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Attitude vs. Aptitude — Why There Are No Excuses in Recruiting

by Nov 12, 2013, 5:59 am ET

I have always told my hiring managers that there is no such thing as a position that cannot be filled. This is a bold statement, and many of my newer hiring managers or hiring managers who are new to working with me are taken back by this statement. Some find it to be over confident, even arrogant at times.

My belief is that as a recruiter, as long as you truly understand the business and hiring manager needs, you will be able to effectively manage unrealistic expectations, narrow focuses, and that you as a recruiter are completely capable of coaching and mentoring your client to accurately affect their ability to truly understand their core recruiting needs.

It is the recruiter who is responsible for managing expectations, and is directly responsible for influencing as a business partner, the outcome of the hire and the ultimate success of the department.

It is the recruiter who has the potential to make the greatest long-term impact on the department and the company. Once all companies (and HR departments) realize that the recruiter is accountable for long-term outcomes, and is a true advisor to the hiring manager rather than an order taker, or a processor, the sooner we will eliminate the narrow focuses of the hiring manager demands, and look for the true attitude and soft skills versus the technical aptitude.

The recruiter holds the direct relationship and influence to reduce short-sighted immediate points of view when hiring. This level of accountability and business partnership is essential if we will overcome many of the current obstacles we are encountering in an ever shrinking talent pool in the United States.

This article is provided for informational purposes only and is not intended to offer specific legal advice. You should consult your legal counsel regarding any threatened or pending litigation.

  • http://www.thehiretalent.com Fletcher Wimbush

    Well said Jeff. EQ, Behavioral Potential, and attitude play a much larger factor in a candidates potential long term success in any given role. Most skills can be trained on the job. Really all you need are candidates with just enough experience to meet the requirement plus all the soft skills.

    If you are a true partner your clients will learn this and appreciate the guidance you provide helping them find long term fits who are top producers.

  • S J

    Nice article.

    My greatest challenge in training recruiters is to get them to question old wives tales on hiring. It is the recruiters job to guide managers on the best advertisement and job description for open positions.

    Hiring is a science. It is no longer someone sitting behind a table reviewing a pile of resumes. It is now a seasoned and trained HR Recruiter seeking candidates for the immediate needs of the manager, and the long term needs of the organization.

    Recruiters start the cycle of “life” within many areas of the organization. They have to be at the helm of cutting edge developments, and be able to implement contemporary recruitment strategies and policies bringing their organizations into the global hiring environment.

    http://www.societyforemployeerelations.com/1/post/2013/11/entrenched-politics-in-microsoft-inc.html