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The Top 20 Reasons Why Recruiting Is an Exciting and High-Impact Job

by
Dr. John Sullivan
Feb 17, 2014, 5:01 am ET

As a professor in a large business school, I am frequently asked, “What is the most exciting and impactful job in the corporate world?” While others may answer differently, to me the most exciting and impactful job is clearly recruiting.

It is full of excitement because every day as a recruiter you are in a head-to-head competition to attract top talent, and fortunately you know definitively within 90 days whether you have beaten the competition. The impact of a recruiter is twofold: first, you can literally change the life of an individual by placing them in their dream job, and second, you can effectively change the direction and the success of a corporation with a single great hire in a key job (i.e. recruiting LeBron to your NBA team).

So if you’re a college student ready to select a career or someone who is considering shifting into a new career field, I have compiled a list of the many reasons why you should consider becoming a corporate recruiter. keep reading…

I Filled a Job You Didn’t Know You Had

by
Adam Berkowitz
Feb 4, 2014, 6:27 am ET

OK, so you’re a hiring manager, and you’ve just arrived at the office, grabbed your coffee, and opened up your email inbox. There — in boldfaced lettering — the subject line of my email screams

JOB PROPOSAL MEMO.

And you’re thinking … great. Another spam from some job seeker. But you open it anyway.

And that’s how my story at Beyond.com began. keep reading…

I, Robot: How Vulnerable Are Recruiters to Automation?

by
Raghav Singh
Jan 28, 2014, 12:25 am ET

self driving car

A recent study from Oxford University suggests that almost half of all job categories are at some risk of being automated within the next 20 years. That includes telemarketers (99 percent certainty); accountants (94 percent), real estate agents (86 percent); airline pilots (55 percent), and even actors (37 percent).

At low risk are jobs like clergy (0.8 percent); dentists (0.4 percent) and recreational therapists (0.2 percent). What is a recreational therapist anyway? The authors of the study don’t define the job, but it sounds suspiciously like an euphemism for a profession popular in Nevada, which would explain the low probability of the job being automated.

The study doesn’t mention recruiters except to say that big data analysis will result in better predictions of performance, especially of students, and will make recruitment more efficient. keep reading…

The Mastery of Recruiting?

by
Keith Halperin
Jan 7, 2014, 6:41 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-01-02 at 8.40.18 PMMy wife and I watched a fine documentary on TV called Jiro Dreams of Sushi. It was about an 85+-year-old master sushi maker named Jiro Ono who has a 10-seat restaurant in the Tokyo subway. He probably makes the best sushi in the world, and maybe ever. He only serves sushi, and it costs about $300 for 20 pieces. He’d been doing it for about 75 years. The documentary talked about his life, his approach to work, his family (his two sons were in the business), and people who knew/interacted with him.

Here are some interesting quotes (with some editing from me) from the movie. After that, I’ll tell you what this means to you, the recruiter or human resources professional.  keep reading…

Increasing Your Power in Conversations With Hiring Managers and Clients: An essential sales skill every recruiter must develop

by
Nancy Parks
Oct 23, 2013, 6:45 am ET

your way my way.jpgThere you are — ready to pitch your rock star candidate to your hiring manager or client. You are excited about your ability to snag this great prospect in record time, and you are proud of the fact that your candidate is well-qualified for the position. You left a brief message, letting your client or hiring manager know you have found a great prospect. A call is scheduled. You pick up the phone to dial.

As the phone rings, you gather your notes and are feeling confident and prepared; your pitch is bulletproof. As you announce yourself and prepare to share your great news, you hear, “Sorry, but I only have a couple of minutes. All I need to know is if the person you referred to is experienced and will be negotiable on salary.”

You are speechless. Actually, your rock star does not have the exact experience and might not be open to a lot of salary negotiating. Nonetheless, you push forward — trying to recover quickly by reciting the list of the other great things you learned about your prospect, confident these factors will win over your hiring manager or client. But you can’t shake off feeling weak, frustrated, and doomed.

Not the way you envisioned the call going? How’s your confidence now? And what about that bullet-proof pitch? In 29 words — 143 characters — (about a Tweet), you became the victim of the will of your hiring manager or client.

