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Advice and How-Tos

These Strategic Goals Can Help to Focus Your Recruiting Function

by
Dr. John Sullivan
Mar 24, 2014, 5:09 am ET

What could be more important than having everyone on your team focused and on the same page? Unfortunately, in my interactions with corporate recruiting leaders, I am frequently surprised to find that they don’t have a formal set of strategic goals for their talent acquisition function. That’s a major problem because you certainly can’t be strategic unless you have a formal written strategy (most don’t) and a corresponding set of goals to make it clear to everyone what you’re trying to accomplish. Not having clearly defined, measurable, and communicated strategic goals can add to the confusion about “what is important” and “what is less important.”

While having goals provides focus and direction, their absence can cause team members to wander and to waste time and resources in low-value areas. So if you want your team to be laser focused on the important things, have clear goals that clarify your purpose and that specify what you’re trying to accomplish and what great results would look like.

In that light, this article provides a list of the strategic goals that truly effective corporate recruiting leaders can choose from. Reaching many of these recruiting goals is more complicated because the factors involved in reaching them are not 100 percent controlled by your team. However, it’s time for recruiting leaders to learn to follow the standard business practice of assuming the captain-of-the-ship role which assumes responsibility for meeting goals that you don’t have 100 percent control over.

The Possible Strategic Goals for the Recruiting Function keep reading…

How 25 Years of the Internet Has Re-Shaped HR

by
Jody Ordioni
Mar 20, 2014, 5:52 am ET

The Internet is celebrating its 25th birthday this week. 1989 was also the year the Berlin Wall came down, protests rocked China’s Tiananmen Square, “The Simpsons” debuted on TV … and HR was changed forever.

The Internet has transformed employer branding, internal communications, and talent acquisition in ways we hardly imagined in 1989. Many of the changes — even the beneficial ones — were disruptive, forcing HR professionals to alter how they operated. In honor of the Internet’s silver anniversary, I thought I’d look at the challenges brought about by two-way computer revolution — and how HR has adapted.

Employer Branding keep reading…

All Companies Should Hire Like Google

by
Shanil Kaderali
Mar 18, 2014, 6:25 am ET
Google - Santa Monica

Google – Santa Monica

I don’t work at Google. I never have. I know multiple managers and former directors in HR & recruiting who’ve been there and shared their experiences. I, like many, have read countless articles on why Google is so great place to work. In terms of products, I’m a fan but not devoted to any cult of Google. Some of its past hiring practices were arrogant, inefficient, and any experienced talent acquisition leader could tell you were a waste of time.

There are articles in the LA Times and elsewhere whose main premises are that Google is ignoring how smart applicants really are by not using intelligence testing any longer. “GPAs are worthless as a criteria for hiring, and test scores are worthless … We found that they don’t predict anything,” noted Lazlo Bock, head of talent at Google. They feel it’d be mistake to follow Google’s lead. I disagree.

I think they’re missing the big point. Companies should hire like Google but adapt to their needs. keep reading…

The Top 1% Recruiting Gap — Why Most Firms Have Surrendered to Google

by
Dr. John Sullivan
Mar 17, 2014, 5:09 am ET

A think piece designed to stimulate your thinking on competing against the top 1 percent firms for top talent

If you’re an executive interested in recruiting, here is a scary thought to consider. For the first time in your lifetime: As a result of their compelling approach to managing talent, the elite 1 percent of firms now have a powerful recruiting brand advantage. The resulting “recruiting brand gap” between the top 1 percent and the remaining 99 percent of firms is now so wide … that most firms have given up trying to match the talent approach of the 1 percent.

The Top 1 Percent of Firms Have Unique Talent Differentiators keep reading…

Values Determine Corporate Culture

by
Allyson Willoughby
Mar 14, 2014, 6:08 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-03-05 at 3.03.25 PMEvery company has a culture — whether leaders shape it or not. Rather than simply letting culture happen on its own, wise leaders proactively plan for and manage their company cultures, by first carefully determining and setting an example of the roots of every corporate culture: company values.

