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Advice and How-Tos

Speed Up Hiring Without Compromising Quality

by Nov 28, 2014, 5:26 am ET

Earlier this year, Dr. John Sullivan wrote a piece for ERE detailing the top 12 reasons why slow hiring damages recruiting – and hurts business results. Sullivan quotes a candidate who dropped out of the running for a coveted position because the hiring manager took too long to respond:

It’s not like I need their job. If it takes them a week to respond to a resume like mine for a job of this importance, they’re not the kind of company I want to work for. I move fast, and I can already see that my style wouldn’t fit in their culture. – Wind River Associates

It’s true that slow hiring puts you at a big disadvantage in the recruiting process. As Dr. Sullivan argues, moving too slowly can lead you to miss out on top candidates, lose revenue and productivity, and even damage your reputation as an employer and an organization. And with average time to fill at 25 days, its longest duration since 2001, there’s a good chance that many companies are feeling these effects.

However, there’s also risk involved when it comes to hiring too quickly. If you make an impulsive decision because you’re worried about losing a candidate to another company, you could end up hiring a candidate who’s a bad fit — and who ends up being a bad investment.

When it comes to hiring, talent acquisition professionals should follow the Goldilocks principle. The hiring process shouldn’t be too slow, and it shouldn’t be too fast.

The right pace depends on several things: the size of your organization, your company culture, the position you’re hiring for, and even the individual candidate. A company with 10 employees may want to spend more time getting to know a candidate than a company with 500 employees. Some candidates may seem like a perfect fit right away, while others may take several rounds of interviews.

To get the top talent — and ensure that they’re a good fit for your company, find the right pace for your hiring process.

Below are a few things to remember to help you do just that. keep reading…

The Battle for Global Recruiting Domination: Indeed vs. LinkedIn

by Nov 27, 2014, 5:45 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-11-06 at 7.45.45 AMWith over 300 million profiles and presence in 200 countries, LinkedIn seems to be the dominant player for global recruitment. But there is competition from a new kid on the block. Indeed. With a presence in 50 countries, 28 languages, millions of CVs, and at least 140 million job seekers monthly, Indeed seems to be the biggest competitor and the first player that really gives access to the complete global market.

Developments at Indeed and LinkedIn keep reading…

6 Great Hiring Quotes From the Book “Decisive”

by Nov 26, 2014, 5:27 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-11-10 at 8.37.20 PMI just finished reading the book Decisive by Dan and Chip Heath, authors of business best-sellers Made to Stick and Switch, and thought the content was vital to hiring managers. I was relieved that many of the decision-making principles detailed in the book mirror the Hire Like You Just Beat Cancer method my team developed through many years of experience — lots of successful hires and learning from hires who didn’t pan out.

Nearly every concept in “Decisive” could be integrated into your hiring process, but a few sections directly addressed hiring. Here are some of the top hiring quotes from “Decisive,” followed by some commentary: keep reading…

Raise the Grade on Recruitment Performance With Quarterly Incentives

by Nov 25, 2014, 5:55 am ET

EREConf14_footerBased on my experience, both as a former HR executive and as an agency owner, I believe corporate recruitment can be enhanced by borrowing strategies from well-managed agencies (and vice versa). For example, during my time at Dendrite, our recruiting staff was highly effective and engaged. Their success was a result of an agency-inspired, detailed, bonus structure, measured through hard and soft data that was tied to quarterly performance.

Detractors of this model have their concerns: ill-conceived benchmarks and fluctuations in business cycles can cause morale problems for those whose compensation is tied to performance. Others contend that it is impossible to set hiring metrics that fairly measure performance since there are so many players responsible for the ultimate outcome of hiring. Our winning process at Dendrite addressed these concerns. keep reading…

Hire to Hurt: the Boldest Recruiting Strategy of Them All

by Nov 24, 2014, 5:56 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-11-20 at 8.01.16 AMThe recruiting function is unique among business functions because almost no one in recruiting can actually name even a handful of the different strategies that are available to the chief recruiting leader. But this article is not about the complete list of recruiting strategies (it can be found here), but instead it is about which strategy from among the 20+ possibilities is the boldest and most aggressive recruiting strategy.

The “Hire to Hurt” strategy (or H2H for short) is the most aggressive for a variety of reasons. The first is that the name alone sends chills through the risk adverse in recruiting. The name of the strategy is also clearly indicative of its chief goal, which is to “identify key talent and then directly hire them away to the point where your H2H hiring actually hurts the competitor’s business results.”

