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college RSS feed Tag: college

As IT Pay Rises and Students Pursue the ‘Big Names,’ Mid-Size Firms Work Harder to Hire

by
John Zappe
Apr 9, 2014, 5:59 am ET

Starting salaries NACE computer 2014This year, U.S. colleges will graduate somewhere around 124,000 information technology majors.

Most of them (61 percent) will head straight into the workforce, where the average starting salary for these new grads averages $59,000. Those with masters and PhDs, and those in high-demand specialties like security, will earn much more.

Where they want to work is not much of a surprise: Google, Microsoft, Apple, Amazon, and Facebook top the list of their ideal employers, according to a Universum survey.

Besides having the advantage of an internationally known brand — of the 100 employers on Universum’s list, not one can be considered even a mid-sized company — the biggest employers have been scouting colleges for months; a few began nurturing their future candidates when the kids were still in high school. Now, with graduation looming, these employers have largely completed filling their incoming IT class of 2014.

Competing with the big name firms is not easy, agree Chris Jenkins and Lindsay Kulla. “It’s always tough competing with the Facebooks, Google, Amazons,” says Jenkins, who is senior recruiting manager for kCura, a young Chicago software firm that serves the legal industry. keep reading…

Recruiting Against the Private Sector: What Government Can Do to Better to Compete for Talent From Campus

by
John Flato and Bob Lavigna
Apr 2, 2014, 5:57 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-03-17 at 6.57.27 AMIn a previous article, we described the keen interest in employment in the public sector by millenials. Federal employment provides many of the most important attributes that students identify as attractive for their careers. This is evidenced by federal agencies being chosen among the top “ideal employers” identified in Universum’s student survey of tens of thousands of college students: the Federal Bureau of Investigation, National Institutes of Health, Peace Corps, Department of State, and NASA, to name a few. However, despite the appeal of public sector careers, most government agencies are quite inefficient in their recruiting and selection processes and consequently lose many top candidates to the private sector.

Compounding this handicap is the fact that the job market for new campus graduates has heated up once again. According to the 2014 National Association of Colleges and Employers survey, employers plan to increase their hiring from the class of 2014 by 7.8 percent for their U.S. operations. While the job market is certainly tough for some recent graduates, the most sought-after candidates are receiving multiple offers with higher salaries. Agency recruiting and hiring practices must change to effectively for the desired talent.

Here are 11 suggestions that the public sector might deploy that parallel successful practices in the private sector: keep reading…

The 2014 ERE Recruiting Excellence Award Winners

by
Todd Raphael
Mar 19, 2014, 5:07 am ET

ere-awards-logo-2014You saw the list of finalists — a group that, like I said in that post, really all are honorees given how close of a call most every category was, and how many good applications there were that didn’t make the final cut.

Now let’s look at the final winners. Thanks again to the judges.

Best College Recruiting Program keep reading…

One Way to Tell How Many Job Candidates Are Graduating

by
Todd Raphael
Mar 17, 2014, 4:35 pm ET

The largest schools for engineers in the Chicago area.

A company that helps employers examine the labor supply of such potential employees as truckers, nurses, and retailers, as well as physical therapists and women in IT, is out with a new tool for measuring the number of people graduating. keep reading…

Making Moneyball Work

by
Raghav Singh
Mar 11, 2014, 5:47 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-02-20 at 10.45.35 PMBreaking News: (July 16, 2036) The national Comprehensive and Reliable Assessment of Performance (CRAP) database reached its goal of 100 percent coverage with the last employer — Roto Rooter of Northern Idaho — getting connected to share employee performance data. Employers nationwide now have a central resource to evaluate candidates for jobs, using the concept of Moneyball that was developed in the late 20th century. The database, established by the Dream On Act, is administered by the BUFFOONS (Bureau of Unreliable and Freely Flexible Or Objectionable Numbers and Statistics) at the Department of Labor.

Maybe this will come to pass, but don’t hold your breath and be careful what you wish for. Let’s think about what it’ll take to make Moneyball work. keep reading…

Why MOOCs Might Revolutionize Your Recruiting Methods

by
Kevin Wheeler
Mar 4, 2014, 12:00 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-02-19 at 12.58.52 PMWhile recruiters continue to gain skills in search techniques, candidates are elusive and wary of getting unsolicited emails, InMails, and efforts to get them engaged with your firm on Facebook or LinkedIn.

Recruiters should also be much smarter about how they find and engage with candidates. A really good candidate has no need for trivial engagement with you and knows that he or she can easily find another position. The best recruiters use a targeted strategy to identify which candidates are most likely to not only have the skills their organization needs, but which ones are staying current in their field, are learning new skills, and which ones are motivated to work hard.

Younger candidates are attracted to firms that offer access to learning opportunities and older candidates are anxious to gain current, relevant skills.

