continue to grow in our professions, is it simply “all about new”? And does new necessarily imply better?

Do “all things new” guarantee you a first-class seat on the non-stop flight to recruiting excellence? Stated another way, is the right question, “How well do I take advantage of ‘all things new’ in the recruiting profession?” Or is there another, perhaps better, question? I think there is. And you may be surprised to see it’s a question that is hidden in plain sight. But first a brief story. keep reading…

How the Role of Corporate Recruiter Is Evolving

by Aug 1, 2013, 6:09 am ET

Calling yourself a recruiter doesn’t do justice to what “recruiters” have to do. Here’s a quick overview of where the role was, where it is now, and where it’s heading. keep reading…

Recruiting Chief Now HR Chief at CACI

by Jun 24, 2013, 3:26 pm ET

Larry CliftonAside from the Phoenix-like return of Raghav Singh to the pages of this website from a horrific accident, there’s one more tidbit of news about familiar faces to the recruiting field, this one about Larry Clifton.

Clifton, the former recruiting head at national-security contractor CACI, has been named the chief human resources officer and executive vice president.

If his name or face sound familiar, it may be hardware-related. CACI has won several recruiting excellence awards in recent years; this year for its technology work and for two years in a row it was honored with the department-of-the-year award.

Develop a Hiring Manager Scorecard … to Make Them More Accountable (Part 1 of 2)

by Jun 24, 2013, 6:06 am ET

Few in the corporate world would argue against the fact that the actions of hiring managers have a significant impact on hiring. In fact, I estimate their impact to be over 50 percent (with recruiters and the corporate employer brand covering the remaining impacts). But unfortunately, I estimate that less than 5 percent of corporate hiring managers are formally assessed or held accountable for their contribution to the hiring process. What is needed is a hiring manager scorecard.

The goal of this scorecard is obviously to identify “problem” hiring managers but it is also to learn and then share the best practices of top-performing hiring managers with all other managers in the corporation.

After setting your overall functional goals, recruiting leaders need to develop these four items.

  1. Develop hiring and overall recruiting process metrics
  2. Develop recruiter competencies
  3. Develop an individual recruiter scorecard
  4. Develop a scorecard covering individual hiring managers.

I have covered the first three items in recent ERE.net articles, so this one will focus on a hiring manager’s scorecard.

The Benefits of Assessing Hiring Managers keep reading…

Develop a Recruiter Scorecard … Because Champions Demand That You Keep Score (Part 2 of a 2-part series)

by Jun 17, 2013, 6:07 am ET

How to develop a recruiter scorecard for assessing individual corporate recruiter performance

Champions insist that you keep score. If you understand that concept, you will ensure that in addition to function-wide metrics, you will supplement them with a scorecard for assessing the performance of each individual recruiter. Everyone knows that corporations are measurement crazy, so I have found that by not measuring something (in this case recruiters), you are inadvertently sending a message to executives and employees that whatever you are doing is not strategic or even important (because if it was, we would measure it).

So unless you want to purposely send a message that “having top performing recruiters doesn’t matter,” you have no choice but to develop an individual recruiter scorecard. In order to do that effectively, you first need to understand the foundation design principles for individual scorecards and then you must select the actual measures that you will use in your scorecard. In part one, I introduced the concept and provided three examples of what a scorecard might look like. In this part two, I will cover the design details and a list of the measure to consider for your scorecard. keep reading…

Develop a Recruiter Scorecard … Because Champions Demand That You Keep Score (Part 1 of a 2-part series)

by Jun 10, 2013, 6:45 am ET

Sample recruiter scorecards 

Champions insist that you keep score. If you understand that concept, you shouldn’t be surprised that one of the best ways to separate champion recruiters from weak ones is to bring up the topic of assessing individual recruiter performance. The worst corporate recruiters and way too many third-party recruiters that I have come across almost instantly react negatively to the topic of individual accountability. Their protests usually include some variation of three different excuses which are, “professionals don’t need to be measured,” “recruiting is too subjective or soft to measure,” or “it’s not my fault, others are to blame.”