It’s a two-for-one deal. Not only does your firm get top quality talent but simultaneously your top competitors’ lose key talent. As one CEO put it, “I really like that strategy; our ship rises while their ship sinks” (Incidentally, the No. 2 most aggressive recruiting strategy is “make other firms your farm team”.)

Join the Team, Because Every Other Business Function Already Tries to Hurt the Competitors keep reading…

Millennials and Leadership: What It All Means

by Nov 21, 2014, 6:14 am ET
leadership graph

Millennials: What do you consider most attractive in a manager/ leader role?

For the last decade or so, it seems that just about everyone has been talking about the millennial generation. They’re spoiled, they’re lazy. They shirk responsibility while also demanding rapid career advancement. They’re idealists, they have unrealistic expectations about work, they never grow up. They want work/life balance, they crave feedback, they quickly jump from job to job.

There is a lot of information out there, as well as a lot of stereotypes — and for many of you who recruit, hire, and work alongside millennials, you’ve probably experienced some of this first hand. You’ve probably also experienced another side of millennials — one that is eager, quick thinking, passionate, and ambitious.

In an effort to get to the root of this generation, Universum, INSEAD, and the HEAD Foundation recently partnered to conduct the largest global survey of millennials. Some of the results confirmed what we already knew to be true — millennials do want work/life balance! — while others revealed some real surprises. keep reading…

The Scoop on the Millennial Workforce: What Business Leaders Need to Know

by Nov 21, 2014, 5:51 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-11-17 at 12.52.22 PMMore than 1.6 million students graduated from college this year and many are still searching for their first post-college jobs. If you’re running a business and looking to hire, wouldn’t you want to hear how these millennials have performed on the job or in the classroom — straight from the mouths of those who have worked with them, supervised them, and taught them? It just might help you pick a winner out of the crowd.

In fact, past performance is one of the best indicators of future workplace success, so we got the inside scoop from references for thousands of entry-level job candidates — mostly the candidates’ previous managers and professors. What we learned might surprise you. keep reading…

Getting the Big Picture: Visual Content Is Critical to Building Engagement

by Nov 20, 2014, 5:33 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-11-16 at 8.32.44 PMLately the fastest-growing social networks are those that emphasize visual content. Instagram is the fastest-growing social network, followed by Tumblr and Pinterest. Data from Statista shows that people spend more time on Pinterest (1 hour 17 minutes per month) than on Twitter, LinkedIn, MySpace, and Google+ combined. On Facebook pictures and photos make up 75 percent of the content and produce an 87 percent engagement rate(as measured by likes and comments). Adding a video or photo URL to a tweet increases retweeting by 28-35 percent.

It seems a picture really is worth a thousand words. Recognizing this fact and taking advantage of it in recruitment marketing can be a big help to recruiters who are sourcing on social networks. keep reading…

Do Companies Make the Most of Their Employer Brands?

by Nov 18, 2014, 6:44 am ET

Campaign marketing managerBranding goes beyond messaging and includes a company’s products and services as well. The same goes for employer branding. Can Yelp employees rate their jobs on Yelp? Do Glassdoor Employees rate their experiences on Glassdoor? Can you drop your resumé into a Dropbox to apply for their jobs?

Can You Apply for a Job at Twitter With a Tweet? keep reading…

We’re Improving Recruiting Without Long Memos, Long Meetings, and Long Plans

by Nov 18, 2014, 12:01 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-11-06 at 11.01.51 AMI am fortunate to be part of an elite talent acquisition team at Spectrum Health. We are a team that gets results, results generated through recruiters who are passionate about excellence. The fun part is improvement.

We’re improving through recruiters driving change and functioning as front-line influencers. The road from good to elite comes with obstacles, but it doesn’t need to come with a 3-5 year implementation plan.

Below are tips on how to change quickly and why change should be implemented without relying on memos. keep reading…

Improve Offer Acceptance Rates by Revealing the Quality of Your Team Members

by Nov 17, 2014, 5:35 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-11-12 at 10.57.11 PMTop candidates demand quality co-workers … so show them profiles of team members

Imagine this recruiting scenario. During a final interview, one of your top tech candidates clearly appears to be wavering about whether she is willing to leave her current “pretty good job” and accept a possible new opportunity at your firm. Suddenly the hiring manager makes a bold and unexpected move by leaning over and handing this reluctant candidate a stack of resumes, each one from a member of his current team. Why? In order to show her the power, education, experience, and capabilities of the team she’ll be joining.