There may be no better way to do this than to look in-depth at what MOOCs have to offer. keep reading…

Recruiting High School and Non-degreed Top Talent — A Missed Corporate Opportunity

by
Dr. John Sullivan
Mar 3, 2014, 5:43 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-02-26 at 12.55.50 PMIn case you didn’t hear about it, college football powerhouse Alabama recently offered a scholarship to eighth-grade football player Dylan Moses and LSU offered a scholarship to a ninth grader. Before you react in shock as a parent might, consider the fact that teenage talent may be the last remaining untapped corporate recruiting pool.  keep reading…

Talent Management Lessons From the Super Bowl for Corporate Leaders

by
Dr. John Sullivan
Feb 3, 2014, 6:36 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-01-30 at 10.43.50 AMA couple years back I was asked to outline “the future of talent management” in a talk at Google headquarters. Then as now, I predicted the future of talent management will follow the “professional sports model,” which many of you undoubtedly witnessed during yesterday’s Super Bowl.

Some in HR carelessly make the mistake of instantly dismissing sports analogies as irrelevant, but those individuals fail to understand that the NFL and its teams are multibillion-dollar businesses with the same economic bottom line and the need to dominate competitors as any other corporate businesses. So if you want some talent creds, tell your boss that you watched the Super Bowl not just for enjoyment, but also in order to learn some valuable talent management lessons. My top eight talent management takeaways from the Super Bowl are listed below. keep reading…

Remote College Recruiting — Capturing Top Students From Schools You Don’t Visit

by
Dr. John Sullivan
Nov 25, 2013, 6:45 am ET

Screen Shot 2013-11-16 at 8.02.32 AMMany exceptional students probably do not attend the schools that you visit

If you assume that the best students only attend the top ranked schools, you are making a big mistake. keep reading…

College Recruiting — Capturing ‘Passive’ Students Who Don’t Visit the Career Center

by
Dr. John Sullivan
Nov 18, 2013, 6:46 am ET

How Your Current College Approach Misses Top Talent 

Unlike modern “experienced hire” recruiting, most college recruiting is neither scientific nor data-driven. A majority of college programs run on tradition, which means that they rely almost exclusively on students attending information sessions and then interviewing students through the campus career center.

Unfortunately, relying primarily on the career center will cause you to miss out on as much as 50 percent of the undergraduate campus population.

ohio unionThe reason that the traditional approach now misses so many students is because the nature of college students and the college experience have changed dramatically over the last few years. Students are no longer a homogenous group where everyone is actively seeking a job. What is needed instead is a modern “segmented recruiting approach” that is designed to capture the many students who the career center model will miss. This ignored group includes “passive” non-job seeking students, those going to grad school, entrepreneurs, students getting online degrees, older students who feel out of place in the career center, night students, students at campuses you can’t afford to visit, and fresh/sophomores who are not yet eligible for CCC interviews.

This article describes how you can dramatically improve your college recruiting results by also targeting these “passive students” who, because they are not actively seeking an immediate job, cannot be identified or recruited through the campus career center. keep reading…

Now Hiring: No Experience Required

by
Todd Raphael
Sep 25, 2013, 6:31 am ET

Bethany-PerkinsYou know how it works: if the candidate has the right number of years of experience, doing the right things at the right company in the right industry, voila! They make it through the applicant tracking system.

That’s not quite the case at one company, called Software Advice. Bethany Perkins heads up human resources and recruiting at the Austin, Texas, organization that’s not fixated on what many others are.

She and I talk about what criteria she looks for in a candidate — if experience is not the be-all-end-all — and how she judges whether people meet that criteria. We also touch on whether a college degree matters or it doesn’t.

The eight-minute video is below. keep reading…

ERE Chicago, Day 2: College Recruiting — It’s All About the Interns

by
John Hollon
Sep 19, 2013, 5:44 am ET

ere-falllogo-facebookWhen you see a conference session titled Straight from the Source: What’s Really on the Minds of the New Generations of Top Candidates, well, it’s something you just have to hear.

Add in that fact that it is being led by Gerry Crispin and Mark Mehler of CareerXroads, two very smart and savvy guys, and you can see why this not only played to a full house but was also a great way to kick off the second full day of the Fall 2013 ERE Recruiting Conference & Expo in Chicago.

The charm of this session — and it has been done at ERE conferences before — is that it gets bright, young in-demand job seekers (and some are newly hired) to talk about just what it is that they have experienced as interns and first-time job seekers, and how that plays with people of their generation. keep reading…

Google, EY, Goldman Sachs, and PwC Top This Most-attractive Employers List

by
Todd Raphael
Sep 17, 2013, 11:00 am ET

You may have heard this song before, but Google is atop a list of desired employers. After that comes, in order, Goldman Sachs, PwC, Microsoft, Apple, Deloitte, KPMG, Coca-Cola, and P&G.

Universum Global surveyed 200,000 students and put together two rankings of the world’s most attractive employers, one for business students and one for engineering students. The students were surveyed in Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, France, Germany, India, Italy, Japan, Russia, UK, and USA.

Here’s a look at the business list (left) and the engineering list (right) of the “world’s most attractive employers.” keep reading…

The New College-grad Test Is Better Than GPA, But Proceed With Caution

by
Dr. Wendell Williams
Aug 29, 2013, 6:45 am ET

cae-logoAs long as I have been in business, hiring managers have been trying to pin a magic number on job candidates in the hope it will indicate future job performance. Sometimes that number is a GPA, combined test score, or even past earnings. Now we have the Collegiate Learning Assessment (CLA+) … a test given to new college graduates and scored like the SAT. But guess what? Magic numbers are just that … magic!

