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college RSS feed Tag: college

In IT, College Degrees Take Backseat to Skills, Experience

by Aug 29, 2014, 5:28 am ET

Glassodoor Q2 employee surveyBy a surprisingly large percentage, CIOs put more emphasis on skills and experience than on tech degrees from prestigious universities.

A Robert Half Technology survey of some 2,400 chief information officers at companies with more than 100 employees found 71 percent place “more weight on skills and experience than on whether or not a candidate attended college/university.” Another 12 percent said university prestige didn’t matter at all. keep reading…

Employer Branding Beats Consumer Branding for Young Job-Seekers

by Aug 5, 2014, 12:29 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-07-21 at 7.31.34 AMTwo studies recently came out that provide interesting perspectives on how a brand is viewed by the general public and by young workers looking to start their careers. These surveys illustrate both the connection and disconnection between branding and employer branding.

The first study was conducted by CoreBrand, which annually surveys more than 10,000 business decision-makers from the top 20 percent of U.S. businesses. This is a survey of peers, not of average consumers. It determines two factors: Familiarity, based on whether respondents could name a brand’s verticals or subsidiaries; and Favorability, based on respondents’ opinions of the brand’s overall reputation, perception of management, and investment potential. CoreBrand considers brands with the highest scores in both categories to be the “Most Respected.” The top 10 of 2014 are: keep reading…

College Career Fairs Are Obsolete

by Jun 13, 2014, 12:03 am ET

career_fair_fall_2012Perhaps I’m being a bit unfair. There are plenty of legitimate reasons for companies to attend college career fairs (where else will all those free pens and t-shirts go?), but rarely does it include discovering and interviewing the best students.

There seems to be a perception among many companies that attending career fairs at a few top universities is enough of an effort when it comes to hiring interns and new-grads. To those companies: The best university recruiting programs don’t focus on career fairs.

There are multiple reasons for this. keep reading…

Mytasca: A New Tool for College Recruiters

by Jun 9, 2014, 7:04 pm ET

BoiseStateUniversityFour years in the making, there’s a new tool out for recruiters to learn more about colleges and career centers. keep reading…

What Students Want in Their First Jobs, and How Government Can Deliver That

by Jun 5, 2014, 5:42 am ET

engagement process.jpgImproving Employee Engagement to Create Government Workplaces That Will Attract and Retain Young People 

We described what young people want in their first “real” jobs, based on Universum research. This year, Universum’s survey of more than 46,000 university students showed that students are looking for jobs that provide characteristics like work/life balance, job security, commitment to a cause, and a dynamic and respectful workplace.

Even with this important information, however, public sector employers face challenges in creating workplaces that incorporate these characteristics and will therefore attract and retain young talent. One proven way for government to meet this challenge is to improve the level of employee engagement. Higher levels of engagement create more attractive workplaces and translate into higher retention as well as improved individual and organizational performance.

The U.S. Merit Systems Protection Board defines employee engagement as a heightened employee connection to work, the organization, the mission, or coworkers. Engaged employees believe their organizations value them, and in return, engaged employees are more likely to expend “discretionary effort” to deliver performance.

There is compelling evidence as to why government agencies, in particular, should care about employee engagement. The Gallup organization has systematically studied employee engagement, and its research reveals that high-engagement organizations are 20 percent more productive than their low-engagement counterparts, and also exceed low-engagement organizations in other critical areas such as customer satisfaction and employee retention.

In government, a Merit Systems Protection Board study of 37,000 federal government employees revealed that higher employee engagement correlated with: keep reading…

MBA Demand Still Slowing, but Some Sectors See Opportunity

by May 19, 2014, 12:09 am ET

May 2014-Demand-for-MBAs-by-IndustryIt has become so fashionable to bash the value of an MBA that there must be a touch of schadenfreude in the accounts of once highly paid professionals sending out resumes for jobs paying half — or less — than what they previously earned.

Yet the situation is hardly as dire as many of the reports would have us believe. While it is true that demand for MBAs has declined, an analysis of online job postings by Wanted Analytics found the reduction in the last few months was only 3 percent over the year before. That’s far better than the alarming report last fall from Michigan State’s Collegiate Employment Research Center, which predicted MBA hiring would plummet 25 percent. keep reading…

The College Recruiting Times They Are a Changin’

by May 15, 2014, 12:55 am ET

SlocumHallWhen it comes to the current landscape of college recruiting, I like to look at what’s going on out there as a three-act play.

