Receive daily articles & headlines each day in your inbox with your free ERE Daily Subscription.

Not logged in. [log in or register]

Advice and How-Tos RSS feed

Advice and How-Tos

Revealing the ‘HR Professional of the Decade’ – Laszlo Bock of Google

by Mar 30, 2015, 5:45 am ET

LaszloBock576GreenA Case Study Compilation of the Amazing HR Practices That Make Google the Benchmark to Learn From

Using any set of assessment criteria, Laszlo Bock of Google has been in the vanguard in creating revolutionary change in the profession of HR to the point where he has earned the title of “HR professional of the decade.” Under his leadership, Google has literally led the way in innovation in all aspects of HR and it has become the world’s only data-driven HR function. Its willingness to continuously try completely unique approaches has resulted in Google being rated the No. 1 best place to work by numerous independent groups (Fortune six times, Fast Company, Glassdoor, Universum, and LinkedIn).

Working at Google has such a powerful employer brand draw that it receives an unparalleled 3 million applications a year, even though applicants only have an estimated 0.2 percent percent chance of getting hired.

But it’s more than just image that Mr. Bock has helped to create, because Google’s workforce productivity is simply amazing at $1.23 million per employee each year.

Not only has he molded the HR function at Google in nine short years into the benchmark model that everyone admires, but he has been extraordinary in his willingness to share his knowledge with both HR professionals and potential job applicants. Even though I have been writing and speaking in the HR field for three decades, I have never come across a leader who deserved the title of HR professional for an entire decade. HR is a unique field where very few corporate HR leaders are known by name throughout the profession but Laszlo Bock is clearly the exception, primarily because he openly shares what he has learned, even when it runs counter to standard HR thinking.

An Overview of the Amazing People Management Practices at Google keep reading…

Franchising’s Future is Kinda Up in the Air After the McDonald’s Ruling

by Mar 27, 2015, 5:08 am ET

mcdonald'sThe franchising industry is in a state of uncertainty, and its growth could derail.

Yes, the franchising model has proven to be highly successful, enabling small business ownership for hundreds of thousands of people in the United States. Franchisors have worked diligently to create proper systems and support for their franchisees that allow their brands to thrive and promote the success of the American economy. Indeed, the franchising industry is characterized by continuous growth and expansion; it is expected that 2015 will mark the fifth consecutive year in which the industry will grow and create more jobs faster than the rest of the economy.

But the time-tested model is in question after in July 2014, the National Labor Relations Board in the U.S. announced that a franchisor could be designated as a joint employer of its franchisee’s employees.

What This Means  keep reading…

Recruiting Can Be Really Hard Unless You Master the Simple Things

by Mar 26, 2015, 5:38 am ET

Screen Shot 2015-03-23 at 12.39.04 PMEvery successful recruiter that I have ever met does some very simple things well. When a requisition goes weeks and weeks without being filled, it’s the product of a fundamental break-down of a simple process.

The recruiting process typically breaks down in one or more of the following areas: keep reading…

Forget the Fixtures. Upgrade Your People

by Mar 25, 2015, 5:41 am ET

Delta+Flight+Attendants+3+smA regional convenience store chain with a not-so-stellar reputation recently renovated the store located a couple miles from my house. It’s actually quite beautiful as c-stores go — bright and open with new fixtures, colorful signage, and a classy stone façade.

But what happened in front of the refurbished building is what really caught my attention during my visit there last week. keep reading…

These Companies Show You Can Still Do Employer Branding Through Blogging

by Mar 24, 2015, 5:23 am ET

Screen Shot 2015-03-16 at 9.05.44 AMBlogs may not be the hottest new tool, but don’t rule them out as part of your organization’s employer branding and talent acquisition efforts.

A good blog can connect a company with job-seekers, energize candidates, and engage your current employees. Here are some tips for creating, maintaining, or improving a corporate recruiting blog, and a look at some companies that are doing those very things.  keep reading…

The World’s Most Effective Referral Approach – Give Me 5!

by Mar 23, 2015, 5:23 am ET

davita_way_bridge-_contact_us An effective referral tool that takes advantage of “memory retrieval cues”

Most already realize that employee referral programs routinely produce the highest quality of hires, but few know that the “Give Me 5” program produces the highest-performing hires of any individual referral approach.

The “Give Me 5 Names” tool is easy, fast, and free. You start by proactively approaching individual top performers in the target job area, but instead of asking them the standard question “do you know anyone?” (which usually draws a blank), you instead stimulate their recollection by using an effective memory stimulation trick known as “a retrieval cue.”

You stimulate the employees memory by asking them a more targeted question like “name the best innovator who you know in this field.”Almost without exception, providing that “cue” (innovator) will result in them providing you with the name of an innovator who they know. You then continue asking them for names in up to four additional categories like best manager, best problem solver, best team player, and best under pressure, until you have five great names (which is why the program is called Give Me 5). And then because the employee will likely personally know each individual, you ask them to help you to contact them and to convince them to consider working at your firm.

