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Help Wanteds for Truck Drivers, Nurses, Retail Staying Online Longer

by
John Zappe
Aug 19, 2013, 3:17 pm ET

Wanted Job posting timeBased entirely on how long a job stays online, truck drivers and nurses are the toughest jobs in the nation to fill.

The latter is not much of a surprise. Newspapers, blogs, and healthcare networks are full of reports about how tough it is to to fill nursing jobs, particularly in such specialties as surgical, critical care, and emergency.

However, the difficulty in hiring truck drivers has gotten far less publicity even as recruiting experienced drivers has become tougher.

keep reading…

Fed Reserve Economists Say Two More Years Before We Get Back to ‘Normal’

by
John Zappe
Jul 22, 2013, 1:56 pm ET

fed reserve labor market chartUnless new economic shocks should upset the rate of improvement, it will take at least two more years before the U.S. labor market returns to its historic norms.

Crunching together 23 different labor market indicators, two economists with the sometimes-contrarian Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City said that though the rate of change is well above the average of the last 20 years, it hasn’t translated into an equivalent rate of improvement in labor market conditions.

What that means is that despite the acceleration in job creation, temp hiring, job availability, and other labor market measures, the national unemployment rate will continue to decline only slowly. keep reading…

Charting the Demand for America’s Top Jobs

by
John Zappe
Jan 17, 2013, 6:13 am ET

top 10 jobsWhen U.S. News issued its list of the 100 Best Jobs for 2013, its No. 1 criterion was hiring demand. After that came salary. Also factoring into the equation were work-life balance, stress, and the unemployment rate for individuals in each of the occupations.

Based on those factors, and a few others, dentist ranked at the top of the 100 Best Jobs list. Registered nurse was second, followed by pharmacist and computer systems analyst. Of the top 10 jobs on the list, six are in health care. The other four are in tech. (Telemarketer ranked at the bottom of the list.)

HR came in 72nd in the rankings, sandwiched between sales manager (71) and plumber (73). keep reading…

Young Veterans Are The Ones Most Likely to Be Jobless

by
John Zappe
Nov 11, 2011, 12:59 am ET

With every good intention, American employers are honoring the nation’s military veterans today with promises of jobs and redoubled recruiting efforts.

From Washington, where Michelle Obama announced yesterday that corporate leaders will hire 100,000 vets and military spouses in the next two years, to a Phoenix job fair today where Chase Bank is encouraging veterans to attend its job fair, the focus has been on addressing veteran hiring. Late Thursday, the U.S. Senate passed a veterans jobs bill.

Without a doubt, it is a worthy effort. But it is also one that faces challenges very much like those plaguing the civilian employment situation. The fact of the matter is that unemployed veterans look a whole lot like unemployed civilians: young and undereducated.

A second, smaller, but still substantial problem, is the one facing Reservists and the National Guard: multiple call-ups and the legal obligation to rehire them when they return from duty, makes many employers reluctant to hire them in the first place. keep reading…

Recruiter Analytics Are Not Just For HR Anymore

by
John Zappe
Oct 14, 2011, 2:49 pm ET

“We still have our work cut out for us in convincing companies how important it is to take a business intelligence mindset within HR.” That comment comes from Dr. Charles Handler, an I/O psychologist, who, contrary to the suggestion implicit in that comment, was actually encouraged by what he saw at HR Tech.

“After this year’s show I am smiling from ear-to-ear,” he wrote, in praise of how vendors are integrating and leveraging assessment data for “analytics and business intelligence.”

I saw what he saw, but from a different perspective; a perspective that encompassed the sweep of the showroom floor, and in-depth discussions with many of the largest vendors, and casual conversations with several others.  What I sensed, more than saw, was that HR analytics are being understood as more than a measure of recruiting productivity.

Wanted Technologies is an example of how vendors are providing tools to access data and show its cross-departmental value.

