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hiring RSS feed Tag: hiring

Speed Up Hiring Without Compromising Quality

by Nov 28, 2014, 5:26 am ET

Earlier this year, Dr. John Sullivan wrote a piece for ERE detailing the top 12 reasons why slow hiring damages recruiting – and hurts business results. Sullivan quotes a candidate who dropped out of the running for a coveted position because the hiring manager took too long to respond:

It’s not like I need their job. If it takes them a week to respond to a resume like mine for a job of this importance, they’re not the kind of company I want to work for. I move fast, and I can already see that my style wouldn’t fit in their culture. – Wind River Associates

It’s true that slow hiring puts you at a big disadvantage in the recruiting process. As Dr. Sullivan argues, moving too slowly can lead you to miss out on top candidates, lose revenue and productivity, and even damage your reputation as an employer and an organization. And with average time to fill at 25 days, its longest duration since 2001, there’s a good chance that many companies are feeling these effects.

However, there’s also risk involved when it comes to hiring too quickly. If you make an impulsive decision because you’re worried about losing a candidate to another company, you could end up hiring a candidate who’s a bad fit — and who ends up being a bad investment.

When it comes to hiring, talent acquisition professionals should follow the Goldilocks principle. The hiring process shouldn’t be too slow, and it shouldn’t be too fast.

The right pace depends on several things: the size of your organization, your company culture, the position you’re hiring for, and even the individual candidate. A company with 10 employees may want to spend more time getting to know a candidate than a company with 500 employees. Some candidates may seem like a perfect fit right away, while others may take several rounds of interviews.

To get the top talent — and ensure that they’re a good fit for your company, find the right pace for your hiring process.

Below are a few things to remember to help you do just that. keep reading…

Hire to Hurt: the Boldest Recruiting Strategy of Them All

by Nov 24, 2014, 5:56 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-11-20 at 8.01.16 AMThe recruiting function is unique among business functions because almost no one in recruiting can actually name even a handful of the different strategies that are available to the chief recruiting leader. But this article is not about the complete list of recruiting strategies (it can be found here), but instead it is about which strategy from among the 20+ possibilities is the boldest and most aggressive recruiting strategy.

The “Hire to Hurt” strategy (or H2H for short) is the most aggressive for a variety of reasons. The first is that the name alone sends chills through the risk adverse in recruiting. The name of the strategy is also clearly indicative of its chief goal, which is to “identify key talent and then directly hire them away to the point where your H2H hiring actually hurts the competitor’s business results.”

It’s a two-for-one deal. Not only does your firm get top quality talent but simultaneously your top competitors’ lose key talent. As one CEO put it, “I really like that strategy; our ship rises while their ship sinks” (Incidentally, the No. 2 most aggressive recruiting strategy is “make other firms your farm team”.)

Join the Team, Because Every Other Business Function Already Tries to Hurt the Competitors keep reading…

Improve Offer Acceptance Rates by Revealing the Quality of Your Team Members

by Nov 17, 2014, 5:35 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-11-12 at 10.57.11 PMTop candidates demand quality co-workers … so show them profiles of team members

Imagine this recruiting scenario. During a final interview, one of your top tech candidates clearly appears to be wavering about whether she is willing to leave her current “pretty good job” and accept a possible new opportunity at your firm. Suddenly the hiring manager makes a bold and unexpected move by leaning over and handing this reluctant candidate a stack of resumes, each one from a member of his current team. Why? In order to show her the power, education, experience, and capabilities of the team she’ll be joining.

In this case the manager was Jonathan Rosenberg (as outlined in his recent book), who eventually ran the product team at Google. However, this “show-them-their-future-coworkers” approach can be used by almost any hiring manager. In my experience, revealing the quality of the coworkers remains as one of the simplest, most effective but least-used candidate closing approaches.

