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recruiters RSS feed Tag: recruiters

Score Some Winning Insight From a Sports Recruiter’s Perspective

by Sep 16, 2014, 12:59 am ET

Mel playing soccerRecently, I’ve become immersed in some unfamiliar recruiting territory — collegiate sports! As I work with my son, a student athlete, to navigate the college exploration process, I’m noticing many similarities between these two worlds of talent search.

Last month, I met Jay, a sports recruiter/scout who has placed numerous incredible college athletes through the years. Many of his “picks” have gone on to play sports professionally. Jay and I spoke at length about our industries and I asked him the secrets to his success as a recruiter, albeit in another realm.

If you find solutions to your professional challenges by looking to other industries, read his valuable perspective on sports recruiting success, as well as my related observations. keep reading…

Recruiting Isn’t Enough Anymore; Business Advising is the New Norm for Corporate Recruiters

by Sep 11, 2014, 6:43 pm ET

Screen Shot 2014-09-11 at 3.02.46 PMMost recruiting leaders have had coffee-shop or happy-hour conversations with each other about “having a seat at the table” or being a “more strategic partner” to the business. There is no doubt these clichés are played out (and there’s a good chance you’re rolling your eyes at the thought of reading another article about this). The truth is, there are talent-acquisition departments that talk about having a seat at the table; heck, they might even lobby so hard to get to this “table” they get a pity invite.

But, for as many of those that are worrying about a “table” there’s the other side of the house: departments hard at work building teams that help their business use human capital to win in the marketplace.

This is no easy task. It’s a grind. But there’s great work going on in our industry right now by many talent-acquisition leaders showing a commitment to this approach.  Some of those very leaders you’ll meet at ERE next week.

At CDW, we built a high-performing talent acquisition team by developing business- and HR-savvy recruiters. keep reading…

What Successful Recruiters Are Doing Right

by Aug 13, 2014, 12:02 am ET

team_leader_free_stock_photo_bYesterday I listed seven operational habits that characterize unsuccessful recruiters. In this second part, I examine not only the actions that distinguish the successful recruiters, but also the talent mindset that must be adopted. It is the capacity to embrace a “paradigm shift” in your recruiting philosophy that really determines how successful you will be in your talent acquisition efforts.

First, let’s stop fooling ourselves.  keep reading…

What Unsuccessful Recruiters Are Doing Wrong

by Aug 12, 2014, 12:12 am ET

 recruitment-sample-mdMost strategic recruiters seek to optimize the three most important factors in talent acquisition — cost, time, and quality. However, that objective is often impossible to accomplish because recruiters continue to use outdated talent processes which were designed back in the 1980s.

Stephen Covey, in his ground-breaking best seller — 7 Habits of Highly Effective People – introduces timeless principles that form the framework of the changes that individuals must adopt to become more effective. But, before one can embrace the seven habits, Covey proposes adopting of a “paradigm shift”– a change in perception and interpretation of how the world really works. Similarly, recruiters must be willing to adopt a paradigm shift in how they view the world of talent acquisition — if they hope to be successful in sourcing, recruiting, and hiring the very best talent in today’s war for talent.

For example, it has been my experience that “average” to “good” recruiters follow similarly dated talent strategies:  keep reading…

Recruiter Development as an Exercise in Cooperation: Donate Yourself!

by Jul 22, 2014, 12:25 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-06-03 at 5.11.44 PMIf you work in recruiting in any capacity, ask yourself this question: “When was the last time someone really invested in making me better?”

Then give yourself the responsibility of that development for someone/everyone around you.

Why would we do that? Who has time for that? Where should I start? If this is what comes up top of mind, you might owe it to yourself to put some thought into this topic. I’ll tell you why I think it’s not only a business imperative but a preservation technique as well. keep reading…

Don’t Call Recruiting Recruiting

by Jun 6, 2014, 12:18 am ET

Who the recruiting department should report to is one thing. Then there’s the whole issue of what this department should be called.

In the State of Recruiting Survey, we asked, “What’s your preferred ‘label’ for the corporate (in-house) department that handles recruiting?

You said: keep reading…

Your Recruiting Job Got Harder

by May 9, 2014, 12:01 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-05-02 at 7.15.51 AMWe could go around in endless circles — and on TV and the Internet it is done — about whether the economy and the job market is getting better or whether looks are deceiving.

As far as recruiters are concerned, however, there’s evidence that the act of filling a job has gotten a bit harder over the past year. keep reading…

In-House Recruiting Survey Unveiled This Morning at ERE Conference

by Apr 23, 2014, 3:47 pm ET

Grade B slideWith a self-assigned grade of B, and an even lower C+ from the hiring managers whose jobs they fill, recruiting leaders from companies large and small heard the news there’s much to do to improve those scores, and that the road is not going to get easier in the year ahead.