The other day, Wanted added salary ranges to its AnalyticsT platform. AnalyticsT is a data product designed specifically for recruiters. It can tell you on a very granular level what the market supply is like for specific jobs; how many of those jobs are being advertised at that moment; what the trends been; and who is doing the hiring and how many positions they have.

Now with the addition of the salary range, recruiters can compare the going rate in their locale — or elsewhere — to what they’re offering.

A valuable tool for recruiters? Certainly. But it would be a shame if that intelligence stayed with HR. As Wanted’s President and CEO Bruce Murray said, “Talk about a seat at the table… They (HR professionals) can provide competitive intelligence on a company and get very detailed about it.” keep reading…

Change Your Name and You Might Become a CEO

by
John Zappe
Apr 28, 2011, 1:14 pm ET

Here’s a little tidbit from LinkedIn that might help you answer a Jeopardy question or fill the conversational lull between discussing the Dodgers takeover and Lindsay Lohan’s upcoming stint in the morgue: Peter, Deborah, Bob, and Sally are among the most common names for CEOs.

It’s probably a totally meaningless analysis, but LinkedIn managed to get some PR mileage (and yes, I realize I’m playing right into that) out of scouring the 100 million profiles to find the most common CEO names.

If the research department had stopped there, it still would have warranted a water-cooler mention. But the team must have really had fun, since it dug into the various occupations and functional areas discovering such gems as: keep reading…

CareerBuilder Tool Can Show You Where the Fish Are Biting

by
John Zappe
Apr 19, 2011, 5:22 pm ET

Navistar builds trucks and buses, military vehicles and engines and chassis. Its equipment is tough and rugged with names to match; Workhorse, MaxxForce, ProStar+, and, for the military, the MaxxPro, Mine-Resistant Ambush Protected vehicle.

So when the company needs engineers, not just any engineer will do.

“The positions we look to fill are very specialized, niche positions within the industry pertaining predominately to engineering-level, engineering-focus, that really have (a) very small number of qualified candidates with the years of experience we’re looking for,” says Navistar recruiter officer Keith Sanderson.

That quote comes straight from an informational video about how Navistar, working with CareerBuilder, used a new service from the job board company to source, qualify, recruit, and hire engineers for a new facility it was opening.

Watch the video and you get the impression you’re hearing about a successful job fair. And you are. But listen closely as CareerBuilder’s Mary Delaney explains the success. What you’ll discover is a new tool from CareerBuilder that brings a little more science to the hunting and sourcing of candidates. keep reading…

Job Losses Continue To Mount, Pushing Unemployment to 8.5%

by
John Zappe
Apr 3, 2009, 1:01 pm ET

The Bureau of Labor Statistics played spoil-sport this morning, raining on Wall Street’s parade with a jobs report that said unemployment has officially hit 8.5 percent following the loss in March of 663,000 jobs. The loss is the equivalent of putting every person in Baltimore out of work.

The news, though expected, sobered Wall Street, where the Dow flirted with the 8,000 mark, before giving up nearly 40 points at midday.

Since December 2007, when the recession officially began, 5.3 million jobs have been lost, with the BLS pointing out, “Half of the increase in both the number of unemployed and the unemployment rate occurred in the last 4 months.” The unemployment rate is now the highest it has been since 1983.

The BLS also adjusted its figures for January, adding 86,000 more lost jobs to the 655,000 it had previously reported.

As bad as the job losses are, they only tell part of the story. A better measure of the pain workers are feeling is found in other parts of the BLS “Employment Situation” where the government reports that 9 million Americans are working part-time for economic reasons, the so-called “involuntary part-time workers.” Their numbers swelled by 423,000 during March

These are people like Ken Karpman, who was featured on ABC’s 20/20. He’s the Florida hedge fund founder who turned to pizza delivery after finding himself without a job and no prospects after going bust.

Now add to that another 2.1 million workers labeled as “marginally attached.” The BLS defines these people as individuals who “wanted and were available for work and had looked for a job sometime in the prior 12 months. They were not counted as unemployed because they had not searched for work in the four weeks preceding the survey.”

