Receive daily articles & headlines each day in your inbox with your free ERE Daily Subscription.

Not logged in. [log in or register]

bigdata RSS feed Tag: bigdata

Have You Hugged Your Data Today? Notes From the 2014 HR Tech Conference

by Oct 28, 2014, 6:38 am ET

The annual HR Technology Conference always provides a smorgasbord of food for thought. In years past my appetite for content related to talent assessment has not been satisfied. What a difference a few years makes.

This year’s show was packed with valuable information and insights related to the value of talent assessment.  keep reading…

Some Quick Thoughts on Big Data and Metrics

by Oct 17, 2014, 12:08 am ET

common metricsA lot of companies have been talking about big data lately, but what does mean for us in HR and talent acquisition?

Simply put, it is using data to spot trends and make decisions that impact the business. This is no different from what companies have been doing for a while in other functional areas such as finance, corporate strategy, supply chain, and more recently HR. It is just that how this is captured, analyzed, and presented has changed.

Geoffrey Dubiski of Sumner Grace and I once gave a talk on “Recruiting and Your Bottom Line” at an IQPC event.

I think the points we made are still valid. Here’s an outline of some of our thoughts: keep reading…

HR Ranks at the Bottom — Reasons to Adopt Metrics and Predictive Analytics

by Sep 29, 2014, 12:55 am ET

When you survey the most frequent users of analytics and metrics in the corporate world, not surprisingly you find that HR ranks at the very bottom. Compared to finance, which is ranked No. 1, HR compares poorly with only half of its functions being classified as advanced users and three times more HR functions are classified as non-users.

HR shouldn’t be surprised to learn that the executive team came in No. 2 because they (along with finance) are at the forefront of demanding more metrics and analytics from HR. The remaining business functions, operations, R&D, marketing, and sales all had a higher percentage of advanced metrics users than HR in this excellent 2013 AMA/i4cp study. I have been a public advocate of talent management and talent acquisition shifting to a data-based model for decades but the transition at most corporations has been slow, expensive, and painful. Because I give regular presentations on analytics and metrics, I’ve been able to capture a long list of reasons why firms should shift to a data-based model. The remainder of this article is simply a list of credible reasons that resonate with most HR audiences as to why your corporate talent function should embrace metrics and a data-based decision model.

Part I – Reasons Why Every Firm Needs to Shift to Data-based HR Model Using Standard Metrics and Analytics keep reading…

Armed With Data, Kesha Owens Fears No Hiring Manager

by Sep 9, 2014, 12:08 am ET
Kesha Owens

Kesha Owens

When Kesha Owens meets with hiring managers about a req, she goes in armed.

Her weapon of choice? Data.

Data showing the comp for the job locally and nationally. Data showing the number of available candidates and where the supply is greatest and who else is looking for the same candidates. And that’s just part of the ammunition she has these days when she explains to hiring managers why relocation needs to be included or why the comp is too low or … You get the idea.

“Without that data you go into meetings with managers and you are rambling,” says Owens, manager of recruiting and training at Lincoln Electric, a global provider of welding equipment and cutting tools with one of the most studied of business models, including multiple articles published by the Harvard Business School. keep reading…

The Last Strategic Recruiting Frontier — Sourcing Using Consumer Data

by Jul 21, 2014, 12:08 am ET

Recruiting leaders are constantly looking for strategic opportunities, which admittedly are rare in this progressive field. There is only one big missed opportunity in strategic recruiting and that is …  keep reading…

Recruitment is Marketing: 3 Changes You Need to Make

by Jun 25, 2014, 12:04 am ET

Macy'sOnce upon a time we sold products much as we “sell” jobs and organizations today. At the turn of the 20th century, merchants waited for a potential buyer to show up. The buyer was supposed to know what they wanted and ask for it. Most of the merchandise was kept in drawers or under the counter. A customer had to ask for something specifically and the merchant showed them only one particular item. There was no engagement, no selling, and no touting the benefits of the product.

But, soon department stores like Macy’s changed all this by displaying items openly, running ads targeted, in particular, to women. It offered well-known socialites the newest fashions and relied on gossip and word of mouth to attract new referral customers. Window displays created dream worlds and played to emotions. They encouraged salespeople to engage with the customers, build relationships, and even try on clothes or demonstrate the product.