Magic is the art of illusion. That is, a magician creates illusions using sleight of hand that deceives the audience. Hiring decisions based on a number are sleight of hand because they lead people to think everything about a person can be reduced to a few digits. But anyone with enough years on the job and the professional savvy to systematically compare job performance to pre-employment test scores (i.e., studies … not stories) knows this is only part of the performance story. keep reading…

What’s a Degree Worth? A New Test Will Help Employers Know What a Graduate Has Learned

by
Raghav Singh
Aug 29, 2013, 1:18 am ET

Letterman-BuildingIs a degree from Harvard worth more than one from Oklahoma State? By how much? A year at Harvard costs $52,650 versus about $9,000 at OSU. So is a graduate of Harvard almost six times better than one of OSU?

You may soon be able to tell, courtsey of a new test called the Collegiate Learning Assessment that supposedly provides an objective, benchmarked report card for critical-thinking skills. keep reading…

The Top 10 Best Approaches for Winning The ‘War For College Talent’

by
Dr. John Sullivan
Aug 26, 2013, 6:00 am ET

3381_Wyatt Hall WindowStudents 2011College recruiting has been in the doldrums during most of the economic downturn, and as a result there have been few strategic changes in it, even though the rest of the recruiting function has undergone major shifts during the downturn. And just in case you haven’t seen it yourself, I am predicting that college recruiting demand is about to explode and the competition will soon reach previous “war for college talent” levels.

This resurgence of interest in college hires is due to a reviving economy but also because of the urgent need in a VUCA world for employees who are creative, innovative, fast-moving and who are comfortable with new technology.

If you are one of the corporate talent leaders who want to get and stay ahead of the competition, the time is ripe for re-examining your college program to see what needs to be done to update it. Start with the college recruiting staff. Make sure that it is staffed with data-driven, experienced recruiting professionals prepared for real change, rather than simply enthusiastic young people whose primary qualification is that they themselves are recent college grads. I’ve put together a list of the top 10 categories of strategic change that could literally propel your program into dominance. They are listed with the most impactful strategic changes appearing first.

Action Steps to Win “the War for College Talent” in 2014 keep reading…

Hiring Generation U: Problems With the Recent Crop of College Grads

by
Raghav Singh
Aug 8, 2013, 6:44 am ET

My recent post on Generation U (underemployed and unemployed) generated an enormous amount of activity on ERE. This is a topic of some interest to recruiters, so in this post I’ll focus on some of the challenges that this generation faces in getting and staying employed. keep reading…

Nabbing the Best and Brightest Millennials for Your Company

by
Hally Pinaud
Aug 2, 2013, 6:16 am ET

west-hall-highLike most generations, millennials have been branded with a variety of stereotypes. A Pew Research Center quiz, “How Millennial Are You,” gets to the core of the stereotype by asking questions like “How many text messages have you sent/received in the last 24 hours?” and “In the past 24 hours, did you read a daily newspaper or not?” and then delivering a score based on how much you align with the millennial mindset. A lot of people take these quizzes for fun (including myself, who scored a 77 … should I be concerned?). But with millennials expected to make up half the workforce by 2020, understanding their common behaviors and preferences, especially in a workplace context, is no joke. keep reading…

88 Pages of New Guidelines for College Recruiting

by
Todd Raphael
Jul 19, 2013, 12:56 pm ET

nace_logoA sweeping set of suggestions for college recruiting has been released by the National Association of Colleges and Employers.

The useful PDF includes guidelines for university relations, marketing & branding, candidate sourcing & assessment, onboarding, legal issues, and more. You’ll find some good metrics.

In development since last year, it’s essentially a set of practices organizations could follow in their college recruiting programs, and in assessing how well those programs are working.

Private-sector companies like Raytheon, KPMG, BP, and EY helped in putting together the guide.

Generation U: Too Many Underemployed College Grads

by
Raghav Singh
Jul 19, 2013, 6:36 am ET

Screen Shot 2013-07-08 at 3.34.55 PMRecent college grads today face some of the worst job prospects since the great depression. A survey by the Associated Press found that over 50 percent — about 1.5 million — are either unemployed or in jobs that don’t require a college degree. The AP survey found that recent grads were “more likely to be employed as waiters, waitresses, bartenders, and food-service helpers than as engineers, physicists, chemists, and mathematicians combined. There were more working in jobs such as receptionists or payroll clerks than in all computer professional jobs. More also were employed as cashiers, retail clerks, and customer representatives than engineers.”

The only category of grads that saw gains was those with advanced degrees — 98.3 percent of job gains were realized by those with advanced degrees.

Underemployment and unemployment varies a great deal depending on the major. Not surprisingly, students who graduated with degrees in the sciences or other technical fields, such as accounting, are much less likely to be jobless or underemployed than humanities and arts graduates.

The Skills Mismatch keep reading…