What just happened? More importantly, can you recover? Let’s look at both of these questions and use some basic sales skills to provide some help. keep reading…

Job Seekers’ New Tools: Persona, Balloon

by
Todd Raphael
Oct 22, 2013, 4:05 pm ET

A couple of new tools for job seekers, and by extension of interest to recruiters: keep reading…

New Hershey’s Video Talks Candidly About a Recruiting Job

by
Todd Raphael
Jul 25, 2013, 2:38 pm ET

My friend Bryan Chaney let me know about a new and very interesting video from Hershey’s, where you hear candidly about a talent acquisition job, and a little about the selection process. keep reading…

Generation U: Too Many Underemployed College Grads

by
Raghav Singh
Jul 19, 2013, 6:36 am ET

Screen Shot 2013-07-08 at 3.34.55 PMRecent college grads today face some of the worst job prospects since the great depression. A survey by the Associated Press found that over 50 percent — about 1.5 million — are either unemployed or in jobs that don’t require a college degree. The AP survey found that recent grads were “more likely to be employed as waiters, waitresses, bartenders, and food-service helpers than as engineers, physicists, chemists, and mathematicians combined. There were more working in jobs such as receptionists or payroll clerks than in all computer professional jobs. More also were employed as cashiers, retail clerks, and customer representatives than engineers.”

The only category of grads that saw gains was those with advanced degrees — 98.3 percent of job gains were realized by those with advanced degrees.

Underemployment and unemployment varies a great deal depending on the major. Not surprisingly, students who graduated with degrees in the sciences or other technical fields, such as accounting, are much less likely to be jobless or underemployed than humanities and arts graduates.

The Skills Mismatch keep reading…

New Rite of Passage for Teens: Summer Unemployment

by
John Zappe
Jul 10, 2013, 6:05 am ET

Summer teen hiring 2013A summer job used to be one of those rites of passage for teenagers. Like moving from middle school to high school, and Pop Warner to varsity, working at the local mall, or lifeguarding at the city pool has for many teens become as rare as a drive-in movie.

Though outplacement firm Challenger, Gray & Christmas says the 2013 teen hiring season could still equal last year’s 1.397 million, it would take a July surge not seen since 2010. That July, 457,000 teens between 16 and 19 found jobs, a number tempered by such a slow May hiring month that 2010 saw the fewest teenagers in the decade to find jobs.

“In 2010, employers added just 960,000 16- to 19-year-olds over the entire summer hiring period from May through July,” says John Challenger,  CEO of the global firm. “Hiring has already surpassed that level this year and, if history is any indication, teen employment is likely to grow by another 300,000 to 400,000 in July.” keep reading…

Bank’s Jobs Toolkit Is For Its Customers

by
Todd Raphael
Jul 9, 2013, 1:23 pm ET

ftb-basicHere’s one I don’t see often: a job-seeking toolkit put together for customers of a company. keep reading…

Asian Business Schools Looking for Students … in Los Angeles

by
Todd Raphael
Jun 5, 2013, 3:26 pm ET

asian schoolsSeveral top Asian business schools are putting on an event the Sunday after next, telling future students about careers in Asia. This would not be noteworthy, but for the location of the workshop: Los Angeles.

Yes, the June 16 event at the Athletic Club downtown will touch on career opportunities for Americans in Asia; how hot the economies are in Asian countries; and networking/relationship-building in Asia.

Putting on the event: the China Europe International Business School in Shanghai; Hong Kong University of Science and Technology; Indian School of Business; and the Nanyang Business School in Singapore.

They’re also recruiting students in Vancouver to come to Asia.

Have Your Kids Watch This Video if You Want Them to Program Computers

by
Todd Raphael
May 22, 2013, 5:55 pm ET

This video from Code.org, pointed out to me by my friend Julia Gometz, provides an awfully strong message that being a computer coder is fun, meaningful, and accessible — as in, you don’t have to be a genius to do it.

Stars include Bill Gates, Chris Bosh, and Mark Zuckerberg. keep reading…

Why You Can’t Get A Job … Recruiting Explained By the Numbers

by
Dr. John Sullivan
May 20, 2013, 5:03 am ET

Is your “six seconds of fame” enough to land you a job?

As a professor and a corporate recruiting strategist, I can tell you that very few applicants truly understand the corporate recruiting process. Most people looking for a job approach it with little factual knowledge. That is a huge mistake. A superior approach is to instead analyze it carefully, because data can help you understand why so many applicants simply can’t land a job. If you can bear with me for a few quick minutes, I can show you using numbers where the job-search “roadblocks” are and how that data-supported insight can help you easily double your chances of landing an interview and a job.