The Average Worker Cares About Coworker Quality keep reading…

Hire Self-Motivated People — the Single Smartest Thing a Hiring Manager Can Do

by Nov 10, 2014, 5:55 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-11-06 at 3.12.11 PMHow recruiters can become a hero of your hiring managers by dramatically reducing the number of hours that they have to spend motivating and watching their employees 

If you are a corporate manager, you already know that you routinely spend a significant portion of your time trying to motivate your employees. On average, I estimate that encouraging, cajoling, and the worst part, having to hang around just to ensure that your employees are continuously working takes up to 50 percent of the average manager’s time each week. If you don’t believe my estimate, ask a few managers to keep a work log for a few weeks if you want an accurate time for your firm. You might go a step further and ask a few of your managers if they enjoy trying to motivate and if they are good at it, because you’re likely to find that they dread every minute of it.

Fortunately you can recapture every minute of that “motivation time” if you just do one simple thing: begin recruiting and hiring self-motivated employees. These type of employees are not a myth. They are called self-motivated or intrinsically motivated people. Imagine what it would be like as a manager to have a team full of employees who not only automatically did the work that they were assigned but who would also proactively seek out new work that needed to be done.  keep reading…

Increase Hiring Manager Performance and Compliance With Service-level Agreements

by Nov 3, 2014, 12:49 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-10-30 at 10.19.29 AMI estimate that hiring managers are responsible for more than 60 percent of all delays and errors during hiring. So if you want to improve your quality of hire, reduce position vacancy days, and improve process compliance, it only makes sense to try to get hiring managers to put a greater focus on recruiting. One proven solution is to adopt service-level agreements, which are one of the most effective tools that drive service delivery consistency in service-related functions outside of HR. keep reading…

Out in the Real World, a Lot of Jobs Just Aren’t That Amazing

by Oct 23, 2014, 12:39 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-10-22 at 11.30.07 AMIt’s difficult to attend an HR and recruiting centered conference and not find yourself sitting among a choir while one of our industry’s messiahs preaches to a crowd of smiling faces nodding in agreement to the sermon.

I’m not even saying it’s a bad thing. Sometimes it can be therapeutic. Lately it seems our spiritual advisors in talent have learned a new hymn, or perhaps they’ve simply remixed an old one and it just sounds cooler because there are more and more voices chiming in.

The tune is the one about finding and recruiting people who have found their passion. It’s in the key of C, since C is for “calling” and we want to hire only the best people who have found their calling. A lot of people are singing it. The melody is beautiful and I suggest giving it a listen if you’ve never heard it. You’ll be changed, if only briefly. keep reading…

Time to Kill the Requisition?

by Oct 7, 2014, 12:48 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-09-30 at 12.58.31 PMMost corporate recruiting teams still rely on requisition-based hiring. In most cases this means they focus on recruiting for openings as they arise using whatever recruiting channels yield the “right” talent readily available. Unfortunately their processes don’t typically yield the best talent as quickly as needed, leaving operational teams frustrated with the results.

The solution is to have a pipeline of talent at the ready when a new position arises. keep reading…

Recruit Top Prospects During Their ‘Angry Hours’ — Because Timing Is Everything

by Oct 6, 2014, 12:03 am ET

An in-depth analysis on how the right timing can dramatically improve recruiting

In my experience, the hardest-to-recruit exceptional targets are those who I label as “no, and stop calling me” passive top prospects who simply won’t accept a recruiter’s call. Even though most recruiters will tell you that their lack of interest in changing jobs is unwavering, my research has found that there are exceptions that may occur once or twice during each year, and I call them “their angry hours.”

During this brief time period the prospect is open to a recruiting discussion because something has recently occurred that makes them angry about their job, their manager, or their company. And for at least a few hours … that anger makes them suddenly receptive to recruiter calls and to new job opportunities.

Timing Is Everything in Sales and Recruiting keep reading…

Encouraging ADP Report May Foreshadow Strong Government Numbers

by Oct 1, 2014, 12:10 pm ET

ADP comparison change for Sept 2014With the announcement this morning that September’s private company payrolls grew by 213,000, economists are optimistic it foreshadows an even-more-robust government report due Friday. keep reading…

Experience Is Overrated — Arguments for Hiring Talented Individuals Without Perfect Credentials

by and Sep 8, 2014, 12:09 am ET

Southwest Airlines listening centerOrville Wright did not have a pilot’s license –slogan used at Facebook to warn hiring managers not to overly focus on credentials

I, the lead author, have 40 years of experience working in the talent space. But given that experience, I still don’t understand why recruiters and hiring managers place such an unwavering emphasis on hiring only individuals with “direct experience” (i.e. experience working with the specific job title that they’ve applied for). So despite my extensive personal experience and education, I agree with the conclusion reached by Google, Facebook, and most startups that many of the best hires are those whose education, experience, and other credentials are not a perfect “fit” for a job opening.