In this case the manager was Jonathan Rosenberg (as outlined in his recent book), who eventually ran the product team at Google. However, this “show-them-their-future-coworkers” approach can be used by almost any hiring manager. In my experience, revealing the quality of the coworkers remains as one of the simplest, most effective but least-used candidate closing approaches.

The Average Worker Cares About Coworker Quality keep reading…

What to Know About Finding and Contacting Nurses

by Nov 14, 2014, 12:39 am ET

nurseNurses are a refined set of dames, although nowadays males make up around 10 percent of the nursing workforce in the UK and the U.S.. There are studies that show males make more than females in nursing (about $10,000 more) but when phone sourcing I still find older females in senior nursing positions, however.

Not many picture Walt Whitman as a nurse, but the American poet, essayist, and journalist volunteered as one during the American Civil War. And making news today, William Pooley the British nurse who contracted Ebola while volunteering in West Africa, has returned to Sierra Leone to resume his work.

Increasingly today, doctors and nurses view each other as peers and with their own unique experiences that nurses bring to the field nursing is a great profession for both women and men with widening opportunities.

I’m going to give you some tips for contacting nurses, whether by phone or by email.  keep reading…

More than Money: Simple Perks Can Point to Great Employers

by Nov 12, 2014, 5:57 am ET

It can be tempting to dismiss the glowing praise of those who work at great employers in technology and other fields flush with cash. After all, what’s not to like about free smoothie stations, unlimited time off, Cadillac health plans, and other accoutrements of organizations that seem to spare no expense in attracting talent? But dig deeper, and you’ll find that some of the most valued policies at companies with satisfied employees aren’t necessarily about money. Here are a few worthwhile perks for HR professionals to consider, regardless of their industry or resources for employee benefits.

Flexibility keep reading…

Hire Self-Motivated People — the Single Smartest Thing a Hiring Manager Can Do

by Nov 10, 2014, 5:55 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-11-06 at 3.12.11 PMHow recruiters can become a hero of your hiring managers by dramatically reducing the number of hours that they have to spend motivating and watching their employees 

If you are a corporate manager, you already know that you routinely spend a significant portion of your time trying to motivate your employees. On average, I estimate that encouraging, cajoling, and the worst part, having to hang around just to ensure that your employees are continuously working takes up to 50 percent of the average manager’s time each week. If you don’t believe my estimate, ask a few managers to keep a work log for a few weeks if you want an accurate time for your firm. You might go a step further and ask a few of your managers if they enjoy trying to motivate and if they are good at it, because you’re likely to find that they dread every minute of it.

Fortunately you can recapture every minute of that “motivation time” if you just do one simple thing: begin recruiting and hiring self-motivated employees. These type of employees are not a myth. They are called self-motivated or intrinsically motivated people. Imagine what it would be like as a manager to have a team full of employees who not only automatically did the work that they were assigned but who would also proactively seek out new work that needed to be done.  keep reading…

10 Reasons a Video Interview Could Replace a Phone Screen

by Nov 6, 2014, 12:13 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-10-17 at 10.20.01 AMAfter watching over a hundred video interviews, I’ve come to believe they can replace the traditional phone screen, especially for positions with a high volume of applicants.

Recently, I reluctantly tried video interviewing for campus recruiting and found it to be a fabulous success that exceeded expectations. However, when the concept was initially presented there was a healthy dose of skepticism. It was one of those rare occasions when you communicate to your team that the trial is not really optional. Since then we’ve also been using it outside campus recruiting, primarily when the demographic is millennials or Gen Y and the applicant volume is high. Like most people, I initially stuck my nose up at the idea of losing the personal touch of a two-way conversation, but these brief interviews reveal so much about candidates.

Our skeptics have quickly become converts. This fall alone, we’ve screened three times as many people in about 80 percent of the previous time commitment. I would never have believed it if I had not tried it. The technology still has its faults, but I certainly think it’s headed in the right direction (I’m pushing our vendor to develop more functionality).

