Receive daily articles & headlines each day in your inbox with your free ERE Daily Subscription.

Not logged in. [log in or register]

offers RSS feed Tag: offers

Making an Offer: It’s Not All About the Money

by Sep 30, 2014, 12:58 am ET

Sometimes recruiters think that if they get the most money for the candidate, then the candidate will accept. But it’s not all about money, but more about making the candidate feel like they have a say in the hiring process and addressing their financial needskeep reading…

Win Over Your Hiring Managers

by Sep 18, 2014, 12:04 am ET

In a large or small organization, there is a need for a recruiter to take charge at times. Below are scenarios that occur in almost every organization. The key steps underneath will improve your time to fill, relationship with the hiring manager, and establish yourself as a trusted advisor.

Scenarios: keep reading…

There’s a New Way for Students to Tell Employers They’ve Got an Offer

by Sep 3, 2014, 2:46 pm ET

Screen Shot 2014-09-03 at 11.45.10 AMA new and unusual offering called “Explore Your Options” gives students a place to spread the word about their job offers. keep reading…

Too Slow or Too Low: Why Offers Are Being Rejected

by Jul 24, 2014, 12:36 am ET

Why offers rejected - MRI 2014It’s a job seekers market, but hiring managers haven’t yet fully adjusted to the change, with 40 percent of them taking almost a month to make an offer, only to find out in many cases that their candidate is turning them down.

Better than 8 in 10 of the MRINetwork recruiters participating in the semi-annual MRINetwork Recruiter Sentiment Study said today’s employment market is candidate-driven, a 25-point jump from the 2012 study. That means the professional, executive, and managerial candidates who are the majority of those recruited by MRI franchise offices can be more demanding when it comes to the nature of the work they want, the companies they’re willing to work for, and the compensation and benefits they’ll accept. keep reading…

15 Ultra-bold Recruiting Practices — Are You Falling Behind Your Competitors?

by Jul 14, 2014, 12:29 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-07-10 at 3.10.08 PMby Trena Luong and John Sullivan

In case you haven’t noticed, the world of corporate recruiting has become so intense that formerly rare aggressive and ultra-bold recruiting practices are now becoming mainstream. Of course as a professional, you know that you have an obligation to keep up with the latest practices, but your outdated recruiting approach is damaging your firm. Are you willing to explain to: your managers why you can’t hire top performers?;  your employees why they can’t work alongside the very best?; your customers why your products have outdated features?; and to your shareholders why your company can’t grow because of its inability to recruit top talent?

For a busy manager or recruiting professional, realize that the recruiting bar is being raised every day. Because we specialize in advanced recruiting practices, we have put together a quick list of examples of ultra-bold recruiting practices in order to demonstrate just how aggressive and bold recruiting has become. Each bold practice takes only a minute to scan and we assure you that most will be startled with how much recruiting has changed.

The Top 15 Ultra-bold Recruiting Practices keep reading…

Steps for Increasing Your Speed of Hire in Order to Improve Your Quality of Hire, Part 2 of 2

by May 5, 2014, 2:06 am ET

This continuation of the two-part article covers specific actions that corporate recruiters can implement to speed up their hiring during each individual step of the recruiting process. Part 1 covered the cost of slow hiring and some advanced steps on how to improve the speed of the overall hiring process.

Speed Improvements for Each Major Step of Recruiting keep reading…

The Top 12 Reasons Why Slow Hiring Severely Damages Recruiting and Business Results

by Apr 21, 2014, 12:14 am ET

A candidate from a well-known benchmark firm dropped out of our search for a General Manager position because the hiring manager took a week to respond to his interest. He said…

It’s not like I need their job. If it takes them a week to respond to a resume like mine for a job of this importance, they’re not the kind of company I want to work for. I move fast, and I can already see that my style wouldn’t fit their culture. –Wind River Associates

As a corporate recruiting leader, know that in a highly competitive college marketplace, there may be nothing that damages corporate recruiting results more than slow hiring.

Many firms now go the first step and track some variation of the “time-to-fill” metric. But despite that metric, not only are firms still almost universally guilty of painfully slow hiring, but to compound the problem, few recruiting leaders truly understand the many negative business and recruiting impacts that result from slow hiring. I estimate that the impact at most corporations exceeds tens of millions of dollars each year. And the dollar loss from this factor may be as much as 10 times higher than losses resulting from low recruiting efficiency related to the more popular “cost-per-hire” metric.

It’s not enough to be conscious and aware of slow hiring. Identify and then quantify in dollars each of the negative impacts of slow hiring, so that everyone from the CEO on down will support the streamlining of the process. After several decades of work on “speed hiring,” I have put together an extensive list of the negative consequences associated with taking too long to hire. The top 12 most damaging factors are listed below.