Recruitment has a lot to learn from this story and from marketing. keep reading…

Gamification: Big Data Is Watching

by Apr 15, 2014, 5:07 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-04-09 at 2.19.13 PMRecently, ERE asked me to conduct a webinar on The Impact of Gamification on Generational Talent. It’s an exciting topicworthy of exploration by forward-thinking talent acquisition executives, and in larger context calls for examination of the role of Big Data in business and in our overall culture.

The excitement surrounding Big Data is that web-browsing, location tracking, and social networks can help deliver automated, meaningful measurement of people and predict their behaviors. With our e-mails, social network interactions and mouse clicks able to be mined for insights, and personality-based assessment tests and games that study worker behavior, the ability to measure on a grand scale promises to transform organizational management.

Can Big Data make for a smarter working world, with more efficiently run companies guided by data and analysis? Are there dependable processes for predicting behaviors, skills, and preferences? Welcome to the relatively new field of workforce science, which adds predictive analytics to a hiring and career development playing field that’s long been dominated by gut intuition. keep reading…

All Companies Should Hire Like Google

by Mar 18, 2014, 6:25 am ET
Google - Santa Monica

Google – Santa Monica

I don’t work at Google. I never have. I know multiple managers and former directors in HR & recruiting who’ve been there and shared their experiences. I, like many, have read countless articles on why Google is so great place to work. In terms of products, I’m a fan but not devoted to any cult of Google. Some of its past hiring practices were arrogant, inefficient, and any experienced talent acquisition leader could tell you were a waste of time.

There are articles in the LA Times and elsewhere whose main premises are that Google is ignoring how smart applicants really are by not using intelligence testing any longer. “GPAs are worthless as a criteria for hiring, and test scores are worthless … We found that they don’t predict anything,” noted Lazlo Bock, head of talent at Google. They feel it’d be mistake to follow Google’s lead. I disagree.

I think they’re missing the big point. Companies should hire like Google but adapt to their needs. keep reading…

Making Moneyball Work

by Mar 11, 2014, 5:47 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-02-20 at 10.45.35 PMBreaking News: (July 16, 2036) The national Comprehensive and Reliable Assessment of Performance (CRAP) database reached its goal of 100 percent coverage with the last employer — Roto Rooter of Northern Idaho — getting connected to share employee performance data. Employers nationwide now have a central resource to evaluate candidates for jobs, using the concept of Moneyball that was developed in the late 20th century. The database, established by the Dream On Act, is administered by the BUFFOONS (Bureau of Unreliable and Freely Flexible Or Objectionable Numbers and Statistics) at the Department of Labor.

Maybe this will come to pass, but don’t hold your breath and be careful what you wish for. Let’s think about what it’ll take to make Moneyball work. keep reading…

Moneyball and Recruiting: The Future of Hiring or Pie in the Sky?

by Feb 20, 2014, 12:29 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-02-19 at 9.31.09 PMMoneyball is getting to be the new buzzword in recruiting. We’re supposedly on the cusp of a data-driven revolution in hiring. And it seems one is sorely needed, judging by the state of hiring practices today.

When NASA was just getting started many of the engineers that were hired were chosen only on the basis of their resume and cover letters. That was the norm for many jobs up until the 1950s. Interviews were not common for jobs where the candidates were located far from the worksite — the cost of travel, and even long-distance calls, made them unaffordable. Then employers started using all types of assessments, which would suggest that hiring must have improved dramatically over the 50 years that have elapsed.

One would be wrong to reach that conclusion. keep reading…

What Meteorologists and HR Professionals Have in Common

by Jan 30, 2014, 6:09 am ET

Evolv attritionChances are you haven’t thought of the morning weather report as an example of big data at work. But it is.

Pulling together information from ground weather stations, satellites, ocean buoys, and historical records, meteorologists are able to offer a remarkably accurate prediction of what today’s and tomorrow’s weather will be. Even the seven-day forecast has become far more accurate than not, as the amount of data that figures into each prediction has grown over the years.

This is the growing field of predictive analytics, which, in the case of weather, influences the price of energy on Wall Street, and the supplies a utility lays in, not to mention how you dress for the day ahead.

