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Media Eating Up Religion-of-job-candidates Story

by Jun 18, 2014, 4:53 pm ET

Screen Shot 2014-06-18 at 1.36.41 PMA study published three months ago — March 24, 2014 — is quickly making the rounds in the media and social media. In brief, the paper says that in the southern U.S. states, only one religion is helpful for job candidates to have on their resumes.

A publication called Social Currents, from the Southern Sociological Society, published the study. Time, CNBC, the Washington Post, and others are reporting on it today, noting that job candidates who list a religion — such as Islam or Atheism or Catholicism — on a resume are less likely to receive an email from an employer.

With Jewish candidates, according to the study, there was “no statistically significant evidence of hiring discrimination.”

The authors speculate that the results could be due to 1) the importance of Judaism in Christian theology, which is influential in southern states; and 2) southern Jews historically not forming distinct areas like in the northeast, with the authors saying that “Jews thrived in the south not by brandishing their religious differences but by embracing key aspects of southern evangelical culture.”

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  • Matt Charney

    Go Jews.

  • Shannon

    I’m confused. Unless you’ve worked for a faith/religion based organization, why would your religion be on your resume?

  • toddraphael

    It shouldn’t be. But people’s religion is all over their Twitter bios, LinkedIn bios, and even resumes — so the study at least reflects reality, though not how things should be.

  • http://www.medievalrecruiter.com/ Medieval Recruiter

    What Todd said. Plus, it’s not unusual I’ve found for foreign resumes to include this information. Back when I first started working with UK people at a previous company and we had to implement the UK HRIS system, what they tracked for the equivalent of US EEO type info nearly gave HR a heart attack. Religion, marital status, ethnicity, race, etc. I looked at the form and I wondered how it could be legal.