The Track Record of Those With No Direct Experience or Weak Credentials Is Impressive keep reading…

August’s 142,000 Jobs Is Weakest Growth This Year

by Sep 5, 2014, 9:42 am ET

Econ indicators Aug 2014 v2Even taking into account the usual summer hiring slowdown, this morning’s jobs report from the U.S. Labor Department can only be called surprising. The Department’s Bureau of Labor Statistics said 142,000 new jobs were created in August, a number far off the 220,000 to 230,000 economists forecast. Unemployment inched down to 6.1 percent from 6.2 percent.

It was the smallest increase yet this year, and follows six months of gains over 200,000 jobs each. Going into August, the monthly average gain in new jobs was 230,000.

Yesterday’s private sector jobs report from ADP and Moody Analytics foreshadowed a lower August job growth when it came in at 204,000, which was also below expectations. Few, though, expected so big a decline, which was also accompanied by a net downward revision of June and July’s numbers of 28,000.

The slight decline in the unemployment rate came from fewer working-age Americans participating in the labor force. The participation rate in August dropped back to 62.8 percent from 62.9 percent, hovering near historic lows. keep reading…

Refusing to Hire Overqualified Candidates – a Myth That Can Hurt Your Firm

by Aug 25, 2014, 12:31 am ET

Imagine being assigned a physician and then purposely rejecting them solely because they were “overqualified” for your medical situation. Well that’s exactly what happens when hiring managers reject candidates who have “too many” qualifications.

There is simply no excuse in this new era of data-based recruiting to adhere to this old wives’ tales” in hiring. I have written in the past about the cost of rejecting “job jumpers” and in this article, I will focus on the false assumption that hiring candidates who are “overqualified” will result in frustrated employees who will quickly quit. There is simply no data to prove any of the negative assumptions that are often made about overqualified prospects or candidates.

There Are No Proven Performance Issues Related to Being Overqualified keep reading…

Don’t Listen to the Naysayers — You Do Need Creatives

by Aug 15, 2014, 12:56 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-07-03 at 9.57.56 AMIf you’re not a “creative,” you’ve probably been annoyed by a creative’s lack of organization or follow-through at some point. You may even be reveling in the recent onslaught of articles arguing that creative employees only waste time and money.

But no matter how “Type A” you are, you can’t afford to overlook creatives’ potential in this increasingly innovation-focused market. keep reading…

Time to Fill Has Longest Duration Since 2001

by Aug 14, 2014, 4:46 am ET

time to fill by industryThe time to fill open positions has reached a national average of just about 25 days, the lengthiest job vacancy period in the 13 years covered by the DICE‐DFH Vacancy Duration Measure.

The monthly report on time to fill and recruiting efforts says that on average it took 24.9 working days (Monday-Saturday) in June to post, source, and hire a new employee. That’s more than nine days longer than it took at the height of the recession in July 2009. Then, the average was 15.3 working days.

The report produced by careers sites publisher Dice Holdings Inc. follows a report Tuesday from the Labor Department on job openings and turnover. The report showed there were more job openings in the country — 4.7 million as of the last day of June — than at any time since February 2001. In June 2013, there were 4 million openings. keep reading…

5 Recruitment Practices That Are Hurting Your Organization

by Aug 11, 2014, 12:01 am ET

labor stats.jpg

Some recruiting tactics are actually doing more harm than good, reducing the organization’s candidate pool and tarnishing its reputation in the process.

Check if your organization’s recruitment department follows any of these pervasive behaviors setting the wrong standards: keep reading…

How to Really Calculate the Cost of Employee Turnover

by Jul 18, 2014, 12:56 am ET

Employee turnover costs are often described with generic numbers such as “$X,000.00 per employee” or “X% of annual salary” (actual dollar amounts and percentages vary from source to source). It is tempting to go with simple sound bites like these, but keep in mind that they are based on averages. These overall tendencies probably don’t accurately describe your specific organization, department, or team.

