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corporaterecruiting RSS feed Tag: corporaterecruiting

If Martian Executives Visited Recruiting … What Would They Find Missing?

by Oct 27, 2014, 12:33 am ET

MarsIt may seem like a strange proposition at first, but what if an experienced business executive who knew nothing about recruiting visited and took a snapshot assessment of your function?

Obviously even a Martian executive would be able to quickly find and understand traditional recruiting functions like employer branding, sourcing, and interview processes. But what would they find missing? In other words, what standard business elements that exist in every other business function and process (like production, product development, supply chain, or marketing) would an outsider be surprised to find totally absent from your corporate recruiting function?

If you are a recruiting leader and one of your goals is to be “more businesslike,” you might be surprised at the number of common business process elements that simply can’t be found in corporate recruiting.

Business Process Elements That Are Almost Always Absent From Recruiting

If you were a strong business person who assessed the recruiting function, you might be surprised to find that many business process elements are simply missing. Those missing elements include: keep reading…

Time to Kill the Requisition?

by Oct 7, 2014, 12:48 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-09-30 at 12.58.31 PMMost corporate recruiting teams still rely on requisition-based hiring. In most cases this means they focus on recruiting for openings as they arise using whatever recruiting channels yield the “right” talent readily available. Unfortunately their processes don’t typically yield the best talent as quickly as needed, leaving operational teams frustrated with the results.

The solution is to have a pipeline of talent at the ready when a new position arises. keep reading…

Score Some Winning Insight From a Sports Recruiter’s Perspective

by Sep 16, 2014, 12:59 am ET

Mel playing soccerRecently, I’ve become immersed in some unfamiliar recruiting territory — collegiate sports! As I work with my son, a student athlete, to navigate the college exploration process, I’m noticing many similarities between these two worlds of talent search.

Last month, I met Jay, a sports recruiter/scout who has placed numerous incredible college athletes through the years. Many of his “picks” have gone on to play sports professionally. Jay and I spoke at length about our industries and I asked him the secrets to his success as a recruiter, albeit in another realm.

If you find solutions to your professional challenges by looking to other industries, read his valuable perspective on sports recruiting success, as well as my related observations. keep reading…

Workforce Speed — the Most Impactful Talent Factor That No One Is Managing

by Sep 15, 2014, 12:50 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-09-11 at 2.22.46 PMI work in the Silicon Valley, where we have a long-established mantra of “faster, cheaper and better.” But now no matter where you work in the world, almost everyone can sense the fact that every aspect of global business now seems to move significantly faster than it did even 10 years ago. You could even label the 21st century as “the century when speed dominated.” This increased speed means that new products and product features come to market at an amazing rate, copying is almost immediate, everything you rely on seems to become quickly obsolete, and long-established businesses routinely lose out to faster moving startups.

In this environment, even notable fast-mover firms like Google and Apple occasionally don’t move fast enough. This was the case where they both failed to effectively seize on the amazing social media and microblogging opportunities that the faster-moving startups Facebook and Twitter quickly dominated.

In the past, the business domination rule was simple … Large and established firms will dominate the smaller ones.

However the new rule has become “It’s the fast-moving and rapidly adapting firms that now dominate the slower ones, whether they are large or small.”

If Your Firm Changes Slower Internally Than the External World, it Has No Future keep reading…

Recruiting Isn’t Enough Anymore; Business Advising is the New Norm for Corporate Recruiters

by Sep 11, 2014, 6:43 pm ET

Screen Shot 2014-09-11 at 3.02.46 PMMost recruiting leaders have had coffee-shop or happy-hour conversations with each other about “having a seat at the table” or being a “more strategic partner” to the business. There is no doubt these clichés are played out (and there’s a good chance you’re rolling your eyes at the thought of reading another article about this). The truth is, there are talent-acquisition departments that talk about having a seat at the table; heck, they might even lobby so hard to get to this “table” they get a pity invite.

But, for as many of those that are worrying about a “table” there’s the other side of the house: departments hard at work building teams that help their business use human capital to win in the marketplace.

This is no easy task. It’s a grind. But there’s great work going on in our industry right now by many talent-acquisition leaders showing a commitment to this approach.  Some of those very leaders you’ll meet at ERE next week.

