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hiring RSS feed Tag: hiring

The Top 12 Reasons Why Slow Hiring Severely Damages Recruiting and Business Results

by Apr 21, 2014, 12:14 am ET

A candidate from a well-known benchmark firm dropped out of our search for a General Manager position because the hiring manager took a week to respond to his interest. He said…

It’s not like I need their job. If it takes them a week to respond to a resume like mine for a job of this importance, they’re not the kind of company I want to work for. I move fast, and I can already see that my style wouldn’t fit their culture. –Wind River Associates

As a corporate recruiting leader, know that in a highly competitive college marketplace, there may be nothing that damages corporate recruiting results more than slow hiring.

Many firms now go the first step and track some variation of the “time-to-fill” metric. But despite that metric, not only are firms still almost universally guilty of painfully slow hiring, but to compound the problem, few recruiting leaders truly understand the many negative business and recruiting impacts that result from slow hiring. I estimate that the impact at most corporations exceeds tens of millions of dollars each year. And the dollar loss from this factor may be as much as 10 times higher than losses resulting from low recruiting efficiency related to the more popular “cost-per-hire” metric.

It’s not enough to be conscious and aware of slow hiring. Identify and then quantify in dollars each of the negative impacts of slow hiring, so that everyone from the CEO on down will support the streamlining of the process. After several decades of work on “speed hiring,” I have put together an extensive list of the negative consequences associated with taking too long to hire. The top 12 most damaging factors are listed below.

The Top 12 Reasons Why “Slow Hiring” Damages Recruiting and Your Business Results keep reading…

Class Hiring Tips for Recruiters

by Mar 28, 2014, 12:36 am ET

Companies with call centers or large customer service centers need to hire high volumes of employees on a continual, routine basis. This type of hiring presents unique challenges and requires dedicated, results-focused recruiters to keep a steady pipeline of candidates flowing through the system. If you are responsible for class hiring, here is a primer and some tips on how to succeed. keep reading…

All Companies Should Hire Like Google

by Mar 18, 2014, 6:25 am ET
Google - Santa Monica

Google – Santa Monica

I don’t work at Google. I never have. I know multiple managers and former directors in HR & recruiting who’ve been there and shared their experiences. I, like many, have read countless articles on why Google is so great place to work. In terms of products, I’m a fan but not devoted to any cult of Google. Some of its past hiring practices were arrogant, inefficient, and any experienced talent acquisition leader could tell you were a waste of time.

There are articles in the LA Times and elsewhere whose main premises are that Google is ignoring how smart applicants really are by not using intelligence testing any longer. “GPAs are worthless as a criteria for hiring, and test scores are worthless … We found that they don’t predict anything,” noted Lazlo Bock, head of talent at Google. They feel it’d be mistake to follow Google’s lead. I disagree.

I think they’re missing the big point. Companies should hire like Google but adapt to their needs. keep reading…

If Barry White Were a Recruiter

by Mar 13, 2014, 5:45 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-03-02 at 2.43.43 PMNobody wants a selfish lover or a selfish recruiter, so take a lesson from Barry White and warm up your talent prospect before popping the question.

The business of recruiting is a unique one, but in many ways there are parallels to the dating game. Finding an appealing talent prospect is like spotting someone across a crowded bar: you have to be aware that any candidate you’re talking to is also being looked at/assessed by a at least a half-dozen other thirsty companies.

With what is probably a bombardment of attention, the prospect most certainly has his/her shields up — and rightly so. To establish that relationship you have to get around those shields and bring something to the table that makes you stand out from the crowd.

And that begs the question: what if Barry White were a recruiter? How would he approach talent?

Immediate Gratification vs. Performance keep reading…

February Jobs Report: Better Than Expected; Not as Good as Last Year

by Mar 7, 2014, 9:40 am ET

February 2014 econ indicatorsLess crippled than economists predicted by the nasty weather that gripped much of the nation last month, the U.S.Department of Labor reported this morning the economy improved hiring in February, adding 175,000 new jobs. That was 25,000 more jobs than the average of analyst estimates.

In this touch-and-go recovery, gains higher than expected are good news. But the numbers over the last three months are anemic compared to last year’s average 190,000 new monthly jobs. February 2013, unencumbered by bitter weather, saw 280,000 new jobs. keep reading…

Who’s to Blame for the Perfect Fit Syndrome ?

by Mar 6, 2014, 5:09 am ET

An employer trying to hire the perfect candidate is in many ways a good thing. It’s a significant improvement from the days of hiring anyone who could fog a mirror. But has the pendulum gone too far?

The answer is a resounding yes. A perfect candidate does not exist. He never has, he never will. The best any manager could hope for is the candidate who has many of the essential skills and experiences, lots of potential, a willingness to learn and develop continuously, and is engaged with and by the culture. That’s a tall order — a very tall order and one that many managers take to extremes.