When these numbers are added to the 13.161 million officially unemployed it means 16 percent of the U.S. workforce is out of work or marginally employed.

“We’re closing in on 25 million people who are underemployed in one way or another,” Mark Zandi, founder and chief economist of Moody’s Economy.com, told the New York Times “It highlights the incredible breadth of the downturn.”

The Federal Reserve and economists expect the big job losses to continue for at least the next few months, although they differ on how much worse things will get. The Fed predicts unemployment to top out at 8.8 percent; many economists think it will hit 10 percent.

Profs Downbeat on ’09, But Urge Caution When Cutting

by
Todd Raphael
Nov 18, 2008, 5:36 am ET

For the next issue of the Journal of Corporate Recruiting Leadership, I asked business, econ, and finance professors what they expect out of the 2009 economy. They weren’t too cheery about the overall economy. But, when it came to the labor market, they suggested what recruiters already know: that the competition for top talent won’t let up much.

Here are some excerpts from that upcoming Journal.

From John Worrall, Rutgers University (pictured):

“My back-of-the-envelope guess is the unemployment rate will be North of 7% in 2009. Do I expect it to be at depression levels? No, I don’t.

I think HR managers will be deluding themselves if they think there will be less competition for talent simply because the unemployment rate is high. There’s a temptation to let people go during downturns — the stronger the downturn, the stronger the propensity for layoffs. They would be well-advised to consider carefully how much they have invested not just in key people but across the management spectrum. They’ve invested a ton in training formal and otherwise. That’s gone if they lose those people in a recession. They might not get them back.”

keep reading…

Veterans Make Good Hires Though Some Take Months To Find A Job

by
John Zappe
Nov 11, 2008, 3:48 pm ET

As America honors its military veterans, there’s news about the difficulties some vets have finding a job. A CareerBuilder (profile; site) survey says 1-in-6 vets report spending six months job hunting after leaving the service. About 1-in-10 say it took them a year to land a job.

Of the 750 vets surveyed for the report, about 20 percent said the biggest challenge to getting hired is the difficulty employers have in understanding just how transferable military skills are. Some of the vets also said they were at a disadvantage because they lacked a college degree, good interviewing skills, or there was just a lack of appropriate jobs in their area.

However, the news isn’t as bleak as the survey might imply. Bill Scott, with military recruitment specialist Bradley-Morris (profile; site), told us, “In our view, we still see this market as strong for veterans.” The U.S. economy has slowed hiring generally, acknowledges Scott, the firm’s VP of marketing and business development. But there are ”many opportunities (for veterans). There are employers who want to hire veterans.”

keep reading…

$11 Trillion Flowing Into World Financial System Means Jobs, Lots of Jobs!

by
Jon Hefferlin
Nov 11, 2008, 5:32 am ET

Eleven Tril is the equivalent of 9.5 months of our Gross Domestic Product ($14.3 Tril a year), or 2 1/2 months of the world GDP! ($54 Tril). And while we are in the throws of a seemingly major recession, there will be a lot of jobs created.

Yes, $11 Tril has been or is planned to be injected mostly into the world banking system, starting with the Bear Stearns bailout in March, and more recently the $700 billion bailout bill passed by Congress. European central banks are contributing an estimated $2.8 Tril, and our own Federal Reserve some $5.6 Tril to offshore banks, mostly in “swaps” (our dollars for their currency) to unclog the world banking system which almost ground to a halt in early October. This will regenerate loaning ability, and letters and lines of credit. While Q4 might be the worst since 1980, this avalanche of money suggests a quick recovery starting in Q1 or Q2 of 2009.

A small percentage will go directly back to taxpayers in a second round of rebates, some to help 3 million subprime “victims” keep their homes. This has spawned a “cottage industry” of loan mitigation and modification services, sadly sometimes employing the same subprime brokers who orchestrated the crisis.

Eleven trillion is a lot of money, and hundreds of thousands of jobs will be created, a lot of them in banks, regulatory authorities to monitor disbursements, and loan modification companies. Yes, many are being laid off, but many will find new jobs created by this massive flow of money.