For years companies have used big (or sometimes little) data to make predictions about everything from the amount of inventory to buy, to the most efficient routing for deliveries, to sales projections for the next quarter and next year. keep reading…

The Top 25 Recruiting Trends, Problems, and Opportunities for 2014, Part 1 of 2

by Dec 9, 2013, 6:17 am ET

Even if you work in a corporate recruiting function with low resources or minimal expectations for change, every recruiter still has a professional obligation to maintain their awareness of the latest trends and predictions. I have grouped 25 predictions of the leading corporate recruiting trends for 2014 into four separate sections. Part 1 includes two sections that cover 14 new opportunities and continuing current trends. Part 2 (to be published next week) includes the final two sections, which cover 11 remaining trends that cover new challenges and areas that will continue to diminish in importance.

Section 1: The Hottest Recruiting Opportunities for 2014 keep reading…

Actionable Predictive Analytics — the Next Big Thing in Talent Management

by Sep 30, 2013, 4:27 am ET

Every leader wants to know what is the “next big thing” in talent management? Well in my book, it is the forward-looking talent management approach known as predictive analytics. If you are unfamiliar with the term, predictive analytics are simply a set of decision-making metrics or statistics that alert or warn decision-makers about upcoming problems and opportunities in talent areas like recruiting and retention. Predictive analytics are clearly superior to traditional HR metrics, which simply tell you what happened last year.

What happened last year is unlikely to be an accurate indicator of what will likely happen this or next year. For example, last year with high unemployment rates and a weak economy, turnover rates were low. But it would be a fatal assumption to assume that those low turnover rates would continue in an improving economy.

Without Action, Big Data Is a Big Waste keep reading…

Is Your Office a Breeding Ground for Gangs?

by Jul 26, 2013, 3:46 pm ET

Office gang signs - freeIn today’s roundup we tackle the complicated and totally interrelated issues of lunchtime neighborhood shopping and the retention rate of hourly workers.

And then we’ll grab a beer.

But first, there’s the matter of office gangs. Got your attention with that one? Actually it’s about the workplaces where 43 percent of employees say cliques exist. (A clique is a gang you can leave without fear of your life.)

CareerBuilder’s survey de la semaine says your colleagues who were high school athletes, class clowns, or geeks are the most likely to wind up in a clique. And just like high school, these cliques exert their own peer pressure; 19 percent admitted they “Made fun of someone else or pretended not to like them.” Almost half went out drinking with the group, which, according to 46 percent of the surveyed workers, counted a boss in the gang. keep reading…

Google’s Weird Interview Questions: ‘A Complete Waste of Time

by Jun 24, 2013, 1:26 pm ET
Laszlo Bock

Laszlo Bock

You may have suspected that those peculiar interview brainteasers made famous by Google, Microsoft, and enough other companies that Glassdoor is able to come up with an annual list of 25 were, well, a waste of time.

You were right. And no less an authority than Google’s own Laszlo Bock says so. He’s Google’s senior vice president of people operations and in a New York Times interview he bluntly calls “a complete waste of time.” “They don’t predict anything,” he told The Times. “They serve primarily to make the interviewer feel smart.”

So the Google question that made this year’s Glassdoor list — “How many cows are there in Canada?” — has no probative value when determining whether the person being interviewed can do the job. Another of Bock’s frank admissions is that college grades and test scores have almost no correlation to future job performance. No longer does Google ask for college transcripts, except for brand new college grads. For everyone else, Bock told The Times, “We found that they don’t predict anything.” keep reading…

Winning at Basketball, and Recruiting, Big Data-Style

by Jun 20, 2013, 5:17 am ET

Screen Shot 2013-06-19 at 2.16.21 PMThe goal of any team sport is to win. Professional sports takes this concept one step further, since winning at the game also leads to greater revenue and profitability through higher attendance. When you think of professional sports as a business,  it becomes doubly clear why the management of those teams is always looking to find ways to gain competitive advantage.

This is why it is not surprising that Big Data analytics are finding their way into the sporting arenas around the globe.

“Moneyball” made the concept of data analytics in sports famous, but other stories highlight its use as well. For example, the Golden State Warriors of the National Basketball Association are pioneering the use of data analysis to improve the performance of its talent. Through statistical analysis, the team was able to uncover a blind spot where they did not know they were under performing. keep reading…

The Big Data HR Fad

by Jun 19, 2013, 6:45 am ET

Screen Shot 2013-06-12 at 9.08.04 AMNothing excites organizations like another fad. The latest one happens to be a thing called “Big Data.” Big Data refers to collecting so many performance numbers that understanding them becomes difficult. Some people suggest Big Data be applied to HR, which brings me to my point. While Big Data might work for managing things and numbers, how can it apply to something few understand, let alone manage and measure … like human performance?