Act 1 — The Problem keep reading…

Hilton’s May Agenda Includes 600 Career Events in 54 Countries

by May 2, 2014, 2:38 pm ET

Hilton_Residence_High_TwoBedLivingroom_FPHilton’s launching “Careers@Hilton Live: Youth in Hospitality Month” — a month of 600 events in 54 countries to tell people, especially young ones, about the hospitality field. keep reading…

As IT Pay Rises and Students Pursue the ‘Big Names,’ Mid-Size Firms Work Harder to Hire

by Apr 9, 2014, 5:59 am ET

Starting salaries NACE computer 2014This year, U.S. colleges will graduate somewhere around 124,000 information technology majors.

Most of them (61 percent) will head straight into the workforce, where the average starting salary for these new grads averages $59,000. Those with masters and PhDs, and those in high-demand specialties like security, will earn much more.

Where they want to work is not much of a surprise: Google, Microsoft, Apple, Amazon, and Facebook top the list of their ideal employers, according to a Universum survey.

Besides having the advantage of an internationally known brand — of the 100 employers on Universum’s list, not one can be considered even a mid-sized company — the biggest employers have been scouting colleges for months; a few began nurturing their future candidates when the kids were still in high school. Now, with graduation looming, these employers have largely completed filling their incoming IT class of 2014.

Competing with the big name firms is not easy, agree Chris Jenkins and Lindsay Kulla. “It’s always tough competing with the Facebooks, Google, Amazons,” says Jenkins, who is senior recruiting manager for kCura, a young Chicago software firm that serves the legal industry. keep reading…

Recruiting Against the Private Sector: What Government Can Do to Better to Compete for Talent From Campus

by Apr 2, 2014, 5:57 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-03-17 at 6.57.27 AMIn a previous article, we described the keen interest in employment in the public sector by millenials. Federal employment provides many of the most important attributes that students identify as attractive for their careers. This is evidenced by federal agencies being chosen among the top “ideal employers” identified in Universum’s student survey of tens of thousands of college students: the Federal Bureau of Investigation, National Institutes of Health, Peace Corps, Department of State, and NASA, to name a few. However, despite the appeal of public sector careers, most government agencies are quite inefficient in their recruiting and selection processes and consequently lose many top candidates to the private sector.

Compounding this handicap is the fact that the job market for new campus graduates has heated up once again. According to the 2014 National Association of Colleges and Employers survey, employers plan to increase their hiring from the class of 2014 by 7.8 percent for their U.S. operations. While the job market is certainly tough for some recent graduates, the most sought-after candidates are receiving multiple offers with higher salaries. Agency recruiting and hiring practices must change to effectively for the desired talent.

Here are 11 suggestions that the public sector might deploy that parallel successful practices in the private sector: keep reading…

The 2014 ERE Recruiting Excellence Award Winners

by Mar 19, 2014, 5:07 am ET

ere-awards-logo-2014You saw the list of finalists — a group that, like I said in that post, really all are honorees given how close of a call most every category was, and how many good applications there were that didn’t make the final cut.

Now let’s look at the final winners. Thanks again to the judges.

Best College Recruiting Program keep reading…

One Way to Tell How Many Job Candidates Are Graduating

by Mar 17, 2014, 4:35 pm ET

The largest schools for engineers in the Chicago area.

A company that helps employers examine the labor supply of such potential employees as truckers, nurses, and retailers, as well as physical therapists and women in IT, is out with a new tool for measuring the number of people graduating. keep reading…

Making Moneyball Work

by Mar 11, 2014, 5:47 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-02-20 at 10.45.35 PMBreaking News: (July 16, 2036) The national Comprehensive and Reliable Assessment of Performance (CRAP) database reached its goal of 100 percent coverage with the last employer — Roto Rooter of Northern Idaho — getting connected to share employee performance data. Employers nationwide now have a central resource to evaluate candidates for jobs, using the concept of Moneyball that was developed in the late 20th century. The database, established by the Dream On Act, is administered by the BUFFOONS (Bureau of Unreliable and Freely Flexible Or Objectionable Numbers and Statistics) at the Department of Labor.

Maybe this will come to pass, but don’t hold your breath and be careful what you wish for. Let’s think about what it’ll take to make Moneyball work. keep reading…

Why MOOCs Might Revolutionize Your Recruiting Methods

by Mar 4, 2014, 12:00 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-02-19 at 12.58.52 PMWhile recruiters continue to gain skills in search techniques, candidates are elusive and wary of getting unsolicited emails, InMails, and efforts to get them engaged with your firm on Facebook or LinkedIn.

Recruiters should also be much smarter about how they find and engage with candidates. A really good candidate has no need for trivial engagement with you and knows that he or she can easily find another position. The best recruiters use a targeted strategy to identify which candidates are most likely to not only have the skills their organization needs, but which ones are staying current in their field, are learning new skills, and which ones are motivated to work hard.