In a recent survey, we asked employees and job seekers the most important thing they look for in a company. While 79 percent said salary, 77 percent said company culture. If culture is not top of mind at your company, it should be. In order to get you thinking about how to develop your corporate culture, consider both your company values, and how to put them into action.

The Importance of Values keep reading…

If Barry White Were a Recruiter

by
Andrew Kinzer
Mar 13, 2014, 5:45 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-03-02 at 2.43.43 PMNobody wants a selfish lover or a selfish recruiter, so take a lesson from Barry White and warm up your talent prospect before popping the question.

The business of recruiting is a unique one, but in many ways there are parallels to the dating game. Finding an appealing talent prospect is like spotting someone across a crowded bar: you have to be aware that any candidate you’re talking to is also being looked at/assessed by a at least a half-dozen other thirsty companies.

With what is probably a bombardment of attention, the prospect most certainly has his/her shields up — and rightly so. To establish that relationship you have to get around those shields and bring something to the table that makes you stand out from the crowd.

And that begs the question: what if Barry White were a recruiter? How would he approach talent?

Immediate Gratification vs. Performance keep reading…

7 Questions and Answers About Recruiting With Social Media

by
Sean Pomeroy
Mar 12, 2014, 5:18 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-03-03 at 2.12.30 PMEveryone is incorporating social media into their recruiting practices, but every recruiter has had that moment — the moment when you feel like the kid in class, raising your hand to ask a question that you feel like everyone knows the answer to already.

This should help:  keep reading…

Making Moneyball Work

by
Raghav Singh
Mar 11, 2014, 5:47 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-02-20 at 10.45.35 PMBreaking News: (July 16, 2036) The national Comprehensive and Reliable Assessment of Performance (CRAP) database reached its goal of 100 percent coverage with the last employer — Roto Rooter of Northern Idaho — getting connected to share employee performance data. Employers nationwide now have a central resource to evaluate candidates for jobs, using the concept of Moneyball that was developed in the late 20th century. The database, established by the Dream On Act, is administered by the BUFFOONS (Bureau of Unreliable and Freely Flexible Or Objectionable Numbers and Statistics) at the Department of Labor.

Maybe this will come to pass, but don’t hold your breath and be careful what you wish for. Let’s think about what it’ll take to make Moneyball work. keep reading…

Big Ideas for Recruiting Leaders — What if Davos Covered Recruiting?

by
Dr. John Sullivan
Mar 10, 2014, 5:58 am ET

world economic forumForward-looking executives seeking truly big ideas understand the value of the Davos World Economic Forum, where only thought leaders and the most senior executives at top global firms are invited to attend. If there were to be a Davos-type “big-idea session” covering strategic recruiting, this article covers the big idea topics that I would propose for the agenda.

The hectic world of day-to-day recruiting is often dominated by having to solve tactical functional problems like cutting cost per hire or identifying the correct recruiter req load. However if you are a recruiting leader who wants to make quantum improvements of more than 25 percent in your results, step back and focus exclusively on a few big ideas. Big ideas by definition are potentially high-impact strategic actions that are barely emerging, that are extremely difficult to implement, and that may become essential as the business or recruiting environment evolves and changes. Also because they require a dramatic change in thinking, almost all big ideas are instantly rejected by shortsighted individuals in recruiting.

The Top 15 Future-focused Big Ideas for Recruiting Leaders to Contemplate keep reading…

6 Classic Rules of Engagement for Engaging Passive Candidates via Social Media

by
Carl Kutsmode and Vince Milne
Mar 10, 2014, 5:42 am ET

Round up the usual suspects. - Claude Rains, Casablanca, 1942

Movie buffs will recognize this classic line from the closing scene in the film Casablanca when the police captain issues an order and saves the hero, played by Humphrey Bogart, from arrest.  The quote also accurately and, in our view, unfortunately, describes a common recruitment scenario. Organizations often will dip into the same pool of “usual” candidates, time and time again, rather than make the effort to engage highly desirable passive candidates.

