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jobdescriptions RSS feed Tag: jobdescriptions

Not-too-expensive Employer Branding

by Jun 18, 2014, 12:26 am ET

co-authored with Michael Pelts, RightJoin

What do folks think about your company? Every organization has a public image as an employer (and if you don’t, all the worse), and the image determines whether in-demand professionals will agree to be in touch.

The hands-down champion in employer marketing to software engineers is Google, which regularly gets photo-shoots of its toy-filled offices in top media like the New York Times. These campaigns are planned to draw in the best candidates in the industry and also to increase retention among current employees. In the final calculation, they more than pay for themselves with a significant reduction in recruiting costs.

In many small and medium sized companies, the priorities cannot justify the budget for long-term branding campaigns to boost the corporate image. But employers have started to realize that strong employer branding can make the difference between excellent hires and unfilled reqs; or, even worse, filling the position with unqualified candidates. Luckily, employer branding can be done on the cheap by combining it with recruiting: They both have the same target audience, and they boost each other when done together.

In this article, we’ll explain how to do this efficiently, focusing on the area we know most about: software engineering. keep reading…

What? No Job Postings?!?

by May 22, 2014, 2:38 am ET

Inside Zappos profile pic - updatedIf you ask my team, they will tell you that I love change and innovation. In the last couple of years I’ve helped push our team to new heights in sourcing, pioneering, and exploring new HR technology, building in efficiencies and finding unique ways to connect with potential candidates. When I look back at all of those “innovative” initiatives, I now realize that I was just iterating on a fundamentally broken process. keep reading…

Limited Language Recruiting and the Art of Haiku

by May 16, 2014, 9:41 am ET

tpfccdlfdtte pcaccplircdt dklpcfrp?qeiq lhpqlipqeodf gpwafopwprti izxndkiqpkii krirrifcapnc dxkdciqcafmd vkfpcadf.

Need a hint? It’s a Twitter recruiting message.

Another? It’s a simple (they tell me) substitution cipher.

Give up? Don’t care? Clearly you are not NSA material. (That would be the National Security Agency.) The agency may have its problems keeping its secrets secret, but the clever recruiters there sure know how to use Twitter. keep reading…

Video Job Descriptions — a Not-to-be Missed Application Accelerator

by May 12, 2014, 12:32 am ET

quickstopIf you don’t know what a video job description is, it is a short video clip where the hiring manager and team members describe the exciting aspects of a particular job in order to convince top-quality but reluctant prospects to apply. A video job description is a supplement to, rather than a replacement for, the standard and often tedious 100 percent text narrative job description. You should consider adopting video job descriptions because they are about to become “the next big thing” in convincing prospects to apply.

Video job descriptions or VJDs are a 3-for-1 opportunity for measurably improving your recruiting results. keep reading…

Unless You Segment Your Recruiting Messaging, You Won’t Attract Top Performers and Techies

by Jan 20, 2014, 5:45 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-01-16 at 10.35.36 AMUnless you tailor your bait, you’ll never attract the very best prospects

It might sound silly on the surface, but fishing and recruiting have a lot in common. Any seasoned fisherman or woman would tell you without hesitation that the same bait that effectively attracts small fish simply would have no impact on attracting the harder-to-land big fish.

In recruiting, the need to match your “bait” or attraction features to your target is no different. The job and company features that would attract the average Joe to a job (I call them “paycheck jobs”) would barely get the attention of top performers, techies, and innovators. For example, the average Joe might be excited about the fact that you have good benefits while an innovator may be more interested in how often you take risks and fund innovative ideas.

There lies the problem in corporate recruiting. Almost all the information provided by corporate recruiting is designed to be general to meet a larger audience. But unless there is a separate message on your site or external to it that has “bait” that is tailored to attract this more desirable and harder to land target, they will never view your firm as desirable. keep reading…

To Hire Well, First Define What You Need

by Jan 14, 2014, 5:52 am ET

A friend of my neighbor manages a call center. He has had, as he puts it, the worst luck in finding people who both do a good job and stay. I asked how he sources his talent, and he showed me his boilerplate posting:

Wanted – experienced call center employees.

There was some other generic ad text, but that was about it. You can believe that no two people have the same definition of what this means. His lack of clarity about the behaviors, skills, and experience he needs in his roles encourages his swinging employment door.