The Top 12 Reasons Why “Slow Hiring” Damages Recruiting and Your Business Results keep reading…

Time for Job Offers to Be as Exciting as College Admissions

by Apr 3, 2014, 5:05 am ET

college acceptance videoJust like a job finalist waiting for a decision, college-bound teenagers have been watching the mailbox for the telltale thick envelope that means “Yes.” Thin ones are usually bad news.

Some schools email their decision. Last week, the Ivies simultaneously released their decision online at 5 p.m. EDT Thursday. Other schools send confetti, or links to an acceptance video.

None, though, were more creative than the University of Southern California’s brand new Jimmy Iovine and Andre Young Academy for Arts, Technology, and the Business of Innovation. The accepted applicants each received a personal video with congratulations from Iovine and Young, better known as the hip-hop artist Dr. Dre. Iovine, Dre’s longtime associate, is a successful and well known music producer. keep reading…

If Barry White Were a Recruiter

by Mar 13, 2014, 5:45 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-03-02 at 2.43.43 PMNobody wants a selfish lover or a selfish recruiter, so take a lesson from Barry White and warm up your talent prospect before popping the question.

The business of recruiting is a unique one, but in many ways there are parallels to the dating game. Finding an appealing talent prospect is like spotting someone across a crowded bar: you have to be aware that any candidate you’re talking to is also being looked at/assessed by a at least a half-dozen other thirsty companies.

With what is probably a bombardment of attention, the prospect most certainly has his/her shields up — and rightly so. To establish that relationship you have to get around those shields and bring something to the table that makes you stand out from the crowd.

And that begs the question: what if Barry White were a recruiter? How would he approach talent?

Immediate Gratification vs. Performance keep reading…

How an Improved 2014 Economy Affects Recruiting

by Dec 18, 2013, 6:00 am ET

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, unemployment in the United States has continually dropped over the past year. As of November the number dropped to 7 percent, down from 7.3 percent.  We must ask ourselves how the improved economy affects employer recruiting initiatives.

While organizations should maintain the same overall headhunting strategies as in any other economy, some adjustments are necessary.

Take a look at the challenges hiring managers ought to expect when bringing on employees. Only when we define these hurdles is it possible to formulate and implement strategic solutions to over-leap them.

Three Challenges keep reading…

Recruiters: 3 Reasons Why Your Prospect Is Just Not That Into You

by Nov 22, 2013, 6:26 am ET

Screen Shot 2013-11-12 at 7.47.17 PMThe 2009 romantic comedy-drama film He’s Just Not That Into You portrays the lives of individuals who repeatedly misinterpret the behaviors of their romantic partners. Human behavior is complicated, unpredictable, and easy to misread.

In sales — as in recruiting — success depends on the ability to influence the behavior and decisions of others.

How sure are you that you can correctly read and understand your prospects or clients? Human behavior is not always logical or predictable.

Wonder how you can tell that a prospect may just not be that into you? keep reading…

How You Out-compete Rivals for the Best Talent

by Nov 8, 2013, 6:30 am ET

You’ve got to understand what your employees want.

Your employees too have desires and needs, of course. And these aren’t all the same. Your key hires and top management and team leaders have got to be getting what drives them out of the employment contract. Especially in sectors like technology, where there is low unemployment and an improving economy, the competition for top talent is acute.

Hiring managers need to understand that in this market to be competitive in acquiring top talent it might take some personalized creativity in the offer. All the competitive technology companies are offering the gamut of cool bennies: free lunches, complimentary gym memberships, flexible/virtual work opportunities, etc. And of course competitive compensation is always at the forefront of landing candidates. But these days some creative extras go a long way.

Tailor your employment offer. keep reading…

Increasing Your Power in Conversations With Hiring Managers and Clients: An essential sales skill every recruiter must develop

by Oct 23, 2013, 6:45 am ET

your way my way.jpgThere you are — ready to pitch your rock star candidate to your hiring manager or client. You are excited about your ability to snag this great prospect in record time, and you are proud of the fact that your candidate is well-qualified for the position. You left a brief message, letting your client or hiring manager know you have found a great prospect. A call is scheduled. You pick up the phone to dial.

As the phone rings, you gather your notes and are feeling confident and prepared; your pitch is bulletproof. As you announce yourself and prepare to share your great news, you hear, “Sorry, but I only have a couple of minutes. All I need to know is if the person you referred to is experienced and will be negotiable on salary.”

You are speechless. Actually, your rock star does not have the exact experience and might not be open to a lot of salary negotiating. Nonetheless, you push forward — trying to recover quickly by reciting the list of the other great things you learned about your prospect, confident these factors will win over your hiring manager or client. But you can’t shake off feeling weak, frustrated, and doomed.

Not the way you envisioned the call going? How’s your confidence now? And what about that bullet-proof pitch? In 29 words — 143 characters — (about a Tweet), you became the victim of the will of your hiring manager or client.

What just happened? More importantly, can you recover? Let’s look at both of these questions and use some basic sales skills to provide some help. keep reading…

5 Secrets to Effective Recruiting

by Oct 22, 2013, 6:17 am ET

Recruiting great employees is very difficult and, often is more complex than people perceive it to be. After running a headhunting firm for the past 10 years, I’ve learned that it is the little things which separate your ability to recruit the right job applicants.