Typically the format for one-way (asynchronous) video interviews goes something like this: after screening a resume, you send out an email invitation to a candidate to participate in a video interview. The email contains a hyperlink which takes them to a website where they view pre-recorded short video clips of people asking interview questions. After each clip, candidates have a pre-determined (and brief) amount of time to think about the question, after which their webcam automatically begins recording their answers which are then saved for your viewing. Typically there are no re-takes.

Here are 10 positives: keep reading…

Enhance Your Employee Referral Program Marketing Approach

by Nov 4, 2014, 5:35 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-10-22 at 1.34.47 PMEmployees will refer talent into an organization when it’s easy and convenient for them — push and prod them too much and you risk disengagement. Effective, targeted marketing of your program is a key driver to adoption and success.

In an effort to increase engagement, we encourage our clients to focus their efforts on customized messaging and marketing of their referral programs delivered broadly, the message may appeal to everyone at the company, but will likely only engage a few).

Here are five techniques for enhancing your referral program marketing approach: keep reading…

Increase Hiring Manager Performance and Compliance With Service-level Agreements

by Nov 3, 2014, 12:49 am ET

Screen Shot 2014-10-30 at 10.19.29 AMI estimate that hiring managers are responsible for more than 60 percent of all delays and errors during hiring. So if you want to improve your quality of hire, reduce position vacancy days, and improve process compliance, it only makes sense to try to get hiring managers to put a greater focus on recruiting. One proven solution is to adopt service-level agreements, which are one of the most effective tools that drive service delivery consistency in service-related functions outside of HR. keep reading…

Top 10 Future Recruitment Trends

by Oct 31, 2014, 12:37 am ET

Fall 2014 ERE Conference Think Tank Session Recap 

Good conferences always offer great opportunities to stay on top of challenges, best practices, and future trends. The best conferences also offer new take-away ideas to implement within our own organizations. The recent ERE conference held in Chicago in late September delivered the goods on both fronts. As the moderator of an almost-two-hour-long Think Tank session on “Challenges and Future Trends in Talent Acquisition,” I was blown away (the conference was held in the Windy City, after all!) by the sheer number of issues — and solutions — that were discussed.

This post is too limited to include all of the great ideas that this group of very experienced HR and talent acquisition professionals discussed. So we picked the best of the best for the following list of “Top 10 Overall Best Practices” currently being applied to address the No. 1 challenge determined by the session participants: “finding and engaging qualified candidates.”

Again — a big thanks to all the in-house recruiting & HR professionals in attendance at this session who focused specifically on the key challenges and opportunities that will present themselves in 2014 and going into 2015.

Overall Top 10 Best Recruitment Practices (in no particular order) keep reading…

How to Customize the Sales Message for the Candidate

by Oct 30, 2014, 12:05 am ET

Bryan Adams-AES-033488Everyone loves a trip down memory lane. That’s why VH1 made those retrospectives about the 1980s, 1990s, etc. Admit it: once you caught five minutes of one of those shows, the next four hours of your life were forfeited.

A few years ago, when I was an IT recruiter back in Washington, D.C. (see what I did there? Clever, right?), one of my favorite parts of the job was getting to know each candidate and figuring out what their “story” was. What were their unique aspirations and hot buttons? How did they get to this point in their career? What were they passionate about in their lives? Being able to get to know someone, then matching them up with a company that matched their professional and personal ambitions was, to me, one of the best and most rewarding parts of the job. It was always a delight to follow up with them six months later and learn that they were indeed happy with the new direction in their career.

Any recruiter worth their salt will tell you that their ability to sell a candidate on a company or a job is their “raison d’etre” (for those of you who slept through French or Philosophy 101: reason they exist). Now, with skill set requirements and qualifications that rapidly evolve with each new technology and regulatory change, creating specialized pockets of highly competitive positions, this ability to differentiate an opportunity from the rest of the landscape has become more important than ever.

So how exactly, beyond sheer luck, do you ensure that “just right” fit? Let’s take a cue from VH1 and fire up a couple of classics for some help: keep reading…

Have You Hugged Your Data Today? Notes From the 2014 HR Tech Conference

by Oct 28, 2014, 6:38 am ET

The annual HR Technology Conference always provides a smorgasbord of food for thought. In years past my appetite for content related to talent assessment has not been satisfied. What a difference a few years makes.

This year’s show was packed with valuable information and insights related to the value of talent assessment.  keep reading…