It’s not that recruiters don’t want to engage the passive candidates that, by some estimates comprise 75 percent of the workforce … it’s that they often really don’t know how OR don’t have the time. By definition, highly desirable passive candidates aren’t interested in switching jobs, so getting them interested in your organization and eventually building an interactive relationship via social media with your recruiters is challenging, to say the least.

While there are literally hundreds of social networking tools available, using them to craft a solid strategy to precisely pinpoint and truly engage passive candidates requires persistence, patience, and an understanding of six classic rules of engagement, described in more detail below:   keep reading…

Who’s to Blame for the Perfect Fit Syndrome ?

by
Ira Wolfe
Mar 6, 2014, 5:09 am ET

An employer trying to hire the perfect candidate is in many ways a good thing. It’s a significant improvement from the days of hiring anyone who could fog a mirror. But has the pendulum gone too far?

The answer is a resounding yes. A perfect candidate does not exist. He never has, he never will. The best any manager could hope for is the candidate who has many of the essential skills and experiences, lots of potential, a willingness to learn and develop continuously, and is engaged with and by the culture. That’s a tall order — a very tall order and one that many managers take to extremes.

The result of falling victim to The Perfect Fit Syndrome is that sometimes these positions are never filled. I’ll admit that might be the extreme case but it’s also not so uncommon.  Many managers place the sole blame on the poor quality of job applicants.

But that’s a cop-out and one excuse that senior management has bought hook, line, and sinker.  keep reading…

Opportunity Knocking: Super-Passive Candidates on the Decline

by
Brendan Browne
Mar 5, 2014, 10:26 am ET

We recently completed our largest survey to date on job seeking (more than 18,000 professionals in 26 countries) to shed light on the workforce’s attitude toward job satisfaction, new opportunities, and career evaluation. We discovered that while 75 percent of professionals identify themselves as passive candidates, only 15 percent are “super passives,” or folks who are happily employed and unwilling to consider changing jobs. That’s down 25 percent from 2012.

Why the decline? One of the reasons is that social/professional networks and other online resources have increased transparency — giving professionals and recruiters immediate access to jobs and prospects. But other forces are at play as well: some economies are improving, causing companies to open reqs and gainfully employed professionals to weigh their options.

Regardless of the causes, super-passive candidates declining means opportunity is knocking for recruiters like you and me. Here are the most important things my team has done and is doing to capitalize on the growing pool of what I like to call “approachable candidates”: keep reading…

Make Your Employer Branding and Onboarding More Fascinating With a Compelling Origin Story

by
David Lee
Mar 5, 2014, 12:30 am ET

Jean Hoffman and CatDoes your company have a compelling Origin Story? If you do, are you  using it to its fullest advantage or is it more of a best kept secret?

If so, you’re missing out on a powerful tool you could be using to make your employer branding, hiring, and new hire orientation more fascinating and inspiring.

In a previous ERE article, 5 Kinds of Stories to Tell During Onboarding, I included the Origin Story as one of the key stories to include in your onboarding process. In this article, we will focus on this one genre and why it is such an important part of your talent management arsenal.

First, though, let’s go deeper than the obvious answer to “What is an Origin Story?”

It’s far more than a fact-filled documentary about how and when your organization got started. It’s not the workplace equivalent of the high school history classes you snoozed through because they were filled with dates and events to memorize … but no stories.

Your Origin Story is a drama and a mini-documentary. It tells of the motivation behind the creation of your organization. It speaks of the difference your founders wanted to make in the world, the problem they saw and decided to solve.

When done well, your Origin Story accomplishes three things: keep reading…

Why MOOCs Might Revolutionize Your Recruiting Methods

by
Kevin Wheeler
Mar 4, 2014, 12:00 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-02-19 at 12.58.52 PMWhile recruiters continue to gain skills in search techniques, candidates are elusive and wary of getting unsolicited emails, InMails, and efforts to get them engaged with your firm on Facebook or LinkedIn.

Recruiters should also be much smarter about how they find and engage with candidates. A really good candidate has no need for trivial engagement with you and knows that he or she can easily find another position. The best recruiters use a targeted strategy to identify which candidates are most likely to not only have the skills their organization needs, but which ones are staying current in their field, are learning new skills, and which ones are motivated to work hard.