Your Resume Will Face a Lot of Competition keep reading…

National Nurses Week: A Reminder of How Great the Demand, How Tight the Supply

by
John Zappe
May 8, 2013, 5:51 pm ET

Medical - Nurse - DoctorToday we pause in the hunt to source RNs to recognize nurses for the work they do and the dedication they bring to a profession that is among the most in-demand recruiting challenges in the U.S.

This is National Nurses Week, and today in particular, is set aside as both National Student Nurses Day and National School Nurse Day. In many of the English-speaking nations of the world, including the U.S. and Canada, May 6-12 is a week to honor professional nurses. The timing coincides with the May 12 birthday of Florence Nightingale, the founder of modern nursing.

Born 197 years ago into a wealthy, upper-class British family, Nightingale would be both amazed and pleased at how the work she did tending the wounded in Crimea has today become in the U.S. a profession of 3.1 million with responsibilities second only to the doctors with whom they work. keep reading…

Let Me Tell You What a Good Recruiting Boss Is

by
Keith Halperin
Apr 24, 2013, 5:53 am ET

I’ve had many recruiting bosses, sometimes in large organizations, sometimes in small. I’ve been privileged to have had a few who have been exceptionally good. Here’s what the good ones had in common, and the sorts of things they would and wouldn’t do. keep reading…

This Is Retail

by
Todd Raphael
Apr 20, 2013, 8:28 pm ET

Screen Shot 2013-04-20 at 5.26.42 PMYou can have a life-long career, not just a spring-break job, at a retail store.

That’s the message the retail industry wants to get through as part of a new campaign it’s launching.

The centerpiece of the campaign is a new website at the “thisisretail.org” address, a highly visual page meant to show that the industry is dynamic and exciting; a field, for example, that’s for you if you’re an artist, a designer, or a marketer.

The National Retail Federation will be gathering stories of people who’ve had good careers in the industry, and trying to spread them on social media sites. It’ll also advertise in print, on the radio, and online to play up retail careers.

Know What You’re Recruiting For

by
Ryan Phillips
Apr 18, 2013, 6:17 am ET

Screen Shot 2013-04-03 at 11.15.16 AMA problem common to most recruiters and human resources professionals today is a lack of understanding the actual job they are trying to fill. It’s really a fine line a recruiter toes, because understanding the role itself is not only imperative for sourcing talent but is also a huge advantage for closing that top passive candidate. The overall understanding of the role itself starts with the job title. If the job title is not a good fit for what you seek, you are likely in big trouble. keep reading…

Here’s How LinkedIn Is Trying to Improve Both Sales and Recruiting

by
Todd Raphael
Apr 16, 2013, 5:53 pm ET

Screen Shot 2013-03-13 at 10.45.39 PMTwo years ago, LinkedIn realized how much it needed not just a lot of good employees quickly but a lot of good recruiters quickly.

It came up with an uncommon answer, one its recruiting director Brendan Browne talked about at today’s ERE conference in San Diego. keep reading…

Wall Street’s Idea of Work / Life Imbalance

by
John Zappe
Mar 29, 2013, 2:49 am ET

bigstock-NEW-YORK-CITY-NY--AUG--Wal-26078330Maybe it’s the season, Passover, Easter, the Spring equinox. You know that whole rebirth, cycle of life thing. Whatever it is, something got BusinessInsider into taking the lipstick off the pig and showing the warts of life on Wall Street.

In 23 frames that no banking recruiter will ever show a candidate, BusinessInsider lists the kinds of Wall Street hell that would make even Dante reconsider whether he should have added a tenth circle. In its own version of “abandon all hope,” BusinessInsider inscribes its entry to the frames: “Click to see how working on the Street ruins your life.” keep reading…

On the Verge of Leaving the Recruiting Calling …

by
Rich Goldberg
Mar 28, 2013, 5:23 am ET

On the verge of leaving the recruiting calling …

I am a second-generation recruit who knew he wanted to be a recruiter. In junior high I’d go to my dad’s office and stuff envelopes of candidates to prospective clients and help rewrite resumes. I went to school and studied HR management and organizational development. After a stint in social work to give back and learn more about how people ticked, I went into recruiting.

I have started departments, trained recruiters and managers on targeted interviewing, and worked for some of the top firms in life sciences and finance — making them able to compete in a global economy.

I have had the privilege to study sourcing from Shally Steckerl and to debate Lou Adler on the art of recruiting. And I read articles each day on the profession of recruiting.

So, I am stunned to say I am done. keep reading…