The result of falling victim to The Perfect Fit Syndrome is that sometimes these positions are never filled. I’ll admit that might be the extreme case but it’s also not so uncommon.  Many managers place the sole blame on the poor quality of job applicants.

But that’s a cop-out and one excuse that senior management has bought hook, line, and sinker.  keep reading…

Informational Interviews for People Who Don’t Need Them

by Feb 26, 2014, 12:55 am ET

Sourcing has always been the hardest part of recruiting experienced, employed professionals (my experience has been with software developers). It’s much easier for me after I get into a serious conversation with candidates. I can establish rapport and find out what it takes to make them happy. But getting them to talk to me in the first place? Now that’s tough.  keep reading…

Facebook’s Billion-dollar Hiring Lesson — the Business Case for Eliminating Missed Hires

by Feb 21, 2014, 5:56 am ET

whatsappThe most costly recruiting error in recent history was revealed last week.

On Wednesday, Facebook announced its nearly $19 billion purchase of the instant-messaging firm WhatsApp. But the real news about the acquisition relates to the colossal recruiting failure that occurred a handful of years earlier (as reported by Forbes) when both WhatsApp founders Jan Koum and Brian Acton applied for a job at Facebook and were rejected (Acton was also rejected by Twitter).

As Brian Acton put it ,“We’re part of the Facebook reject club.” You could easily argue that this colossal “hiring miss” cost Facebook billions, and as a result, this hiring error has to rank near the top “not hired” errors, only rivaled by HP’s rejection of Steve Jobs for not having a college degree. If you are a corporate talent manager, this and similar errors should now become a critical part of your business case for fully funding an effective recruiting team and flawless hiring process.

The Top Eight “Billion-dollar Hiring Miss Lessons” for Talent Leaders keep reading…

Why Good Candidates Fail: Beware the 90 Percent Job Fit

by Feb 11, 2014, 1:20 am ET

I receive frequent requests for pre-employment tests that provide a job fit score. These scores provide a pseudo “Dummies Guide to Hiring” — a lazy manager’s approach to screening job applicants.

Make no mistake about it: assessment systems that include a score make it easy to screen out high-risk candidates.  They are a time-saver and reduce the assessment learning curve for recruiters and hiring managers.

But the inclusion of a job fit score or “hire/don’t hire” rating is susceptible to abuse and misuse. It’s not the inclusion of the score that is inherently bad. The problem arises when Mike the Manager hires or rejects a candidate based exclusively on the score alone. keep reading…

I Filled a Job You Didn’t Know You Had

by Feb 4, 2014, 6:27 am ET

OK, so you’re a hiring manager, and you’ve just arrived at the office, grabbed your coffee, and opened up your email inbox. There — in boldfaced lettering — the subject line of my email screams

JOB PROPOSAL MEMO.

And you’re thinking … great. Another spam from some job seeker. But you open it anyway.

And that’s how my story at Beyond.com began. keep reading…

Hiring Employees Who Are ‘Customer-Ready’

by Feb 3, 2014, 12:55 am ET

The Age of the Customer is the title and the focus of Jim Blasingame’s new book. I like the tagline even more — Prepare For The Moment of Relevance.

This got me thinking about manpower — human capital — whether are our employees capable of preparing for that moment of delivering service in an epic way? Moreover, how does the organization consider this in the hiring and recruiting process — hiring employees who are “customer-ready” and prepared to deliver exceptional service in that moment of relevance.” keep reading…

Recruiting Great Talent Is the Core of the Netflix HR Revolution

by Jan 15, 2014, 5:59 am ET

NetflixHow did Netflix reinvent HR? In one word, “Recruiting.”

“Hire, reward, and tolerate only fully formed adults,” writes Patty McCord in the Harvard Business Review. “The best thing you can do for employees — a perk better than foosball or free sushi — is hire only “A” players to work alongside them. Excellent colleagues trump everything else.”

If you hire the right people, so much of what companies do in the name of human resources becomes, if not superfluous, at least of much less importance. keep reading…

To Hire Well, First Define What You Need

by Jan 14, 2014, 5:52 am ET

A friend of my neighbor manages a call center. He has had, as he puts it, the worst luck in finding people who both do a good job and stay. I asked how he sources his talent, and he showed me his boilerplate posting:

Wanted – experienced call center employees.

There was some other generic ad text, but that was about it. You can believe that no two people have the same definition of what this means. His lack of clarity about the behaviors, skills, and experience he needs in his roles encourages his swinging employment door.

As a workplace consultant and executive coach, I see the reason recruiting is so difficult is that most organizations don’t have and religiously use a process to clearly, fully, and accurately define the role’s qualifications; this includes behaviors in addition to skills and experience. keep reading…

There Are People in Your Shiny Objects

by Jan 14, 2014, 12:47 am ET

We’re heading into another new year, a year full of promise and opportunity and predictions from the experts about which techniques and technologies will remain or become vital weapons in the recruitment arsenal.