Below, I’ve listed 5 of these secrets. keep reading…

Don’t Lose Great Job Candidates

by Sep 11, 2013, 6:33 am ET

If you are sitting here reading this, you are probably a top performer — the best seek out challenges, look to expand their knowledge bank, and have a strong desire for excellence. What most top performers aren’t looking for is to be sold on something they haven’t had the chance to fully investigate for themselves. After all, most of us are a bit standoffish around salespeople or when facing offers that seem too good to be true.

I recently saw a top-caliber financial analyst leave a company because a headhunter recruited him, offering a 20 percent increase in pay. This offer got the analyst through the door, but the prize at the end of the road blinded his vision of the dust storm ahead. keep reading…

7 Deadly Sins of Recruiting: Surefire Ways to Lose Applicants

by Sep 3, 2013, 6:45 am ET

Screen Shot 2013-08-23 at 9.58.26 AMThe theory that recruiting great employees is highly difficult is true, but what if your firm was making the recruitment process more complex than it had to be?

Almost one out of every four decisions that a small to mid-size company will make during a recruitment process will hinder their chances at staffing competitive talent. The consequences of these actions can result in a myriad of ill-fated outcomes, ranging from higher salary costs and wasted time to losing competitive applicants altogether.

Firms that are unable to streamline the staffing process on a regular basis are probably prone to committing one or more of the following seven deadly sins of recruiting:  keep reading…

The Right Tweet at the Right Time: Social Media Indicators for Real-Time Recruiting

by Aug 22, 2013, 6:14 am ET

Screen Shot 2013-08-12 at 3.10.45 PMYou know the old saying “the early bird catches the worm,” right? In the case of job recruiting, this phrase is particularly relevant. Any experienced recruiter knows that a highly qualified candidate who has multiple offers on the table needs to be targeted as quickly as possible.

But how exactly can a recruiter decide when it’s the right time to engage a candidate? How can recruiters monitor for indicators that a high-profile candidate may be open to a new opportunity, even before the candidate starts looking? Social media sites, because of their real-time nature, can be an incredibly helpful tool for not only building regular rapport with talent, but also helping recruiters find the right moment to engage with candidates for a new opportunity.

In this post I’m going to talk about a few ways I have used social media in the past to find real-time indicators for recruiting talent with the right timing. For the sake of brevity, I’ll be focusing on Twitter and Facebook (though this could easily be used for other social networks, too).

Opportunity Indicators on Twitter keep reading…

The Little-known Secret to Recruiting Success: 1 Question You Must Ask Yourself

by Aug 15, 2013, 6:43 am ET

new and improved.jpgFor today’s recruiters, there’s no shortage of new. New ideas on how to become better recruiters. New systems. New conferences. New tools. New techniques. New tips. New “best practices.” New processes. New blog posts. New communities of practice. New social media sites. New articles (dare I say, like this one!). New thought leaders. You get the idea.

Savvy marketers know how seductive new can be. Companies count on hooking buyers with that “new and improved” label on an otherwise very familiar product. Just for fun, I did a Google search using the words “new and improved” and found 57,500,000 matches! Notice the subtlety here — the implication that new implies better.

I am not arguing against the importance of “newness” for today’s serious professionals. I, too, love “new.” New ideas and new technology can be powerful game changers. But lately I have been wondering: if we want to continue to grow in our professions, is it simply “all about new”? And does new necessarily imply better?

Do “all things new” guarantee you a first-class seat on the non-stop flight to recruiting excellence? Stated another way, is the right question, “How well do I take advantage of ‘all things new’ in the recruiting profession?” Or is there another, perhaps better, question? I think there is. And you may be surprised to see it’s a question that is hidden in plain sight. But first a brief story. keep reading…

Watch Out for These 5 Onboarding Red Flags

by Aug 6, 2013, 6:42 am ET

red flagYou’ve just locked down the perfect candidate. You sourced and screened him; your client interviewed and loved him; you extended him an offer and he accepted — time to run a victory lap!

Not so fast. keep reading…

An IT Tech’s Blueprint For Hiring Talent Like Him

by Jul 31, 2013, 5:27 am ET

How does a team of technical co-founders recruit a top notch designer?

Maybe they realized it; maybe not. But whoever posted that question to Quora asked what every recruiter on the planet has wondered at one time or another: How can I recruit the best candidate for my job?

It’s a simple question, yet one to which there is neither a simple answer nor even consensus about just what combination of characteristics, background, skills, experience, personal traits, and so on make someone “the best candidate” or even a “top notch” candidate.

Yet right there on Quora, amidst the predictable suggestions about searching GitHub and hitting the networking circuits, is a blueprint for building a recruiting program to attract not only a coder-designer. but an entire team of tech talent. keep reading…