As a workplace consultant and executive coach, I see the reason recruiting is so difficult is that most organizations don’t have and religiously use a process to clearly, fully, and accurately define the role’s qualifications; this includes behaviors in addition to skills and experience. keep reading…

Time to Step Up to the Marketing Plate

by Jan 2, 2014, 5:45 am ET

Screen Shot 2013-12-19 at 3.44.24 PMI recently led a session at a recruiting conference in which I asked how many of the talent acquisition professionals present had to give an account of or provide a forecast for their budget– which was on average between $75,000 and $100,000 per year. Almost no one raised their hand!

Surely there are some organizations that are more ROI-focused and demand more from their recruiters, but this is clearly not the norm. The norm is comprised of vague projections, with little to no accounting for the return on those budget dolloars.

Can you imagine any other department in a business having zero accountability for how it spends its money? How would it go over if, for instance, the sales department said, “We don’t think it’s necessary to explain what we spent our budget on. We spent it, and we need more next year. Thanks.”? It would go over about as well as a lead balloon. The typical budgetary process does not support dart-throwing.

So, why is this allowed in the recruiting function? There are several culprits behind these low expectations. keep reading…

Employer Branding: Don’t Get Taken in By the Waffle

by Dec 26, 2013, 6:35 am ET

bpEvery few years our business lexicon gets invaded by a new cliche. Management speak like “big data” and “social hiring” … vague terms that no one can really define but are liberally trotted out typically by vendors, consultants, and conference speakers trying to impress you. The king of the management cliches at present and one that makes my skin crawl is employer branding. There. I said it — well wrote it — but I was cringing when I did.

If you ever hear someone wittering on about employer branding I dare you to interrupt them and say, “define employer branding.”

I bet most won’t give you a very good definition and will be suitably aghast that you even questioned one of recruitment’s current sacred cows, but challenge it you must. Prick the pomposity bubble that we get sucked into. I read one article recently that urged all companies to create a “compelling employer value proposition.” There were few details on what that meant or how to implement it. In short it was just waffle. Companies spend fortunes and waste thousands of hours (I know, I was part of one) designing internal value propositions to allow company recruiters to become “front-line brand ambassadors.” This is nonsense. Stop wasting your time and money.

Let’s examine what exactly people are referring to when they talk about employer branding. Let’s cut through the waffle and look at some specifics that you can actually do to boost your organization’s perception among job seekers. keep reading…

Overused LinkedIn Buzzwords … Are Job Descriptions and Recruiters to Blame?

by Dec 13, 2013, 9:45 am ET

LinkedIn came out with “Top 10 Overused LinkedIn Profile Buzzwords of 2013.”

As usual there has been a lot of attention given to this yearly list including articles giving advice on how not to use these words. I am sure speakers and trainers have already updated their slide decks.

So I wrote a blog post and sent it to Todd here at ERE with a bit of a rant about how I think job descriptions are to blame.

And how I wish LinkedIn would do the same thing with job descriptions.

Guess what? LinkedIn did, sort of.

Todd pointed me to The 10 Buzzwords Recruiters Overused in 2013 (scroll down here). It’s a look at Recruiter profiles and buzzwords.

And guess what …  you ready for this? keep reading…

How to Write a Rocking Job Description for Recruitment

by Nov 29, 2013, 6:29 am ET

The best and most effective job descriptions give people a sense of what it’s like to be a part of the company. Don’t assume that everyone knows about your company. A small blurb describing the company is good practice and helps potential candidates build a mental image of what it might be like e to work there. Personality and culture should either be directly described or be reflected in the structure and wording of the description.

Airbnb does this in a really nice simplistic way: keep reading…

Your Job Listings Are Trying to Tell You Something

by Nov 7, 2013, 1:50 am ET

Screen Shot 2013-10-30 at 10.16.22 AMPut yourself in your prospective employee’s shoes. What would make you apply for the job you’re listing? Are you looking for a title, more money, or career advancement? Most people want these things, and most companies claim they can offer all of them and more. So, why is it so difficult to find highly qualified candidates for your open position among the hundreds of resumes you receive from online job postings?