Younger candidates are attracted to firms that offer access to learning opportunities and older candidates are anxious to gain current, relevant skills.

There may be no better way to do this than to look in-depth at what MOOCs have to offer. keep reading…

Recruiting High School and Non-degreed Top Talent — A Missed Corporate Opportunity

by
Dr. John Sullivan
Mar 3, 2014, 5:43 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-02-26 at 12.55.50 PMIn case you didn’t hear about it, college football powerhouse Alabama recently offered a scholarship to eighth-grade football player Dylan Moses and LSU offered a scholarship to a ninth grader. Before you react in shock as a parent might, consider the fact that teenage talent may be the last remaining untapped corporate recruiting pool.  keep reading…

Adopt a Mindset of Measurement to Drive Recruiting Performance

by
Leonard Palomino
Feb 28, 2014, 5:19 am ET

I know half the money I spend on advertising is wasted. I just don’t know which half.

For many marketers — and recruiters — that famous statement attributed to 19th century department store merchant John Wanamaker is still true, even with all the technology and measurement tools available in the early 21st century. How many recruiters can say they are getting the most out of the opportunities to drive new efficiencies through technology available today?

It is never easy to change old methodologies. However, recruiters have a significant opportunity to adopt best practices from another function that was forced to reinvent its core strategies in the face of technology disruption and changing consumer behavior: marketing.  keep reading…

3 Ways to Keep Deadbeat Employees Out of Your Company

by
Jay Forte
Feb 27, 2014, 6:23 am ET

Today, your brand and reputation is built by those who touch your customers — your employees. It is your responsibility to guard the door to your business to allow only those who care about your customers in the way you do, and are committed to the values, beliefs, and mission of the business, to enter — to keep the deadbeats out.

Many organizations view hiring as a necessary evil instead of as the method to build the performance power of the organization. Understanding the impact the wrong employees have on the business (cost of mis-hire including replacement cost, impact on reputation, workplace interruption, etc.) encourages a more focused and determined effort on attracting, sourcing, and hiring the right ones. Here are three things that those who guard their doors to keep average and non-committed employees out of their high-performing organizations do: keep reading…

4 Reasons for Recruiting Leaders to Go to the ERE Conference in San Diego

by
Kevin Wheeler
Feb 26, 2014, 5:50 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-02-24 at 7.45.24 AMAre you going to the ERE Recruiting Conference & Expo this year in San Diego?  If not, maybe you should consider it.

I have been to almost every conference since the first one in 2000. It’s hard to believe that 14 years have gone by and the conference is still the premier event for recruiters in the U.S. It presents a world-class roundup of great talent management speakers, thought leaders, and corporate talent executives.

Over the years, I have made lasting connections, forged relationships, met great recruiters and learned more than I thought I would or could! Each year I come away invigorated and more aware of the challenges and successes that have made the previous year unique.

If you have attended once and then decided not to return, I urge you to think again.

The format, agenda, and focus have changed to focus on how to be a better recruiting leader. Here are some concrete reasons to attend this year: keep reading…

Informational Interviews for People Who Don’t Need Them

by
Josh Fox
Feb 26, 2014, 12:55 am ET

Sourcing has always been the hardest part of recruiting experienced, employed professionals (my experience has been with software developers). It’s much easier for me after I get into a serious conversation with candidates. I can establish rapport and find out what it takes to make them happy. But getting them to talk to me in the first place? Now that’s tough.  keep reading…

Recruiting Equals Knowledge Management

by
Charles Newton
Feb 25, 2014, 5:45 am ET

Knowledge management is defined as the efficient handling of information and resources within a commercial organization. That sounds a lot like the hiring process. Ultimately it is the goal of those involved in the hiring process to get all the relevant information to make an informed hiring decision. In this regard a lot of data is involved in recruiting. Consider a few ways everyone involved in the hiring process can improve his or her knowledge management efforts to improve the hiring process.

Hiring Managers keep reading…