In direct contrast, the very best in sports, sales, academia, high tech, entertainment, and yes, corporate recruiting, not only love to have their performance measured but they also like it to be compared and ranked against their peers. If you are a corporate recruiting leader and you want to know which recruiters to reward or to keep (I recommend that you release those who complain the loudest about individual accountability), you need to move beyond broad recruiting department metrics and dashboards and to also develop a “recruiter scorecard” for assessing the performance of every individual recruiter. keep reading…

Comparing the Competencies Between a “RINO” and an Exceptional Recruiter

by Jun 3, 2013, 6:44 am ET

Recruiting is a unique field because it has no entry barriers. Unlike most professions, you can become a corporate recruiter without any formal certification, registration, recruiting experience, or even a college degree in the discipline. Because becoming a recruiter requires no formal qualifications, you probably won’t be surprised to find out that in practice, there is a wide variation in the capabilities of individuals who hold the corporate title of “recruiter.” Many corporate recruiters are truly outstanding, but unfortunately in some corporations, many other recruiters can only be classified as what I call a “Recruiter In Name Only” or a RINO (pronounced as rhino). keep reading…

How to Build a Business Case for Your Recruitment Spending

by May 28, 2013, 6:42 am ET

voltron-logoWhat did your company spend on hiring last year? If you’re really not sure, you’ve got plenty of company. Given the decentralized talent acquisition model that many companies use, it’s nearly impossible to pinpoint the actual spending — and the true return on that investment. This is just one rather startling finding that we confirmed last year when we conducted our first annual Corporate Recruitment Benchmark Survey.

Survey participants included both executives and candidates, and they shared a number of eye-opening facts including:

  • There are strong disconnects between hiring concerns and priorities
  • Only 9 percent of the candidates were happy and not looking
  • IT had an unemployment rate of 3.3 percent
  • Most companies have fewer than two recruiters
  • 36 percent of companies either do not know how they track hiring or do not track at all

To illustrate some of these key findings, and other common corporate talent acquisition challenges, we invite you to meet Eleanor. Her story is fictional, but the challenges she faces are anything but. keep reading…

Why You Can’t Get A Job … Recruiting Explained By the Numbers

by May 20, 2013, 5:03 am ET

Is your “six seconds of fame” enough to land you a job?

As a professor and a corporate recruiting strategist, I can tell you that very few applicants truly understand the corporate recruiting process. Most people looking for a job approach it with little factual knowledge. That is a huge mistake. A superior approach is to instead analyze it carefully, because data can help you understand why so many applicants simply can’t land a job. If you can bear with me for a few quick minutes, I can show you using numbers where the job-search “roadblocks” are and how that data-supported insight can help you easily double your chances of landing an interview and a job.

Your Resume Will Face a Lot of Competition keep reading…

Recruiters’ Favorite Wastes of Time

by May 10, 2013, 6:39 am ET

We often read about a variety of supposedly recruiting-related topics which are designed to have in-house (either full-time or contract) recruiters “do better.” We typically work on 15-25 requisitions at a time, putting in 45-60 hours of work/week for immediate hires. Consequently, if it doesn’t directly lead to helping us “quickly and affordably put more/better quality butts in chairs,” these topics are wastes of our time.

A number of these suggested topics/tasks are useful (if not vital), and others aren’t. However, when we recruiters aren’t “drinking from a firehouse,” we’re wondering how soon they’ll lay us off, so in neither case can we work on these useful tasks. It would be valuable to have a company say to us:

We’re slowing down a bit now, so we’ll have you work on these other important tasks you haven’t had time to do up to now to keep you working for awhile.

Many companies are unable/unwilling to do this, and would rather lose our accumulated knowledge and practice and start all over again in the future with some largely/wholly new crew.

Anyway, back to those favorite wastes of time we’re supposed to do in the negative-5 to negative-20 hours of free time we have during the week: keep reading…