At CDW, we built a high-performing talent acquisition team by developing business- and HR-savvy recruiters. keep reading…

Today’s Rant: Consistency as a Goal

by Sep 10, 2014, 2:54 pm ET

Now, I’m not an anti-consistency guy at all. To scale, to create a great experience, you need to make sure certain things are predictable and dependable. For example, every candidate should know their status in a process and what the next step is (and timeline of that next step).

But, sometimes, consistency becomes the goal itself, not a means to a goal. And in a talent-centric world – where we preach personalization, creating a stand out experience, tailoring the process/tools/approach to the person — consistency can get in the way, and even create a bad experience.   keep reading…

3 Lessons Corporate In-house Recruiting Organizations Can Learn from Staffing Agencies

by Sep 5, 2014, 12:05 am ET

On average, 118 people apply for any given job — and of those 118 candidates, only 23 actually get an interview. This conundrum begs the question: are employers building the best candidate pools? Staffing agencies and corporations face an identical challenge — attracting the right candidates to begin with.

Enticing a precise type of person to fill one very specific role is like searching for a needle in a haystack. You will end up with strict criteria, and an endless list of names of people who miss the mark. To fill your candidate pool with greater potential, take a page from the staffing agency playbook. Start with these three ideas:  keep reading…

Do a Happy Dance ‘Cuz You’re A Corporate Recruiter

by Aug 15, 2014, 3:50 am ET

norm as hatchet manThis week Roundup brings you a collection of recruiting items truly  worthy of the tag “roundup.”

For your water-cooler chatter pleasure, I offer you a recruiting video from China, news about how some of you have a happy job, and a job posting from the Postal Service which is seeking a RIFmaster.

(Note to pop culture enthusiasts: The picture here relates to that last item. Points to everyone who can identify the show and the character. Extra points for the episode.) keep reading…

What Successful Recruiters Are Doing Right

by Aug 13, 2014, 12:02 am ET

team_leader_free_stock_photo_bYesterday I listed seven operational habits that characterize unsuccessful recruiters. In this second part, I examine not only the actions that distinguish the successful recruiters, but also the talent mindset that must be adopted. It is the capacity to embrace a “paradigm shift” in your recruiting philosophy that really determines how successful you will be in your talent acquisition efforts.

First, let’s stop fooling ourselves.  keep reading…

What Unsuccessful Recruiters Are Doing Wrong

by Aug 12, 2014, 12:12 am ET

 recruitment-sample-mdMost strategic recruiters seek to optimize the three most important factors in talent acquisition — cost, time, and quality. However, that objective is often impossible to accomplish because recruiters continue to use outdated talent processes which were designed back in the 1980s.

Stephen Covey, in his ground-breaking best seller — 7 Habits of Highly Effective People – introduces timeless principles that form the framework of the changes that individuals must adopt to become more effective. But, before one can embrace the seven habits, Covey proposes adopting of a “paradigm shift”– a change in perception and interpretation of how the world really works. Similarly, recruiters must be willing to adopt a paradigm shift in how they view the world of talent acquisition — if they hope to be successful in sourcing, recruiting, and hiring the very best talent in today’s war for talent.

For example, it has been my experience that “average” to “good” recruiters follow similarly dated talent strategies:  keep reading…

Recruiter Development as an Exercise in Cooperation: Donate Yourself!

by Jul 22, 2014, 12:25 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-06-03 at 5.11.44 PMIf you work in recruiting in any capacity, ask yourself this question: “When was the last time someone really invested in making me better?”

Then give yourself the responsibility of that development for someone/everyone around you.

Why would we do that? Who has time for that? Where should I start? If this is what comes up top of mind, you might owe it to yourself to put some thought into this topic. I’ll tell you why I think it’s not only a business imperative but a preservation technique as well. keep reading…

How Recruiters Can Create Successful Partnerships With Hiring Managers

by Jul 11, 2014, 12:01 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-07-10 at 1.24.13 PMRecruiters and hiring managers’ shared goal is to fill positions with top talent. So why do they often end up frustrated with each other? Most often, it’s because hiring managers and recruiters have different perspectives and approaches when it comes to hiring.

The only person you can change is you. Take on the responsibility to be a guide, to provide value by serving to help the hiring manager succeed, and in doing so, create a spirit of partnership. Here is some guidance to help you forge a successful working relationship with hiring managers. keep reading…

Grading Hiring Managers

by Jul 3, 2014, 12:09 am ET

We already talked about the letter grade you give corporate recruiting departments.

