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What the Blind Experience on Job Sites

by Jul 25, 2012, 5:24 am ET

As online recruiting sites get more complex, they can get harder to read for people who can’t see, as well as others who use “screen readers” because of challenges with their arms or other disabilities.

It doesn’t have to be that way, says Corbb O’Connor, a web usability consultant with O’Consulting Group. In the video below, O’Connor talks about:

  • Why video and slick images aren’t always a bad thing for the blind
  • The problem with contacting a company and asking for special help reading the site
  • What he’s finding on corporate career sites vs. job boards
  • Craigslist and LinkedIn
  • Simple things to keep in mind when designing sites

It’s about 10 minutes, below.

This article is provided for informational purposes only and is not intended to offer specific legal advice. You should consult your legal counsel regarding any threatened or pending litigation.

  • http://www.jobboarddoctor.com Jeff DickeyChasins

    Wonderful interview and great info. Thanks! Extremely useful.

  • Pingback: What the Blind Experience on Job Sites | Job Board News

  • Megan Stanish

    Thank you very much for posting this interview. This is wonderful, extremely relevant information for anyone who wants to create or upgrade a career site or even consider online application systems. Mr. O’Connor’s explanation of how the reader “sees” information and how it can differ from how the page appears to a sighted site visitor was very clear and tremendously helpful. Again, thank you.

  • http://www.changeforresults.com Elizabeth Black

    Corb O’Connor is a great “go to advisor” for employers who wish to tap into the skills and capabilities of the disabled. Whereas reading ADA rules and regs can have your head swimming, Corb has a wealth of practical solutions that are always helpful. Thanks to ERE for giving this talent a place to be heard.