The Many Advantages of Using a Give Me 5 Approach keep reading…

You Have 1 of These 4 Brands

by Mar 20, 2015, 5:51 am ET

brandsSoftware is everywhere. It is, as Marc Andreessen pointed out, “eating the world.” What began with the communication and entertainment industries has expanded to include education, finance, national defense, and healthcare. Powerful software and the people that build it are now determining factors in the success of all major industries.

Today, a huge percentage of the people capable of building such software are millennials with a technical background. Employers need to create a brand and culture specifically geared toward hiring millennial tech talent in order to stay competitive. This can be a major departure from the norm in terms of culture, messaging, and brand.

We at Looksharp talk to a huge number of employers tasked with recruiting top technical talent that do not have the brands to compete effectively. Where do they start?

Employers tend to fall into four major categories, each with their own unique set of challenges and opportunities for differentiation. keep reading…

The Employer Brand Misalignment

by Mar 20, 2015, 5:29 am ET

Agile software team member writing on the iteration card wallIt’s a no-brainer that businesses rise or fall on the strength of the talent they attract to key leadership positions. What’s surprising is how many businesses understand this simple truth, but fail to implement comprehensive strategies to effectively compete for talent. For example, 93 percent of CEOs are aware of inadequacies in their talent attraction strategies, but more than 60 percent report they haven’t addressed these problems, according to PwC.

For some businesses, the problem is insufficient attention to the candidate experience, while for others it’s an ineffective applicant tracking system. However for far too many, the problem is the lack of a robust employer brand.

A Smart Investment keep reading…

How to Tell if Your Employer Brand and Talent Brand Are One and the Same

by Mar 19, 2015, 5:50 am ET

Screen Shot 2015-02-26 at 9.50.38 AMUp until now, employer branding referred to a company’s positioning and messaging as the employer of choice to a desired audience. Social media, however, has since changed the face of employer branding.

Instead of being a one-way message for positioning your company as a great place to work, it’s now a marketplace of thoughts and opinions. Branding is now in the hands of the very talent you seek — otherwise known as your talent brand. This is how talent views and socially brands a company, incorporating what talent thinks, feels, and shares about a company as a place to work.

How can you be sure what you’re saying and what talent is saying about your company is in tune? Here are three signs that your talent brand and employer brand don’t match, and how to better align them:

One Too Many Negative Comments keep reading…

Show Me the Money for Talent

by Mar 17, 2015, 5:03 am ET

moneyIf you ask most CEOs who don’t work for a non-profit what is most important to them, they will reply, “whatever makes the company money (revenue) or whatever saves the company money (margin/profit).” The primary marching orders from most CHROs for HR and recruiting functions will be about continuous improvement to reduce cost.

I know most recruiting leaders are nodding their heads as they read that statement.

Don’t worry. This is not another dull dry article about cost per hire.

As we should all know by now, from an acquiring talent perspective, as an industry we generally focus on two other major KPIs: speed and quality — beyond just cost.

The funny thing is when you really boil down these and other major KPIs, they all relate back to money anyway. Hold on, I will explain.  keep reading…

You Can’t Fix Job Descriptions, but You Don’t Have to Rely on Them

by Mar 13, 2015, 5:29 am ET

duct-tape2Job descriptions, those horribly written, barely comprehensible strings of roughly 500 words of stuff that only barely resembles reality if you squint hard, are the coin of the realm in the recruiting world. And no matter how much we complain about them to each other, they remain as unchanging as a rerun.

Not only do they persist, but recruiters and talent acquisition professionals continue to rely on them at every stage of the recruiting process. They assume candidates will search for the terms in the job description. They hope that the candidate will read all that jargon and bland verbiage and become compelled to apply. They cross their fingers that the candidate will refer back to the description when writing a resume and cover letter.

We know that job descriptions are flawed to the point of being broken, and yet we keep using them. Whether we blame “rules and regulations” or complain that writing all our job descriptions from scratch so that they have meaning would take months or years, we can’t ignore them and hope they get better magically. There is no job description-writing fairy godmother. The burden lies with you.

So here are some ideas on how to stop relying on job descriptions as the primary container of content, as the broken platform our entire recruitment marketing strategies are based on.

One: Don’t Erase Your Job Descriptions, Annotate Them keep reading…

Get to Know Potential Employees … on a Telephone

by Mar 12, 2015, 5:42 am ET

Screen Shot 2015-02-25 at 10.51.27 AMI am sure all of us have heard a derivation of this line in the last six months: “There is a war on talent, so we need to be prepared.” Whether you are an agency recruiter or a corporate one, it seems like this has been the mantra of late. 

Those of us who have been doing this for a while know this happens in cycles. Now it’s the war on talent. The next cycle will involve having great candidates but not having anywhere to put them. Being on the corporate side with an established brand definitely helps, but your brand alone is not going to close a candidate on your opportunity.

keep reading…

Why Career Fairs Need a Makeover

by Mar 12, 2015, 5:03 am ET

FEMA photo - Brittany TrotterCareer fairs are doomed, or are they?

