Receive daily articles & headlines each day in your inbox with your free ERE Daily Subscription.

Not logged in. [log in or register]

interviewing RSS feed Tag: interviewing

If You Think Wearing Google Glass to an Interview is Weird, See Al

by Jul 25, 2014, 12:26 am ET

Google GlassBeing so awesomely culturally plugged in, I can not believe me and my little Roundup column missed the Google Glass recruiting interview video from TMP Labs.

Cool as it is, and not so much a concept thing as entirely possible pretty much now, the TMP video gets beat hands down (and by 2.698 million views to 13,158) by a Google Glass interview video from Gonzaguetv. keep reading…

Disappearing Applications, 6-Minute Toilet Times, and HR’s Abundant ‘Faulty Practices’

by Jul 18, 2014, 6:13 am ET

toiletThis July is the kind of month Roundup lives for. It’s the silly season times three.

So far this month we’ve heard about:

How Recruiters Can Create Successful Partnerships With Hiring Managers

by Jul 11, 2014, 12:01 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-07-10 at 1.24.13 PMRecruiters and hiring managers’ shared goal is to fill positions with top talent. So why do they often end up frustrated with each other? Most often, it’s because hiring managers and recruiters have different perspectives and approaches when it comes to hiring.

The only person you can change is you. Take on the responsibility to be a guide, to provide value by serving to help the hiring manager succeed, and in doing so, create a spirit of partnership. Here is some guidance to help you forge a successful working relationship with hiring managers. keep reading…

The Worst Interview Question Ever

by Jun 12, 2014, 12:01 am ET

“What is your greatest weakness?” is the worst interview question, ever.

Here’s why you should be asking candidates about their greatest strength.  keep reading…

A Guide to Ruby on Rails Interviewing

by May 20, 2014, 2:46 pm ET

Screen Shot 2014-05-20 at 11.41.05 AMA career site for developers has a new interviewing guide out for evaluating a candidate’s Rails knowledge.

It’s not meant as a list of questions a candidate must know the answer to, but as more of a sample interview question page.

Here’s the link.

Limited Language Recruiting and the Art of Haiku

by May 16, 2014, 9:41 am ET

tpfccdlfdtte pcaccplircdt dklpcfrp?qeiq lhpqlipqeodf gpwafopwprti izxndkiqpkii krirrifcapnc dxkdciqcafmd vkfpcadf.

Need a hint? It’s a Twitter recruiting message.

Another? It’s a simple (they tell me) substitution cipher.

Give up? Don’t care? Clearly you are not NSA material. (That would be the National Security Agency.) The agency may have its problems keeping its secrets secret, but the clever recruiters there sure know how to use Twitter. keep reading…

6 Interview Questions to Ask Candidates in a Video Interview

by May 8, 2014, 12:05 am ET

In a one-way video interview, candidates answer employer’s questions with short video answers. These answers can be viewed at any time and for any duration. If you know immediately someone is all wrong for the job, you can move on to a better fitting candidate.

The key to making one-way video interviews work for you is to come up with a list of questions to give insight into the candidate’s cultural fit. For instance, here are some questions you might want to ask in the one-way video interview: keep reading…

4 Ways to Make Interviewing a 2-Way Street

by May 7, 2014, 12:06 am ET

So much information is thrown at job seekers on how to interview: here is how to dress; here is what to say; this is the answer to the million-dollar salary question; be sure to send a thank-you letter, etc.  Then there are the horrid interview stories that everyone consistently shares with one another and laughs at: the girl who brought her cat into an interview, the recent college graduate who mid-way through the interview takes a call on his cell phone, the gentleman who shows up dressed in shorts — just to name a few recruiting water cooler stories.

Yet, hardly if ever does anyone, especially recruiters, HR professionals or hiring managers stop to look at themselves and analyze their own behavior. keep reading…

Steps for Increasing Your Speed of Hire in Order to Improve Your Quality of Hire, Part 2 of 2

by May 5, 2014, 2:06 am ET

This continuation of the two-part article covers specific actions that corporate recruiters can implement to speed up their hiring during each individual step of the recruiting process. Part 1 covered the cost of slow hiring and some advanced steps on how to improve the speed of the overall hiring process.

Speed Improvements for Each Major Step of Recruiting keep reading…

Here’s How You Need to Upgrade Your Behavioral Interviews

by May 1, 2014, 12:54 am ET

You would be hard pressed to find a candidate today who isn’t familiar with and prepared for a behavioral interview. A behavioral interview is based on the premise that past performance predicts future behavior. It’s designed to elicit information about how candidates handled a past challenge and the behaviors and decision-making process that went into it. A classic example of a behavioral question is: “Tell me about a time when you had to deal with a difficult customer.” If you’ve been hired in the last 20 years, you’ve probably been asked that.

A Google search for “behavioral interviewing” yields 6.4 million results. Candidates research and rehearse for the most common questions and may even be able to drill down to the specific questions your hiring managers ask via “reviews” from recent candidates on social sites.

Time for Behavioral Interviewing 2.0 keep reading…

Peer Interviewing: The Right Tool in the Wrong Hands?

by Apr 30, 2014, 12:32 am ET

Norm Abrams of PBS’s long-running series This Old House spent a lot of time educating viewers on the value of using the appropriate tools. He used to say that the wrong tool in the right hands would always produce disappointing results. As builders of teams — not houses — HR leaders might consider this statement in reverse. After all, when it comes to staffing, the right tool in the wrong hands can be detrimental, too.

Case in point: The peer interview. keep reading…

Is Your Hiring Process Too Friendly?

by Apr 22, 2014, 3:38 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-04-11 at 12.32.55 AMWe all agree that nothing ruins a workplace culture like a jerk co-worker or a rude manager. But how do you uncover those characteristics in your pre-employment interviews? Even Vladimir Putin can seem charming if you only ask questions like What are your career goals? What motivates you? and What are you looking for in a job? before making an offer.