Speaking to the opening session of the ERE Recruiting Conference & Expo here in San Diego, ERE’s CEO Ron Mester told the hundreds of talent acquisition leaders in direct language that “You have a lot of work to do to improve … No one should be satisfied with a C+ or a B.” At another point in his hour-long presentation of a broad and extensive ERE survey of recruiters, their leaders, their bosses, CEOs and hiring managers, Mester said it will take a rethinking of the process to get to an A. “Rethink it,” he urged. “Challenge everything that you’re doing today.”

Unveiling some of the findings of the late March survey completed by more than 1,300 during his State of Recruiting presentation, Mester turned a spotlight on the disconnect between what the respondents agree should be the key measures of recruiting’s performance and what recruiting leaders and their teams believe is where the actual emphasis lies. keep reading…

Incentivize Recruiters for a More Successful Hiring Process

by Apr 17, 2014, 12:26 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-04-15 at 1.23.47 PMThe candidate experience has become one of the most talked-about areas for improvement in the recruitment industry, in large part thanks to Gerry Crispin, who in 2010 announced his idea for the Candidate Experience Awards for Recruiters and Private Sector Employees. The idea was to develop a program to recognize and reward those companies who were providing a good experience to their recruiters and candidates.

Oddly enough, not a lot of attention seems to be paid to giving incentives to the people who actually provide the experience to candidates: recruiters. keep reading…

Job Boards, Recruiters Are Top Source of Job News for IT Engineers

by Mar 11, 2014, 9:00 am ET

Glassdoor_RecruitSoftwareEngineersNot having any luck reaching out to software engineers? Here’s some advice from Glassdoor: Keep trying.

Seventy percent of engineers say recruiters are one of the most common ways they hear about new opportunities. Friends, social media, former co-workers — nothing ranks higher than recruiters for new job information, with the very narrow exception of job boards. But with only 71 percent giving them the edge, it’s a statistical dead heat. And, when you consider how accessible and ubiquitous the posting sites are, recruiters must be doing something right.

What they most value in a recruiter is transparency. By far the largest share (81 percent) of the respondents to Glassdoor’s survey of some 1,400 employed software engineers said they most value recruiters who tell them the pros and cons of different companies. Recruiters who fudge even a little run the risk of a turndown should the candidate discover the company isn’t quite as it was portrayed. Nearly every engineer in the survey — 97 percent — said they read the online reviews before they accept a job offer. keep reading…

Never Underestimate the Power Of Social Media

by Mar 4, 2014, 5:56 am ET

Not Kelly BlazekBeing Kelly Blazek has got to be so hard these days. When other Kelly Blazeks have to change their LinkedIn profiles to say they aren’t that Kelly Blazek, you just know things must be nasty for the Kelly who is that Kelly.

The Kelly who is that Kelly and the self-proclaimed “House Mother” of the Cleveland Job Bank became the target of international scorn after her nasty response to a 26-year-old marketing communications hopeful went viral. Besides denying Diana Mekota access to the popular local job bank, Blazek fired off a drippingly sarcastic email calling her “a total stranger who has nothing to offer me.” keep reading…

Recruiting Equals Knowledge Management

by Feb 25, 2014, 5:45 am ET

Knowledge management is defined as the efficient handling of information and resources within a commercial organization. That sounds a lot like the hiring process. Ultimately it is the goal of those involved in the hiring process to get all the relevant information to make an informed hiring decision. In this regard a lot of data is involved in recruiting. Consider a few ways everyone involved in the hiring process can improve his or her knowledge management efforts to improve the hiring process.

Hiring Managers keep reading…

Stop Throwing Recruiting Under the Bus!

by Feb 18, 2014, 12:27 am ET

There are thousands of startups in Silicon Valley who all aspire to be the next Google. Unlike Google, they don’t pro-actively invest in the resources to succeed or partner with recruiting to achieve this success. Instead they expect recruiters to work miracles in attracting top tier talent to their tiny ventures that are “disruptive.” keep reading…

The Top 20 Reasons Why Recruiting Is an Exciting and High-Impact Job

by Feb 17, 2014, 5:01 am ET

As a professor in a large business school, I am frequently asked, “What is the most exciting and impactful job in the corporate world?” While others may answer differently, to me the most exciting and impactful job is clearly recruiting.

It is full of excitement because every day as a recruiter you are in a head-to-head competition to attract top talent, and fortunately you know definitively within 90 days whether you have beaten the competition. The impact of a recruiter is twofold: first, you can literally change the life of an individual by placing them in their dream job, and second, you can effectively change the direction and the success of a corporation with a single great hire in a key job (i.e. recruiting LeBron to your NBA team).