The answer may lie in the content and quality of your online job listing, which has to not only reflect what you want from a candidate, but what a superstar candidate would want from you. keep reading…

A Short Checklist for Job Descriptions

by Nov 4, 2013, 5:45 am ET

Search engines scan job descriptions to identify keywords associated with a particular search. Including relevant keywords or phrases ensures that your job description will appear on the appropriate searches, and enable candidates to narrow jobs by specific criteria in the filters on the left-hand side of the search results page.

A good job description encourages candidates to self-select by making the role attractive enough that qualified candidates apply and the unqualified ones don’t. Include the following components: keep reading…

5 Rules for Effective Job Titles

by Oct 29, 2013, 6:45 am ET

As the first thing candidates see, in bold colored lettering, the job title greatest impact on whether candidates will click on a listing. Here’s how to write good ones. keep reading…

Watch Your Words: Job Seekers Aren’t Searching for the Ones You’re Using

by Oct 25, 2013, 6:44 am ET

Every day, millions of job seekers enter millions of search terms into job search engines. On an average session, a job seeker might view hundreds of job listings and click through to dozens of job descriptions.

The search terms and location are the most obvious indicators of which jobs will be shown to a job seeker when they use a search engine. Given this obvious connection between a job seeker’s search and the job listing delivered, you might find it surprising how often employer job descriptions do not contain the words that job seekers are using in their search.

Lessons From the Cloud keep reading…

New Hershey’s Video Talks Candidly About a Recruiting Job

by Jul 25, 2013, 2:38 pm ET

My friend Bryan Chaney let me know about a new and very interesting video from Hershey’s, where you hear candidly about a talent acquisition job, and a little about the selection process. keep reading…

You Report to No One; You Are the CEO (Duh)

by Jun 14, 2013, 1:13 pm ET

Screen Shot 2013-06-14 at 10.05.00 AMThat not-so-subtly large graphic at right is just as large when you land on the lululemon careers site.

Yes, the company is hiring an CEO, but unlike many other job ads, this one you’ll actually remember. keep reading…

Network With a Spy: The NSA Knows the ‘Hidden Job Market’

by Jun 14, 2013, 3:14 am ET

CIA recruitment adWith all due respect to Lou Adler, the world now knows how to discover his “hidden job market.”

Call the NSA. Skip the networking with the hoi polloi and just cozy up to a spy who works IT for the agency.

As we all now know, the National Security Agency is tapped into every phone call and every email we all send and receive. (Which explains why those Nigerian businessmen and royalty have so much trouble getting their millions out of the country. But that’s another story.)

So who better to know who’s hiring, what the jobs are, and how to get directly to the hiring manager than one of the agency’s network admins? keep reading…

What Great Job Postings Have in Common

by May 29, 2013, 6:41 am ET

job descriptions.jpgToo often company job descriptions are filled with hyperbole and trite sound bites like “work-hard, play-harder” and focus more on details such as lunch and snacks than the job itself. A job description is your critical first impression when recruiting, and if you lose them before they even apply you’re operating at a steep disadvantage. Too often, generic, lackluster descriptions fail to communicate some pretty cool opportunities.

In order to get the talent you want and need at your company, sharpen your job descriptions to attract the most qualified candidates. I’ll tell you how do to that, but first I’ll start with what not to do. keep reading…

Why You Can’t Hire High Achievers

by Apr 25, 2013, 6:45 am ET

hiring poll.jpgIf a manager is concerned about hiring a high achiever, you need to be concerned about the manager!

We just ran a quick poll (see question and results in graphic) to determine if hiring managers would trade off experience for potential if they didn’t have to compromise performance or results. Two-thirds agreed. How would you answer the question, and how would your hiring managers? If you’re not on the same page, you’re working a lot harder than necessary. keep reading…

Know What You’re Recruiting For

by Apr 18, 2013, 6:17 am ET

Screen Shot 2013-04-03 at 11.15.16 AMA problem common to most recruiters and human resources professionals today is a lack of understanding the actual job they are trying to fill. It’s really a fine line a recruiter toes, because understanding the role itself is not only imperative for sourcing talent but is also a huge advantage for closing that top passive candidate. The overall understanding of the role itself starts with the job title. If the job title is not a good fit for what you seek, you are likely in big trouble. keep reading…