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Report: U.S Falling Behind Talent War, Immigration Changes Needed

by
Todd Raphael
May 25, 2012, 6:57 pm ET

A new report looks at U.S. immigration policies, compares them to Australia, Canada, Chile, China, Germany, Ireland, Israel, Singapore, and the UK, and says changes are needed to keep America from falling being in the global battle over skilled employees.

The PDF comes from a group called the “Partnership for a New American Economy,” whose leaders include New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg. The group says the U.S. needs more young workers, and more science-math-technology types. It suggests, among other things, awarding more visas to graduates in science and math; awarding more green cards based on the needs of the American economy; and letting companies and local governments hire more people from overseas. More here.

This article is provided for informational purposes only and is not intended to offer specific legal advice. You should consult your legal counsel regarding any threatened or pending litigation.

  1. Jordan Clark

    Or we could start investing in programs to entice more US students/workers to obtain STEM related Degrees. Since they are in such high demand what better way then to start a Federally funded program combining donations from STEM heavy companies like Google, Facebook, Zinga, ect. to provide free grants to students looking to obtain STEM degrees. If you build it they will come!

  2. Keith Halperin

    @ Jordan: Well said. Also, a commitment from such companies to hire the qualified grads from many universities and not just those from top tier and elite schools.
    $64G question why does the number of STEM grads stay so low in the U.S, and why so few studsents interested in the various areas within STEM? Is it the “nerd factor”?

    -kh

  3. Tired of Bickering Politicians? Deloitte Report Offers Some Centrist Ideas for U.S. Competitiveness - ERE.net

    [...] other past reports, and pleas from some in the HR field, this one argues that more skilled employees be allowed to [...]

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