Let’s take a look at the grade you gave managers. keep reading…

Grading the Performance of a Recruiting Department

by Jun 20, 2014, 1:51 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-06-19 at 2.22.12 PMWhat grade would you give the performance of your company’s recruiting department?

That’s a question we asked you in ERE’s State of Recruiting Survey.

I can sum up the results in one letter: keep reading…

Don’t Call Recruiting Recruiting

by Jun 6, 2014, 12:18 am ET

Who the recruiting department should report to is one thing. Then there’s the whole issue of what this department should be called.

In the State of Recruiting Survey, we asked, “What’s your preferred ‘label’ for the corporate (in-house) department that handles recruiting?

You said: keep reading…

Why I Left Corporate Recruiting

by May 28, 2014, 5:59 am ET

As many of you may have read in my previous post, “What Drives Me Nuts About Staffing Agencies,” my belief is that there’s not strong differentiation in the staffing vendor world. Too often sales pitches don’t strongly reinforce their key differences in building a business case. Said another way, most firms seem to be focused on business development and not recruiting quality.

That’s a broad brush to paint the industry with and there are certainly several very strong local and national firms, but that seems to be the overall client perspective of staffing firms. With that in mind, I recently decided to move out of corporate recruiting and start a recruiting practice (actually two different firms) with an eye to doing things differently.

Our primary business which makes outbound candidate cold calls to licensed professionals, primarily in healthcare. Our second firm is a contingency practice focused on the dental space.

I decided to make the move to: keep reading…

Maybe Reporting to HR Isn’t All Bad

by May 26, 2014, 12:47 am ET

Every so often there’s a proposal on this site to move recruiting to … somewhere. Anywhere. Anywhere but HR.

Marketing, for instance.

Or, as some separate function. Some say it needs to be under the CEO.

But that’s not unanimous. keep reading…

Next Year Won’t Be a Cakewalk Either

by May 16, 2014, 5:39 am ET

painNow that we established that 2014 is tougher than 2013, let’s take a look at 2015. keep reading…

Steps for Increasing Your Speed of Hire in Order to Improve Your Quality of Hire, Part 1 of 2

by Apr 28, 2014, 5:15 am ET

This two-part in-depth article covers the how-to steps that corporate recruiters can use to speed up their hiring process. Speed of hire is an important topic for recruiting leaders because without it you won’t be able to successfully land high-quality candidates who are in and out of the job market quickly. This article is a follow up to last week’s companion article “The Top 12 Reasons Why Slow Hiring Severely Damages Recruiting And Business Results.”

How Much Money Slow Hiring Costs a Firm

Of course costs vary depending on the organization and the job, but as a rule of thumb, I estimate that the “on job performance” of those you hire into competitive jobs decreases by as much as 1 percent for every extra day that you delay a hiring decision. So if you add just 10 days to your normal average time to fill, you can expect the “on the job performance” of your new hire to drop by 10 percent. For a firm like Amazon, a 10 percent drop in its average revenue per employee of $750,000 would mean a loss of $75,000 for every new hire. Obviously this amount is many times higher than the standard cost per hire and it is a significant dollar loss that is almost always unreported.

Steps in the Hiring Process That Are the Biggest Bottlenecks to Hiring Speed keep reading…

In-House Recruiting Survey Unveiled This Morning at ERE Conference

by Apr 23, 2014, 3:47 pm ET

Grade B slideWith a self-assigned grade of B, and an even lower C+ from the hiring managers whose jobs they fill, recruiting leaders from companies large and small heard the news there’s much to do to improve those scores, and that the road is not going to get easier in the year ahead.

Speaking to the opening session of the ERE Recruiting Conference & Expo here in San Diego, ERE’s CEO Ron Mester told the hundreds of talent acquisition leaders in direct language that “You have a lot of work to do to improve … No one should be satisfied with a C+ or a B.” At another point in his hour-long presentation of a broad and extensive ERE survey of recruiters, their leaders, their bosses, CEOs and hiring managers, Mester said it will take a rethinking of the process to get to an A. “Rethink it,” he urged. “Challenge everything that you’re doing today.”

Unveiling some of the findings of the late March survey completed by more than 1,300 during his State of Recruiting presentation, Mester turned a spotlight on the disconnect between what the respondents agree should be the key measures of recruiting’s performance and what recruiting leaders and their teams believe is where the actual emphasis lies. keep reading…