  • Blogs
  • Mobile Accessibility
  • QR Codes
  • SMS Texts
  • Applicant Tracking System Upgrades
  • Search Engine Optimization and Search Engine Marketing
  • Local Market SEO
  • Talent Community/CRM/Relationship Marketing
  • Source Identification/Tracking
  • Social Media
  • Employment Branding
  • Employee Referral
  • Talent Segmentation/Targeted Marketing
  • Employment/Internal Communications
  • Alumni Outreach
  • Job Description Upgrades
  • Branding people with RIFD codes and tracking their every movement and behavior … keep reading…

Worst Job Growth in Two Years Stuns Analysts

by Jan 10, 2014, 9:39 am ET

December 2013 econ indicatorsThe government’s estimates of December’s job growth, projected by most economists to come in at somewhat over 190,000, stunned analysts with the report of an anemic 74,000 new jobs.

The report, released this morning by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, contradicts other, positive signs of economic strength, including strong home sales and a rise in the manufacturing index over the last several months. The National Employment Report from ADP and Moody’s Analytics, out Wednesday, estimated the private sector in December added 238,000 non-farm jobs.

The job growth number was the worst since May 2011. keep reading…

CareerBuilder Jobs Forecast: Cautious Hiring Ahead

by Dec 31, 2013, 3:31 am ET

CB job forecast 2014 hiring changeInfluenced by the budget uncertainty in Washington, HR professionals and hiring managers in CareerBuilder’s annual survey of hiring intentions said they expected to increase headcount in 2014, but the numbers and the rate of hire would depend on Congressional action about the debt ceiling.

The budget bill President Obama signed last week resolved only part of the national fiscal uncertainty. The debt ceiling, which is due to come in February, is a different matter. Both parties has so far signaled their intention not to compromise on raising the federal borrowing limit. keep reading…

U.S. Economy Shows Job Growth Strength; Adds 215k Jobs

by Dec 4, 2013, 1:14 pm ET

ADP Nov 2013 reportHandily beating predictions for a modest jobs increase last month, ADP reported this morning that the U.S. private sector added 215,000 jobs in November.

That estimate, derived from the millions of paychecks ADP processes each month, was 40,000 to 50,000 jobs higher than surveys of economists predicted. ADP, and its partner Moody’s Analytics also upped the initial job counts for September and October by 93,000 more jobs.

Small businesses, those with fewer than 50 workers, added 102,000 new jobs. The largest employers, those with more than 1,000 employees, added 70,000 jobs. keep reading…

Foosball, Purple Squirrels, and Speed Dating: A summary of our roundtable discussions at Menlo Ventures on hiring in the startup world

by Nov 14, 2013, 6:27 am ET

Screen Shot 2013-11-04 at 10.13.44 AMI recently participated in a great roundtable discussion (video at the bottom of this post) on recruiting for startups, sponsored by Menlo Ventures and moderated by Jim McCarthy. On the panel with me was Manuel Medina of GroupTalent, Jon Bischke of Entelo, and Todd Raphael of ERE.

Each of our companies is bringing something unique to help disrupt the recruiting space: Readyforce for its attention to linking college students with startups and technology companies, Entelo as a metric-based recruiting tool, and GroupTalent as a high-end job board for software developers. And of course, ERE as a medium to bridge recruiters with the trends and companies like ours.

As startups, we recognize that managing our precious resources of limited cash and employees’ time to find the elusive purple squirrels requires a serious game plan. Here are three of the top takeaways from our discussion that can help firm up your recruiting: keep reading…

You Get What You Pay For: Why It’s So Hard to Hire Salespeople

by Nov 13, 2013, 6:05 am ET

Demand for sales professionals continues to boom, even in our fluctuating job market. An Indeed.com search for sales positions in the U.S. yields over 770,000 results (versus marketing at 280,000 and human resources at 96,000). With so much competition for great sales hires, it’s no surprise that sales positions continue to rank among the hardest to fill.

Often, a mismatch between compensation and candidate expectations, as well as complex recruitment processes, means losing out on a top candidate, especially at the lower levels. And because candidates have so many opportunities to choose from, compensation and the hiring process become critical factors in recruiting a top salesperson.

In the typical sales environment, commission is the most popular way to compensate sales representatives: it’s essentially a pay-for-performance model that rewards results. What makes commission-oriented opportunities work, however, isn’t the commission check, but rather the perks and incentives that surround sales compensation. While some companies may believe that great sellers can make a living on commission, the real question is: why should they sell for your organization? What does your company offer that a competitor can’t? The answers to these questions are the keys to crafting a successful recruitment program. keep reading…