My suggestion to fellow recruiters looking for new business? “Follow the money.”

Despite The Numbers, This Is A “Different” Kind Of Recession

by
John Zappe
Nov 11, 2008, 5:18 am ET

What’s worse than losing the presidential election? Winning it three days before the unemployment rate jumps to 6.5 percent after the U.S. economy loses another 240,000 jobs.

That bit of bad news was released by the Bureau of Labor Statistics confirming fears that the economy is in a recession that is only deepening.

Yet for the recruiting industry, Jeremy Eskenazi, founding principal of Riviera Advisors (profile; site), says, “I think this whole recession is different than in the past.”

keep reading…

More Monster

by
Todd Raphael
Nov 11, 2008, 12:15 am ET

As we mentioned, Monster moved to the New York Stock Exchange today. A couple of videos from today feature Monster’s CEO Salvatore Iannuzzi. In one video, on CNBC, he says, “When everyone says things are bad, it must mean it’s pretty much the time when things will start to turn around. So I’m more optimistic than negative.”

Similarly, in a Bloomberg video, embedded below, he notes that “the slowdown has been going on for nine months or longer … and I’d like to think we’re somewhere in the middle” of it, headed toward the end.

keep reading…

How Companies May Respond to the Economy

by
Todd Raphael
Nov 7, 2008, 1:03 pm ET

From October 15 to 24, 2008, Towers Perrin surveyed human resources executives and staff at more than 450 companies, asking what they’re likely to do now that the economy’s quite a bit less peppy than it was. Seventy-nine percent of the companies have more than $1 billion in annual revenues.

How Companies Are Likely to Respond to the Economic Crisis

Very
likely

Somewhat
likely

Somewhat
unlikely

Very
unlikely

Too soon
to tell

Cut travel and entertainment spending

41%

33%

12%

6%

8%

Freeze or reduce hiring

36%

26%

15%

13%

10%

Scale back holiday parties and/or other employee events

32%

26%

20%

13%

9%

Reduce pay/merit increase budgets

26%

23%

22%

18%

11%

Reduce training budgets

17%

30%

24%

15%

14%

Targeted reduction in headcount (focus on less critical roles or
lower performers)

22%

24%

17%

22%

15%

Reduce annual incentives/bonuses

18%

21%

23%

25%

13%

Cut back on perquisites

12%

17%

23%

32%

16%

Reduce number receiving long-term incentives

5%

13%

26%

41%

15%

Significant reduction in headcount (10% or more)

8%

8%

22%

44%

18%

Hefferlin: If Oil Keeps Plunging, Employment Should Pick Up

by
Todd Raphael
Aug 3, 2008, 2:47 am ET

Jonathan R. Hefferlin, managing director at MRI Dana Point, a former radio commentator and a prescient observer of economic trends, gives his weekend take on Friday’s jobs report. keep reading…

Integrating Labor Market Data into Planning and Recruiting Strategies

by
Leslie Stevens
Jun 17, 2008, 4:00 am ET

Workforce planning uses a blend of hard data, human intelligence, and management intuition to accurately forecast upcoming recruiting needs. While the process is vital, a challenge to forecasting efficacy is general economic trends that don’t always jive with the labor market trends.

This can make projecting employee retirement or turnover rates and swings in the labor pool difficult. Tracking labor market trends to proactively predict changes and comparing your company’s historical experience to those changes can increase forecasting accuracy and recruitment strategy effectiveness.

A new Employment Trends Index (ETI) developed by The Conference Board synthesizes data from eight sources to predict swings in the labor market. Since the labor market usually contracts before the general economy and recovers earlier, the index is helpful in spotting changes and explaining variances to senior leadership.

“I think this type of data always helps talent acquisition leaders become more strategic and less tactical in their planning,” says Kevin Wheeler, president of Global Learning Resources.

“The individual index components may also point out potential sources of employees. For example, increases in the number of working temporary employees might point to hiring opportunities within the temp workforce.”

keep reading…