Younger candidates are attracted to firms that offer access to learning opportunities and older candidates are anxious to gain current, relevant skills.

There may be no better way to do this than to look in-depth at what MOOCs have to offer. keep reading…

Recruiting High School and Non-degreed Top Talent — A Missed Corporate Opportunity

by Mar 3, 2014, 5:43 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-02-26 at 12.55.50 PMIn case you didn’t hear about it, college football powerhouse Alabama recently offered a scholarship to eighth-grade football player Dylan Moses and LSU offered a scholarship to a ninth grader. Before you react in shock as a parent might, consider the fact that teenage talent may be the last remaining untapped corporate recruiting pool.  keep reading…

Talent Management Lessons From the Super Bowl for Corporate Leaders

by Feb 3, 2014, 6:36 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-01-30 at 10.43.50 AMA couple years back I was asked to outline “the future of talent management” in a talk at Google headquarters. Then as now, I predicted the future of talent management will follow the “professional sports model,” which many of you undoubtedly witnessed during yesterday’s Super Bowl.

Some in HR carelessly make the mistake of instantly dismissing sports analogies as irrelevant, but those individuals fail to understand that the NFL and its teams are multibillion-dollar businesses with the same economic bottom line and the need to dominate competitors as any other corporate businesses. So if you want some talent creds, tell your boss that you watched the Super Bowl not just for enjoyment, but also in order to learn some valuable talent management lessons. My top eight talent management takeaways from the Super Bowl are listed below. keep reading…

Remote College Recruiting — Capturing Top Students From Schools You Don’t Visit

by Nov 25, 2013, 6:45 am ET

Screen Shot 2013-11-16 at 8.02.32 AMMany exceptional students probably do not attend the schools that you visit

If you assume that the best students only attend the top ranked schools, you are making a big mistake. keep reading…

College Recruiting — Capturing ‘Passive’ Students Who Don’t Visit the Career Center

by Nov 18, 2013, 6:46 am ET

How Your Current College Approach Misses Top Talent 

Unlike modern “experienced hire” recruiting, most college recruiting is neither scientific nor data-driven. A majority of college programs run on tradition, which means that they rely almost exclusively on students attending information sessions and then interviewing students through the campus career center.

Unfortunately, relying primarily on the career center will cause you to miss out on as much as 50 percent of the undergraduate campus population.

ohio unionThe reason that the traditional approach now misses so many students is because the nature of college students and the college experience have changed dramatically over the last few years. Students are no longer a homogenous group where everyone is actively seeking a job. What is needed instead is a modern “segmented recruiting approach” that is designed to capture the many students who the career center model will miss. This ignored group includes “passive” non-job seeking students, those going to grad school, entrepreneurs, students getting online degrees, older students who feel out of place in the career center, night students, students at campuses you can’t afford to visit, and fresh/sophomores who are not yet eligible for CCC interviews.

This article describes how you can dramatically improve your college recruiting results by also targeting these “passive students” who, because they are not actively seeking an immediate job, cannot be identified or recruited through the campus career center. keep reading…

Now Hiring: No Experience Required

by Sep 25, 2013, 6:31 am ET

Bethany-PerkinsYou know how it works: if the candidate has the right number of years of experience, doing the right things at the right company in the right industry, voila! They make it through the applicant tracking system.

That’s not quite the case at one company, called Software Advice. Bethany Perkins heads up human resources and recruiting at the Austin, Texas, organization that’s not fixated on what many others are.

She and I talk about what criteria she looks for in a candidate — if experience is not the be-all-end-all — and how she judges whether people meet that criteria. We also touch on whether a college degree matters or it doesn’t.

The eight-minute video is below. keep reading…

ERE Chicago, Day 2: College Recruiting — It’s All About the Interns

by Sep 19, 2013, 5:44 am ET

ere-falllogo-facebookWhen you see a conference session titled Straight from the Source: What’s Really on the Minds of the New Generations of Top Candidates, well, it’s something you just have to hear.

Add in that fact that it is being led by Gerry Crispin and Mark Mehler of CareerXroads, two very smart and savvy guys, and you can see why this not only played to a full house but was also a great way to kick off the second full day of the Fall 2013 ERE Recruiting Conference & Expo in Chicago.

The charm of this session — and it has been done at ERE conferences before — is that it gets bright, young in-demand job seekers (and some are newly hired) to talk about just what it is that they have experienced as interns and first-time job seekers, and how that plays with people of their generation. keep reading…