So if you’re a college student ready to select a career or someone who is considering shifting into a new career field, I have compiled a list of the many reasons why you should consider becoming a corporate recruiter. keep reading…

How to Solve Your Recruiting Problems (and Where You Should Go to Do It …)

by Jan 31, 2014, 12:05 am ET

One of the prime purposes of ERE.net and other such forums is for advice and problem-solving. One thing that doesn’t often seem to get discussed is where someone should go for answers to recruiting problems, and that’s what I’ll talk about here. keep reading…

I, Robot: How Vulnerable Are Recruiters to Automation?

by Jan 28, 2014, 12:25 am ET

self driving car

A recent study from Oxford University suggests that almost half of all job categories are at some risk of being automated within the next 20 years. That includes telemarketers (99 percent certainty); accountants (94 percent), real estate agents (86 percent); airline pilots (55 percent), and even actors (37 percent).

At low risk are jobs like clergy (0.8 percent); dentists (0.4 percent) and recreational therapists (0.2 percent). What is a recreational therapist anyway? The authors of the study don’t define the job, but it sounds suspiciously like an euphemism for a profession popular in Nevada, which would explain the low probability of the job being automated.

The study doesn’t mention recruiters except to say that big data analysis will result in better predictions of performance, especially of students, and will make recruitment more efficient. keep reading…

The No. 1 Error That Experienced Recruiters Make

by Jan 8, 2014, 5:45 am ET

recruiting targetsIn many ways, experience is a good thing. As a recruiter, you probably are used to looking for experienced candidates and even might use someone’s experience as the tiebreaker when evaluating prospects and candidates. In your own career, you may have highlighted as a key, competitive advantage. And when I am flying, I like having an experienced pilot.

However, after working with many recruiters, I have observed a mistake that is almost epidemic — especially among more experienced recruiters.

So what turns your experience as a recruiter into a liability? keep reading…

The Mastery of Recruiting?

by Jan 7, 2014, 6:41 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-01-02 at 8.40.18 PMMy wife and I watched a fine documentary on TV called Jiro Dreams of Sushi. It was about an 85+-year-old master sushi maker named Jiro Ono who has a 10-seat restaurant in the Tokyo subway. He probably makes the best sushi in the world, and maybe ever. He only serves sushi, and it costs about $300 for 20 pieces. He’d been doing it for about 75 years. The documentary talked about his life, his approach to work, his family (his two sons were in the business), and people who knew/interacted with him.

Here are some interesting quotes (with some editing from me) from the movie. After that, I’ll tell you what this means to you, the recruiter or human resources professional.  keep reading…

Who Are the Despicable Mes in Recruiting?

by Dec 23, 2013, 5:56 am ET

Bits of carbon on a white background (carbon totem)The combination of the popular “Despicable Me” movies and the Christmas season made me think about who in the recruiting process should get “a lump of coal” in their stockings for their naughty behavior. Obviously any list like this that identifies problem-causers involves some generalizations, because there are always some individual exceptions. However, in any field there are individuals who hold certain job titles that all-too-often remind me of the lead character Gru in the Despicable Me movies.

Those who qualify for the Despicable Me label on my list include recruiters, other individuals who impact recruiting, and even a few recruiting tools. I’d like to open what I hope is a continuing discussion with my personal “Despicable Me top 10+ list”. The list is broken into two categories: recruiters and those who contribute to the recruiting effort.

You May Be a Despicable Me Recruiter If You Are … keep reading…

On Becoming a Better Recruiter

by Dec 19, 2013, 6:00 am ET

Screen Shot 2013-12-12 at 9.58.56 AMImprovement begins with I. – Arnold Glasow

Congratulations to the great recruiters out there who work hard day after day to find the people required to build great companies. Examples:

Like your IPad or your BMW? We recruited the engineers to make them a reality. Use Word or Excel? The folks we recruited made it happen and their efforts have changed the face of how we do business. Blog or tweet or fly in a plane or stay wired all day long? You can do that because great recruiters built the workforce that built the technology to keep us all productive and connected.

Identify and hire nurses, airline pilots, and executive chefs? We do that too as all good things start with the recruiting of great talent. We are the magic behind the miracles in everything from the astonishing efficiency of Amazon to the recruitment of interim CFOs who can support liquidity events or take a company through an IPO. We staff the phone stores that sell the smartphones you can’t live without. We hired the folks to design and build those phones as well. I can go on but I think you get the point.

With the new year starring us in the face, we need to be many things in order to get ready for the challenges that are to come. We need to be on our game in terms of understanding the business in which we work. We need to think both short and long term to maximize the value we bring. We need to be proactive, fast, and connected as we chase the very best people. With this in mind, I suggest that we consider the following as a to-do list for those who want to take their game uptown and create more value: keep reading…