The following is a simple but detailed method of computing the cost of employee turnover. The main factors in this calculation (aside from specific costs) are time and money involved with a departing employee, such as:

  • Time spent on filling the vacant position;
  • Hours/weeks in lost productivity before the employee leaves
  • Time that coworkers and the manager/supervisor combined will need to make up for the vacant employee (overtime, added shifts, etc.);
  • Number of hours in lost productivity resulting from orientation and training of a new employee; and
  • Time spent on admin and hiring tasks (advertising, resume screening, interviewing, onboarding).

We can directly translate between time and money (time = $) to provide specific costs by multiplying hours by hourly wage for different types of employees, tasks, and responsibilities. The numbers that you provide can either be averages for your organization, department, or team, or they can be specific to a single turnover event. The calculation will total all the time and costs spent with every employee turnover so you can determine what the final cost is for your business.

Here are the steps to calculate all of this: keep reading…

What LeBron James Can Teach Us About Hiring

by Jul 14, 2014, 12:16 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-07-13 at 9.17.23 PMI’m amused when sports analysts state their predictions with near certainty. Take for example ESPN’s David Thorpe saying on July 10 that the chances of NBA superstar LeBron James returning to the Miami Heat next season were 99 percent. The following day, James announced he would play for the Cleveland Cavaliers.

We hiring managers and recruiters know you can’t guarantee human performance. The best you can do is conduct pre-employment tests, ask candidates insightful interview questions, gather gobs of important data about them, and then play the percentages based on your analysis of the data.

For example, if Candidate A has a track record of switching jobs every six to nine months and Candidate B has reached 10 years of tenure for her two previous employers, who should you reasonably bet will remain with your company five years from now? There’s no guarantee if you select Candidate B they will stay with your organization a long time, but the odds are in your favor.

Which brings me back to LeBron and to an important hiring rule of thumb. keep reading…

How Recruiters Can Create Successful Partnerships With Hiring Managers

by Jul 11, 2014, 12:01 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-07-10 at 1.24.13 PMRecruiters and hiring managers’ shared goal is to fill positions with top talent. So why do they often end up frustrated with each other? Most often, it’s because hiring managers and recruiters have different perspectives and approaches when it comes to hiring.

The only person you can change is you. Take on the responsibility to be a guide, to provide value by serving to help the hiring manager succeed, and in doing so, create a spirit of partnership. Here is some guidance to help you forge a successful working relationship with hiring managers. keep reading…

The Top 10 Shipwrecks of Hiring Mistakes

by Jul 1, 2014, 12:58 am ET

No one launches a business or accepts an executive position with the goal of incurring unnecessary expenses. Yet, time and again, shipwreck hires cost organizations three-to-five times the hire’s salary. My book The Hiring Compass points out these top 10 hiring mistakes to avoid: keep reading…

Always Open ‘Evergreen Jobs’ Can Improve Your Chances of Recruiting Top Talent

by Jun 30, 2014, 12:22 am ET

treesAs the war for talent continues, it’s time for recruiting leaders and hiring managers to shift to more creative and innovative recruiting solutions. A bold approach that I have been recommending since 1999 is the creation of “evergreen jobs.”

Simply put, these are the one or two most critical corporate jobs where you literally continuously search and hire every more-than-qualified applicant who fits the culture in order to ensure that you always have enough talent in these critical positions.

The term evergreen comes from the fact that the jobs are always open, just as an evergreen tree is always green. Now it might initially seem crazy to hire when you don’t have an open job, but the approach has proven to be quite effective. Imagine if you were an NBA basketball team and LeBron James suddenly became available. Would you hire him immediately, even if you didn’t have an open job or requisition? Of course you would. That’s the concept behind evergreen jobs. Evergreen programs frequently cover jobs with high turnover, including nursing, retail (i.e. REI), and call centers. But they work even better in high-impact mission-critical jobs at growing tech firms with large campuses. 

An Evergreen Job Program continually sources top talent in a mission-critical job. But rather than stopping when you create a pipeline of reserve talent, it continuously “over hires” each of the “more-than-qualified” applicants, in order to create a talent surplus in this critical job.

The Top 10 Reasons Why the Evergreen Job Approach Is So Impactful keep reading…