When recently researching the topic as a co-author of the upcoming Handbook of Human Resources Management, I realized that there is little new insight or leading practices published about career fairs.

In order to find out more about the state of this recruiting channel I launched a sample poll in which 25 companies from across all major industries participated. Company sizes ranged from small (under 1,000 employees) to large ones (more than 100,000 employees). Geographically speaking responses came from Europe and North America.

Here is what I found: keep reading…

Marketing v. Recruiting: Who Owns Social Talent Acquisition? You Be the Judge

by Mar 11, 2015, 5:44 am ET

Screen Shot 2015-03-06 at 8.43.59 AMBailiff: The District Court of ERE will now hear the case of Marketing v. Recruiting.

Marketing: May it please the court, we believe that an organization’s Marketing department should own its social media recruiting channels. Marketing professionals have experience in social media from their consumer-facing efforts. They know how to create content, how to engage audiences, and how to track success with analytics. Recruiters have little experience in this type of interaction. They should stick to careers sites and job fair brochures, where they can best use their strengths — evaluating résumés and holding one-on-one conversations with candidates. A company should have one brand and speak to all its audiences with the same voice: the voice of Marketing. Thank you.

Judge: Very well. Recruiting? keep reading…

Former Processors, Sales Associates, and Receptionists Are Our Best Talent Recruiters

by Mar 10, 2015, 5:01 am ET

I hire non-recruiters who hire more than 1,000 people a year.

Do I have your attention?erewebinars-event-erc15[1]

If you’re reading this, and you’re a talent acquisition professional, you’re probably asking yourself, ‘what in the world?’ How does it work? keep reading…

3 Reasons to Stop the War for Talent

by Mar 10, 2015, 5:00 am ET

Screen Shot 2015-03-09 at 11.27.44 AMWhen resources are vital but scarce, our basic instincts lead us to provoke a conflict, to fight, and to go to war in order to claim it all for our own well-being. This explains most of the catastrophes and destructions in world history.

This is why I am not a fan of the “war for talent” concept. I do agree with the fact that talent is also vital and scarce, but being at war is not the best thing to do in managing our talent pipeline. When we define talent management as a “war,” we focus only on competing with each other and undermine our inevitable need for collaboration.

Three reasons why this war must be ended and three suggestions why collaboration must be our manifestation in a postwar talent environment: keep reading…

The Future Of Predictive Analytics – The Next Generation of Talent Metrics to Consider (Part 1 of 2)

by Mar 9, 2015, 5:22 am ET

A comprehensive list of current and future predictive talent metrics

The use of predictive analytics is a hot issue and a developing trend in talent management. But unfortunately as a longtime thought leader in the area, most of the current prediction efforts are extremely shallow. And as a result, they will have a minimal impact because they only cover a few basic areas like predicting employee flight risk and identifying the selection factors that predict hiring success. What will eventually be needed is a broader array of second- and third-generation predictive metrics covering many more advanced talent management factors.

If you’re curious about what factors must be measured in the future, here is a comprehensive list of the predictive talent analytics/metrics that should eventually be developed by forward-looking talent leaders. keep reading…

The Truth About What Passive Candidates Really Want

by Mar 5, 2015, 5:50 am ET

Screen Shot 2015-02-12 at 7.41.08 AMExpect to see a surge in the recruiting of passive candidates. While only 25 percent of global respondents from LinkedIn’s research are actively looking for work, 45 percent of candidates say that they would be open to speaking with a recruiter, which means that the passive talent pool could be a great source for finding fresh candidates. But how do you convince candidates who are satisfied with their job to make a switch?

Here are three things that can make the difference for a successful hire and what notable business leaders have to say about them. keep reading…

Boost Your Military Recruiting Efforts With 2 Simple Ingredients: Passion and Momentum

by Mar 4, 2015, 5:33 am ET

Screen Shot 2015-02-12 at 11.29.07 AMThe single-most impactful thing you can do to boost your military hiring efforts in 2015 is not a new technology or tool, not a pay-per-click service, or specialized candidate database. This strategy is budget friendly and team-focused.

The answer: search for and identify one person in your organization that is off-the-charts passionate about military and veteran-related issues. Then inspire, influence and persuade them to be your new project lead. keep reading…

How to Be Agile to Solve the Talent Acquisition Supply-and-demand Dance

by Mar 3, 2015, 9:03 am ET

erewebinars-event-erc15[1]When you think of the word agility, you might conjure images of an elite athlete sprinting to the finish line, or a Cheetah pursuing prey on the African plains, or a lawyer in cross examination in a court room. But have you considered what agility looks like in talent acquisition?

The foundation of talent acquisition is to align resources to business needs to fill positions. Sounds simple enough, right? Most talent acquisition leaders would agree that on paper this statement does appear simple, but many variables come into play that can complicate even the simplest of tasks. keep reading…