Human performance is A + B = C … that is, something stimulates the employee/manager (A), he/she does X or says Y (B), and the result is either good or bad (C). For example, a manager might have two problem employees (A), he/she talks to them (B), and later, everything is all better (C).

Sound simple? Sure, we can often record results (C), and sometimes we can even record the problem (A), but what the heck happened in the middle? Shouting? Warning? Exploring differences? Coffee chats? Bribery? Threats? Blackmail? Extortion? Something else? keep reading…

2012′s Vendor Consolidation Holds the Potential for the Biggest Impact on Recruiting and HR

by Jan 1, 2013, 3:43 am ET

I recently got one of those year-end surveys asking about the significant developments in recruitment in 2012 and trends and predictions for next year.

My inclination was to ignore it; I’ve got enough to do keeping track of today, let alone trying to figure out what next year will bring. As for 2012, without the perspective of time, it’s hard to tell tell what will turn out to be significant in the long run. A few developments, though, will undoubtedly make the survey.

Social media for recruitment will be there, as will the drive to mobile. My list includes growing buzz over “big data,” even though it’s nowhere near clear how it will eventually make a difference in hiring and workforce management.

Vendor consolidation also makes my list. So too does the changing composition of the traditional workforce composition. By that I mean specifically the use of temps and contractors as a strategic component of the workforce, coupled with the growing cadre of professionals who, having turned to contract work (consulting, to put it politely) out of necessity are finding it suits them and provides a work/life balance companies mostly just talk about.

However, after thinking about my list, I realized that it’s the mergers and acquisitions that will have the biggest impact and will come to be seen as one of the more significant industry developments since the recession forced all of us to completely rethink and restructure what we do.

Much of what went on in 2012 was evolutionary, rather than revolutionary. And this is certainly true of the consolidation of the talent acquisition and HR management system vendors. It has been going on for some time now, though the setting was on simmer. But then SAP’s acquisition of SuccessFactors, technically a late 2011 event, turned up the heat. In short order Kenexa and  Taleo got bought up. And later, Bullhorn picked up Sendouts and MaxHire. There were also smaller deals that kept the pot boiling throughout the year.

The significance here isn’t the transactions themselves; it’s what’s behind them and, even more so, what it means for the future. keep reading…

Every Step You Take, Every Move You Make, I’ll Be Watching You — Big Data and Recruiting

by Dec 21, 2012, 5:21 am ET

In the movie “The Matrix” there’s a scene where Laurence Fishburne says to Keanu Reeves, “The Matrix is everywhere. It is all around us. Even now, in this very room. You can see it when you look out your window or when you turn on your television. You can feel it when you go to work … when you go to church … when you pay your taxes.”

That’s basically the premise of big data, where the potential in recruiting is in getting good candidates to respond. keep reading…

What President Obama’s Reelection Can Teach About the Importance of Talent Communities

by Nov 30, 2012, 5:12 am ET

Just weeks after I wrote a piece for ERE.net about talent communities, something happened on the Internet that excited much of the tech blogs and was acknowledged by many traditional press outlets; President Barack Obama held a 30-minute “ask-me-anything” session on the self-proclaimed “front page of the Internet” reddit.com. There is an important take away here for professional recruiters.

First things first.

Closer to the election, a day before in fact, the President took some time to once again drop in on redditors to ask for their votes. Contender Mitt Romney’s reddit.com appearances? Exactly two less than Mr. Obama’s.

The President invested some of his campaign time into a site like reddit because of its demographics.  Google’s Double Click Ad Planner reports that reddit traffic is overwhelmingly dominated by people under the age of 35. In addition to reddit, Team Obama also spent a lot of effort on getting content broadcast on Tumblr, another social site that hosts far more under-thirty-somethings than overs. And while it is not possible to determine specifically whether or not Mr. Obama’s reddit.com investment paid off, election results sure do look like the strategy of going where the youth vote was more than likely paid off.

Not only did the President dominate the youth vote nationally (see the graphic below, click to enlarge), more importantly in critical swing states he actually improved upon his 2008 performance in the youth vote (also see the figure below), something he was unable to do nationally.

The evidence suggests that the President’s investment to meet the key youth demographic where they were digitally clearly paid off.

Now to what it means to you. keep reading…