Your hiring process needs to occasionally challenge the candidate to see how they react to pressure. The best way to do this is to share criticisms with the candidate so you can experience firsthand — through your own eyes and your own ears — how they respond.

Before I expand upon that concept, I want to make sure my advice is balanced. Yes, the candidate should be challenged, but you must also achieve these five emotional outcomes during your interview process: keep reading…

Informational Interviews for People Who Don’t Need Them

by Feb 26, 2014, 12:55 am ET

Sourcing has always been the hardest part of recruiting experienced, employed professionals (my experience has been with software developers). It’s much easier for me after I get into a serious conversation with candidates. I can establish rapport and find out what it takes to make them happy. But getting them to talk to me in the first place? Now that’s tough.  keep reading…

10 Fastballs and 1 Curveball to Ask Top Candidates

by Feb 13, 2014, 12:02 am ET

Usually I see someone’s resume a few minutes before the interview starts. In the time (and adrenaline) rush of an interview, it’s easy to make small talk and rehash a resume — but much harder to make a thorough assessment of fit.

One way we’ve found to avoid costly hiring mistakes is to spread thoughtful and provocative questions across the interview team. You owe it your company to analyze how the candidate thinks on her feet. Here are 10 questions we may ask to identify rockstars: keep reading…

Video Interview Best Practices for Employers

by Feb 12, 2014, 12:54 am ET

If you Google “video interview best practices” you will see a lot of ”how to look your best on-camera” articles for job seekers. This article is instead aimed at HR professionals who are wondering how their colleagues are using it, and what some best practices might be. I will detail how the technology is being used (and misused), and how to get the most out of it using a Q + A format. keep reading…

How to Build Powerful Behavioral-Based Questions

by Feb 11, 2014, 12:05 am ET

We are getting better at realizing that our recruiting process must assess for behaviors and abilities in addition to skills and experience. After all, in an intellectual workplace, we must be able to assess candidate thinking, considering we are paying our employees to think their way through the day.

The best way to assess candidate behaviors/talent is to craft and deliver effective behavioral-based questions. These questions, unlike conventional interview questions, follow a formula I share with my clients. This formula makes the questions easy to build, deliver, and effective at gathering meaningful information. keep reading…

Judging the Voice: The Reality of Phone Interview Bias

by Jan 24, 2014, 6:44 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-01-20 at 8.42.21 PMWhat do you have in common with Cee Lo Green, Christina Aguilera, Blake Sheldon, and Adam Levine? If you spend time searching for top talent, quite a lot! After all, with the rise of HR phone screening and first-round phone interviews, recruiting is beginning to resemble the blind auditions on the blockbuster TV show, The Voice.

On The Voice, blind auditions ensure that talent is judged fairly, with no bias based on their appearance. On the recruiting front, the voice of a job candidate could unwittingly cause bias or at least weigh heavily on the decision-making process of an interviewer.

Now, some would say that candidates actually benefit from phone screenings because initial decisions are not influenced by a candidate’s appearance or body language. However, research suggests that many candidates’ voices could sway first impressions and damage their chances for a second interview. After all, it’s human nature to make silent judgments about people based on how they speak.   keep reading…

How Much Pizza Must You Eat Before You Use the ‘Quit Your Job’ App?

by Jan 24, 2014, 1:54 am ET

Glassdoor logoGlassdoor has its annual list out of the oddest of the oddball interview questions candidates get. Compared to previous years, this year’s list is tamer, less weird. Some of the questions even make a kind of good sense.

For example, Mckinsey & Company, the big, global consulting company, made the list with this: “If you were 80 years old, what would you tell your children?” Reasonable enough for a candidate who might be working on advice for a Fortune 500 company at some point.

Now last year, Clark Construction made the list, asking, ““A penguin walks through that door right now wearing a sombrero. What does he say and why is he here?” Google was also there with one of its famous (infamous?) brain teasers: “How many cows in Canada?” keep reading…

Coming Up: Take Your Parents to Work and Get Them to Do It For You Day

by Jan 17, 2014, 12:03 am ET

First we had Bring Your Daughter to Work Day. Then the boys wanted equal time so now we have the tongue-stumbling Take Our Daughters and Sons to Work Day.  As the childless Millennials crept into the workforce, they began bringing their dogs to work, which led to Take Your Dog to Work Day.

In the last couple of years, as childless and dog-less Millennials infiltrated America’s workplaces and tried to explain to mom and dad (with whom they were still living) just what they did as a UI architect, someone decided how cool it would be to have a Take Your Parents to Work Day.

But now (and I took the long way ’round the mountain to get here), now we’re hearing reports of the kids bringing mom or dad, or sometimes mom and dad to the job interview. keep reading…

Who Are the Despicable Mes in Recruiting?

by Dec 23, 2013, 5:56 am ET

Bits of carbon on a white background (carbon totem)The combination of the popular “Despicable Me” movies and the Christmas season made me think about who in the recruiting process should get “a lump of coal” in their stockings for their naughty behavior. Obviously any list like this that identifies problem-causers involves some generalizations, because there are always some individual exceptions. However, in any field there are individuals who hold certain job titles that all-too-often remind me of the lead character Gru in the Despicable Me movies.

Those who qualify for the Despicable Me label on my list include recruiters, other individuals who impact recruiting, and even a few recruiting tools. I’d like to open what I hope is a continuing discussion with my personal “Despicable Me top 10+ list”. The list is broken into two categories: recruiters and those who contribute to the recruiting effort.

You May Be a Despicable Me Recruiter If You Are … keep reading…